Village of Dobbs Ferry, NY
Westchester County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents

§ 300-35 Residential districts.

A. 
District purposes.
(1) 
General purposes of all residential districts. The residential zoning districts contained in this section are intended to:
(a) 
Provide appropriately located areas for residential development that are consistent with the Dobbs Ferry Vision Plan and with public health, safety, and general welfare;
(b) 
Allow for a variety of housing types and community amenities that meet the diverse physical, economic, and social needs of residents; and
(c) 
Respect the scale and character of existing residential neighborhoods and surrounding areas.
(2) 
Specific purposes of residential districts.
(a) 
One-Family Residential (OF) Districts. The primary purpose of the OF Districts is to maintain the character and scale of established neighborhoods characterized by one-family houses on individual lots and to allow for the appropriate development and redevelopment of lots in those areas. Clustered development may be appropriate in some areas with OF designation. The Zoning Ordinance provides a range of OF Districts (OF-1 to OF-6) which are differentiated primarily on the basis of minimum lot area and coverage requirements.
(b) 
Mixed-Density Residential (MDR) Districts. The primary purpose of the MDR Districts is to maintain the character and scale of established neighborhoods characterized by a mixture of detached one-family houses, two- and three-family homes, and multifamily housing, often found in large, older buildings which have been reorganized into apartments, and to allow for the appropriate development and redevelopment of lots and existing buildings in those areas. The districts are also intended to provide a transition between OF Districts and higher-density apartment districts or commercial districts. The Zoning Ordinance includes three types of MDR Districts intended to address the current and desired character of different areas of the Village.
[1] 
MDR-1 allows for a mixture of one-, two- and three-family dwelling units. A minimum lot area of 2,500 square feet per dwelling unit is required. See Appendix B, Table B-2.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Appendix B is included at the end of this chapter.
[2] 
MDR-2 allows for a more intense mixture of dwelling units, including townhomes and small multifamily buildings with a maximum of eight units per building. A minimum lot area of 800 square feet per dwelling unit is required. See Appendix B, Table B-2.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Appendix B is included at the end of this chapter.
[3] 
MDR-H is intended to reinforce the existing pattern of larger historic homes and estates that have been subdivided into multiple dwelling units while maintaining the exterior appearance of a single-family home. A minimum lot area of 2,500 square feet per dwelling unit is required. See Appendix B, Table B-2.[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Appendix B is included at the end of this chapter.
(c) 
Multifamily (MF) Districts. The primary purpose of the MF Districts is to maintain the character and scale of existing multifamily housing complexes. Although the districts accommodate a wide range of housing types, they are primarily intended to accommodate moderate- to high-density, multiunit residential buildings in areas where such development already exists. The Zoning Ordinance includes four MF Districts (MF-1, MF-2, MF-3 and MF-4). These districts are differentiated primarily on the basis of allowed density (minimum lot area per unit).
(d) 
Broadway (B) District. The purpose of the Broadway (B) District is to support the continued use of large homes, many built pre-1900, for multifamily and professional offices. Adaptive reuse that retains the historic character of the existing buildings is encouraged.
B. 
Residential design guidelines. Conformance with the Residential Design Guidelines, Appendix G,[4] as adopted by the Board of Trustees, is encouraged where applicable and shall be considered as part of the site plan review criteria, as well as the basis for the Architectural and Historic Review Board's evaluation.
[4]
Editor's Note: Appendix G is included at the end of this chapter.
C. 
Use requirements. Permitted uses and dwelling types in each residential district shall be as specified in Table A-1.[5]
[5]
Editor's Note: Table A-1 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
D. 
Area requirements.
(1) 
Minimum lot area. The minimum lot area shall be the greater of either the minimum specified in Table B-1 or B-2[6] (depending on the underlying zoning district) or the average lot area of the existing lots within 400 feet of the subject property, not including any lands in the OS-3 Zoning District.
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
[6]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1 and B-2 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(2) 
Minimum lot area per dwelling unit — residential districts. The minimum lot area per dwelling unit specified in Table B-2 shall be provided, regardless of whether multiple dwelling units are located on a single lot or on individual lots. No lot shall be subdivided to form two or more lots unless each and every resulting lot meets the minimum lot area per dwelling unit required by Table B-2.[7]
[7]
Editor's Note: Table B-2 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(3) 
Minimum lot width, depth and coverage. The minimum lot width and depth shall be the greater of the minimum specified in Tables B-1 or B-2 (depending on the underlying zoning district) or the minimum specified in Table B-3.[8]
[8]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1, B-2 and B-3 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(4) 
Minimum side yard setbacks. The minimum side yard setbacks (individually and combined) shall be the greater of the minimum specified in Tables B-1 or B-2 (depending on the underlying zoning district) or the minimum specified in Table B-4.[9]
[9]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1, B-2 and B-4 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(5) 
Minimum front yard setback. The minimum front yard setback shall be the lesser of:
(a) 
The prevailing front yard setback plus or minus 10% of the required minimum setback as defined by Table B-1 or B-2[10] (depending on the underlying zoning district); or
[10]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1 and B-2 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(b) 
The minimum specified in Tables B-1 or B-2 (depending on the underlying zoning district) or the minimum specified in Table B-5.[11]
[11]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1, B-2 and B-5 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(6) 
Maximum front yard setback. The maximum front yard setback shall be the prevailing front yard setback plus or minus 10% of the required minimum setback.
(7) 
Minimum rear yard setback. The minimum rear yard setback shall be the greater of the minimum specified in Tables B-1 or B-2 (depending on the underlying zoning district) or the minimum specified in Table B-5.[12]
[12]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1, B-2 and B-5 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(8) 
Maximum building height, ridge height, eave height and sky exposure plane. The maximum building height, maximum eave height, and massing of buildings in the OF and MDR-1 residential districts shall be controlled with context-based limits as described below and as specified in Table B-7.[13]
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
(a) 
In single-family residential zoning districts, the maximum building height shall be the lesser of:
[1] 
The prevailing ridge height determined by multiplying the average existing ridge height of buildings on lots within the context limit area of the subject lot by 1.25; or
[2] 
The maximum building height specified in Table B-6[14] (depending on the underlying zoning district and roof pitch). In no event, however, shall the building be required to be less than 2 1/2 stories or less than 28 feet to the ridge.
[14]
Editor's Note: Table B-6 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(b) 
In single-family residential zoning districts, the eave height shall not exceed the prevailing height determined by multiplying the average existing eave height of buildings on lots within the context limit area of the subject lot by 1.15. In no event, however, shall the building be required to have an eave height of less than 22 feet or be permitted to have an eave height of more than 28 feet.
(c) 
Anomalies identified by the Architectural and Historic Review Board, consisting of existing buildings with unusually high or unusually low ridges and/or eaves, may be excluded from the calculations used to determine the average ridge or average eave heights above.
(d) 
In any residential district where the maximum building height is limited to 2 1/2 stories, no portion of the building, except for chimneys and dormers seven feet or less in width, not to exceed a total aggregate width of 33% of the overall length of the building wall below that roof on which the dormers sit, shall penetrate the sky exposure plane.
[13]
Editor's Note: Table B-7 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(9) 
Maximum site coverage and impervious surface area. The maximum site coverage and impervious surface area shall be as specified in Table B-1, B-2 or B-3[15] (depending on the underlying zone district).
[15]
Editor's Note: Tables B-1, B-2 and B-3 are included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.

§ 300-36 Downtown districts.

A. 
District purposes.
(1) 
General purposes of all downtown districts. The downtown districts are intended to accommodate retail, service, residential and commercial uses and to ensure that business and commercial-zoned areas are compatible with the character of existing neighborhoods. The downtown districts are also intended to ensure the preservation of the unique character and quality of life in the downtown area by encouraging compatible redevelopment and infill development.
(2) 
Specific purposes of commercial districts.
(a) 
Downtown Business (DB) District. The purpose of the Downtown Business (DB) Zoning District is to maintain the existing character, scale and mix of uses in the downtown core that allow it to serve as the Village's meeting place while encouraging appropriate redevelopment that adds to the civic and economic vitality of the community. A mix of uses, including residential uses above nonresidential establishments, is encouraged. In order to encourage a pedestrian-friendly environment, flexible standards are provided for meeting parking requirements.
(b) 
Downtown Transition (DT) District. The purpose of the Downtown Transition (DT) Zoning District is to maintain the existing character, scale and mix of uses along Lower Main Street (below the Library) as a transition between the more intensive Downtown Business District and the surrounding residential areas. Residential uses are permitted on both the ground floor and above nonresidential establishments. In addition, the DT Zoning District may be applied to other commercial areas that serve surrounding residential neighborhoods.
(c) 
Gateway (DG) District. The purpose of the Downtown Gateway (DG) Zoning District is to provide an appropriate location for community- and region-serving commercial within a mixed use environment near the intersection of Ashford and Broadway; to enhance the pedestrian environment; to reduce traffic conflicts; and to encourage development including residential uses with a quality of design appropriate for this highly visible location. Development should be focused to the major streets, with transitions in building scale, intensity and use adjacent to established residential neighborhoods.
B. 
Downtown design guidelines. Conformance with the Downtown Design Guidelines in Appendix F,[1] as adopted by the Board of Trustees, is encouraged and shall be considered as part of the site plan review criteria, as well as a basis for the Architectural and Historic Review Board's evaluation.
[1]
Editor's Note: Appendix F is included at the end of this chapter.
C. 
Use requirements.
(1) 
Table of permitted uses. Permitted uses in the downtown zoning districts shall be as specified in Table A-2.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Table A-2 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
(2) 
Ground-floor uses restricted. In order to maintain an active streetscape for pedestrians and pedestrian-oriented businesses and activities, residential uses are prohibited along the entire length of the ground floor of the principal building adjacent to a public street in the DB and DG Districts. That nonresidential space shall be no less than 25 feet deep. Properties located in the DT District are exempt from this restriction.
D. 
Area requirements. All structures in the downtown zoning districts shall meet the standards in Table B-8.[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Table B-8 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
E. 
The building design standards are intended to ensure compatibility with the historic character and design quality of the Village. These standards apply within all downtown zoning districts, except where specifically noted. The Board of Trustees on recommendation from the AHRB and the Planning Board may, at its sole discretion, waive or modify these standards through the site plan review. See Table B-8.
[Amended 8-22-2017 by L.L. No. 6-2017]
(1) 
Upper-story setbacks. The number of permitted stories in the DT, DG and DB Zones shall be three stories. The addition of a fourth story of any building and/or a building in excess of 40 feet in a DG and DB Zones or 35 feet in the DT Zone (up to 45 feet in the DB and DG zones or 40 feet in the DT Zone) may be permitted only at the discretion of the Board of Trustees as part of the site plan review application and only after a reasoned judgment setting forth the public benefits of the development which would warrant the Board of Trustees granting approval of a fourth story and an increase in height above 40 feet or 35 feet as the case may be. In determining the appropriateness of the fourth story and an increase in height above 40 feet in the DB or DG Zones or 35 feet in the DT Zone, the Board of Trustees shall take into consideration the recommendations of the Planning Board and the AHRB in considering impacts, including but not limited to viewsheds, solar access to the streetscape and surrounding buildings, use and enjoyment of the Old Croton Aqueduct (OCA) and consistency with the character of the individual building and surrounding buildings. Based on a review of potential impacts cited above, a fourth story and/or an increase in height above 35 feet or 40 feet, if approved, may be required to recede from the front facade, either within a sloping roof form or as a setback volume and the applicant must use available techniques to minimize the visual impact of any such fourth story or increased height. In addition, in the downtown districts, the liveable floor area of the fourth story, if permitted, shall not comprise more than 50% of the total floor area of the story below.
300 Upper Story Setbacks.tif
(2) 
Transparency. Blank street-facing facades are not permitted. For new construction and additions, except for structures used solely for residential occupancy, transparent glazing shall be integrated into the design of each facade facing a public street, with storefront windows on the ground floor. Window glazing shall be clear and shall transmit at least 65% of visible daylight (visible transmittance shall be 0.65 or greater). Glazing must be maintained without interior or exterior obstructions that limit visibility, including, but not limited to, window signs, interior shelving, or window coverings during hours of business operation for a minimum distance of three feet from the interior face of the glass.
(3) 
Building articulation. Buildings shall be designed to reduce apparent mass and reflect historic patterns by including a clearly identifiable base, middle and top, with horizontal elements separating these components.
(4) 
Building entrances.
(a) 
Buildings shall have one or more pedestrian entrances located on the front facade and facing the street. A building located on a corner may have an angled entrance at the corner of the two streets. The pedestrian entrance(s) shall be operable during normal hours of business operation.
(b) 
Building entrances shall be emphasized through the use of architectural treatments.
300 Building Entrances.tif
F. 
Site development standards. The site development standards are intended to ensure compatibility with the historic character and design quality of the Village.
(1) 
Pedestrian access. Sites must be designed to promote safe and convenient pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular circulation according to the following standards:
(a) 
To establish and maintain a continuous streetscape, curb cuts allowing access to parking areas and service entrances shall be limited within the DB District to one curb cut for every 75 linear feet of street frontage. In no case shall a curb cut exceed 18 feet in width. Existing curb cuts shall be replaced with curbing when redevelopment of a property makes them unnecessary or inconsistent with the intended character of the zoning district.
(b) 
Pedestrian routes must be continuous, clear of obstructions, and easily identifiable as protected pedestrian routes. Landscaping, curbing, raised paving, bollards, distinctive paving materials, and other similar means may be used to separate and protect pedestrian routes from vehicular traffic.
(2) 
Parking.
(a) 
The Planning Board has the authority to waive the on-site parking for nonresidential uses with a floor area of 1,000 square feet or less.
(b) 
No parking shall be located between the front facade of the principal building and the adjacent street in the DB and DT Districts. To the maximum extent practicable, parking in the DG District should be focused to interior portions of a site, away from public streets.
(c) 
Any surface parking visible from a public street shall be screened by a thirty-inch- to forty-eight-inch-tall screening device. For the purposes of this section, "screening device" shall mean: a continuous masonry wall constructed of brick, stone or split-face concrete block; a combination masonry pier and decorative iron railing; other durable and decorative screening device that is consistent with the materials of the building facade (such as concrete or stucco); a solid, evergreen hedge; or a combination of the above. Chain link, wood or vinyl picket fencing are not appropriate screening devices.
(d) 
Any parking lot adjacent to a residential zoning district shall provide:
[1] 
A five-foot-tall screening device on the property line abutting the residential zoning district; and
[2] 
A ten-foot-wide landscaped buffer with trees located at a maximum 30 feet on center. The wall or fence described in Subsection F(2)(d)[1] above may be within the ten-foot buffer area.
(e) 
Paving materials for parking areas must be distinct from the paving material used for an adjacent sidewalk.
(f) 
The maintenance of screening, landscaping and paving may be required by the Planning Board, including the posting of a maintenance bond or cash deposit in an amount determined by the Land Use Officer and in a form acceptable to the Village Attorney, as a condition of site plan approval.

§ 300-37 Special districts.

A. 
Waterfront A (WF-A) District.
(1) 
District purpose.
(a) 
The purpose of the Waterfront District A is to permit and encourage water-dependent and water-related uses of the area in a manner consistent with the vision and priorities expressed in the Village's Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan (LWRP).
(b) 
The Waterfront District A designation permits recreational, open space, commercial and business uses that will benefit from and, in turn, enhance the unique aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental qualities of the waterfront area. This district is designed to protect the sensitive aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental features that exist along the shoreline, to promote and encourage public access to the shoreline and enjoyment of these features, to encourage appropriate water-oriented uses of this area, to preserve and enhance mixed commercial use of old industrial buildings that bring creative small businesses, artisans and entrepreneurs to the community and support the Village's economy and bring people to the waterfront area and to ensure appropriate density of commercial development.
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
(2) 
Permitted uses.
(a) 
Uses are permitted in the Waterfront A Zoning District in accordance with Table A-3.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Table A-3 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
(b) 
Any and every use allowed by this subsection is subject to and conditioned upon site plan review by the Board of Trustees and Planning Board pursuant to Article XII, except the following uses when they are located in structures existing on site as of September 23, 2003:
[1] 
Restaurants.
[2] 
Retail sales and service uses, sales-oriented.
[3] 
Studios for artists and craftspersons.
[4] 
Educational enterprises devoted to teaching arts, crafts, theater, music, yoga, martial arts, or any similar discipline, or to continuing educational enterprises for people of all ages whether engaged in the profit or not-for-profit sector.
(3) 
Special permit conditions and procedures.
(a) 
Uses within the Waterfront District A shall be subject to the issuance of special permits as described below and site plan review, in accordance with § 300-53.
(b) 
In considering any application for a special permit in the Waterfront District A, the Planning Board shall be guided by the general provisions pertaining to the issuance of special permits set forth in § 300-53.
(c) 
In addition to those general conditions, the Planning Board may condition the grant of a special permit on compliance with any reasonable requirements or conditions that are directly related and/or incidental to the proposed use so as to ensure that it will be in harmony with and further the objectives of the LWRP. These objectives include but are not limited to preservation and enhancement of the unique aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental qualities and features of this district for the maximum benefit and enjoyment of the entire community. Requirements or conditions under this provision may include or relate to any or all of the following:
[1] 
Maximizing and facilitating public ingress, egress, access to and enjoyment of the riverfront area and shoreline;
[2] 
Providing amenities, services and attractions that will draw people to the riverfront and encourage public use and enjoyment of the area;
[3] 
Requiring the use of best management practices with respect to protection of water quality, stormwater management, erosion and sediment control;
[4] 
Preserving the viewshed for maximum enjoyment and benefit of the community as a whole;
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
[5] 
Protecting streams and watercourses leading into the Hudson River;
[6] 
Ensuring appropriate location and screening of parking, utility installations and accessories, lighting and sign locations; and
[7] 
Supporting water-dependent and water-enhanced uses and activities.
(d) 
In granting a special permit under this subsection, the Planning Board shall make specific findings that set forth the manner in which the proposed use and special permit conditions are directly related and/or incidental to the proposed use so as to ensure that it will be in harmony with and further the objectives of the LWRP and, in particular, the preservation and enhancement of the unique aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental qualities and features of this district for the maximum benefit and enjoyment of the entire community.
(4) 
Dimensional standards. All structures in the waterfront zoning districts shall meet the standards in Table B-9.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Table B-9 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(5) 
Bulk and density computations. No portion of any lot or parcel in the Village that lies beneath the mean high water mark may be used or taken into consideration in calculating the permissible yield, density, bulk, lot coverage or site coverage of all or any part of the upland portion of the lot of which the underwater portion is a part.
B. 
Waterfront B (WF-B) District.
(1) 
District purpose.
(a) 
The purpose of the Waterfront District B is to permit and encourage uses of the area in a manner consistent with the vision and priorities expressed in the Village's Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan (LWRP).
(b) 
The Waterfront District B designation permits recreational, open space, commercial, business and residential uses that will benefit from and, in turn, enhance the unique aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental qualities of the waterfront area. This district is designed to protect the sensitive aesthetic, recreational, historic and environmental features that exist along the shoreline, to promote and encourage public access to the shoreline and enjoyment of these features, to preserve and enhance mixed commercial use of old industrial buildings that bring creative small businesses, artisans and entrepreneurs to the community and support the Village's economy and bring people to the waterfront area and to ensure appropriate mixed-use density of both commercial and residential development.
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
(2) 
Permitted uses.
(a) 
Uses are permitted in the Waterfront B Zoning District in accordance with Table A-3.[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Table A-3 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
(b) 
Any and every use allowed by this subsection is subject to and conditioned upon site plan review by the Board of Trustees and Planning Board pursuant to Article XII, except the following uses when they are located in structures existing on site as of September 23, 2003:
[1] 
Retail sales and service uses, sales-oriented.
[2] 
Studios for artists and craftspersons.
[3] 
Educational enterprises devoted to teaching arts, crafts, theater, music, yoga, martial arts, or any similar discipline, or to continuing educational enterprises for people of all ages whether engaged in the profit or not-for-profit sector.
(3) 
Bulk and density computations. In applying the dimensional standards set forth in Table B-9,[4] in addition to any other applicable adjustment required by this chapter, an area equivalent to 140% of the footprint of any existing building or structure scheduled to remain shall be subtracted from the total lot area before the permissible bulk or density limits are derived.
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
[4]
Editor's Note: Table B-9 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(4) 
Dimensional standards. All structures in the WF-B Zoning District shall meet the standards in Table B-9.[5]
[5]
Editor's Note: Table B-9 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(5) 
Development incentive density bonuses in Waterfront District B. In order to further the objectives of the LWRP and the Vision Plan, the Board of Trustees in consultation with the Planning Board may increase the permissible density of development in the Waterfront District B as set forth below:
(a) 
The Board of Trustees may provide density bonuses in accordance with this subsection in exchange for an applicant providing one or more of the following facilities or amenities:
[1] 
Maximizing and facilitating public ingress, egress, access to and enjoyment of the shoreline in Waterfront District A by the construction of a pedestrian esplanade way along the river shore in Waterfront District B as a contiguous portion of a larger Village riverwalk, such as is proposed in the LWRP;
[2] 
Maximizing and facilitating public ingress, egress, access to and enjoyment of the shoreline in Waterfront District A by shoreline stabilization and bulkhead restoration projects, construction of piers, launching facilities or other recreational waterfront or shoreline amenities;
[3] 
Maximizing and facilitating public ingress, egress, access to and enjoyment of the shoreline in Waterfront District A and providing linkage between the waterfront and the rest of the Village by creating and/or restoring, maintaining and making available to the public one or more means of access over the railroad right-of-way and ensuring public access thereto over and across property within the Waterfront Zoning District B;
[4] 
Committing a significant portion of land in Waterfront A and B Districts to park or open space use, either by conveying the land to the Village for such purposes or by other means, such as covenants, deed restrictions and conservation easements.
[5] 
Providing publicly accessible open space and/or recreational areas in Waterfront A and B Districts and providing access to Waterfront District A from Waterfront District B;
[6] 
Protecting steep slopes and environmentally sensitive features;
[7] 
Providing public access to the Metro North Station and encouraging the use of mass transit;
[8] 
Preserving a significant portion of the existing structures in Waterfront A or B District for uses described in § 300-37B(2);
[9] 
Providing a mix of residential unit sizes (e.g., one-bedroom, two-bedroom) in development to be constructed in Waterfront District B that is consistent with the needs of the Village; and
[10] 
Achieving a LEED rating for the development within the Waterfront District B to the greatest extent possible.
(b) 
For applicants who provide or make provision for amenities and facilities listed in § 300-37B(5)(a) above, the Board of Trustees may, at its discretion, award bonuses by increasing the density ratios in Waterfront District B up to a maximum of 20%. A bonus awarded under this provision may be in any increment between 0% and 20% in proportion to the degree to which the proposed amenities confer benefits identified in § 300-37B(5)(a) above, and shall be computed by reducing the minimum size of plot per family by the amount of the bonus. For example, if a bonus of 10% were allowed, permissible density would be calculated based on a reduction of the minimum lot per family from 2,500 square feet to 2,250 square feet. The bonus permitted under this section is a bonus in permissible density only and does not authorize any enlargement of the permissible bulk or lot coverage of buildings to be constructed.[6]
[6]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. I).
(c) 
In awarding a density bonus under this subsection, the Board of Trustees shall make specific findings that set forth in detail the amenities to be provided by the applicant, how those amenities further the purposes of the LWRP and the Vision Plan and, in particular, how they preserve and enhance the unique aesthetic, recreational, environmental and historic qualities and features of this district for the maximum benefit and enjoyment of the entire community and otherwise promote the public health, safety and welfare of the community. The finding shall also set forth in detail the relationship between the amenities being provided and the bonus being awarded and shall specify the rationale supporting the proportionality of the amenities to the bonus.
(6) 
General requirements and restrictions.[7]
(a) 
All lighting must comply with the standards of § 300-41.
(b) 
In addition to the standards set forth in §§ 300-38A and 300-46C, there shall be no construction on or regrading of steeply sloped areas greater than 25% unless the Planning Board and/or the Board of Trustees makes a specific finding that such construction or regrading is warranted by considerations that make alternative approaches less desirable in view of overall planning considerations (including the overall objectives of the LWRP) and will be carried out in a manner consistent with best management and engineering practices for such construction or regrading.
[7]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. I).
C. 
Chauncey Park (CP) District.
(1) 
District purpose. The purpose of the Chauncey Park (CP) Zoning District is to facilitate redevelopment opportunities in the area of the Village bordering the Saw Mill Parkway immediately north and south of Lawrence Street. The area was originally a small hamlet served by the Putnam train line with a station at Lawrence Street. Because of its remote location relative to the remainder of the Village and its excellent access to the regional roadways, the area is particularly appropriate for larger-scale redevelopment as a mixed use center with substantial employment and mid- to high-density residential opportunities. New construction in the CP District shall meet standards for cluster development, with a site design that is sensitive to the environmentally sensitive features in the area, including wetlands and watercourses, steep slopes, and woodland areas, and that takes advantage of opportunities for trail connections, sidewalks and greenbelts. In addition, building design should reflect the modernist architectural style of existing buildings. As the area represents a prime development opportunity in the Village, all plans will be held to the highest standards of site design, architecture and green building.
(2) 
Cluster development mandated. In order to allow for additional flexibility in site and building design while ensuring the highest quality development with significant community benefits, any redevelopment of portions or the entirety of the CP zoned property that includes the subdivision of properties or the development of new structures shall be consistent with the standards for cluster development in Article XIII, § 300-54F.
(3) 
Permitted uses. Permitted uses in the Chauncey Park (CP) Zoning District shall be as specified in Table A-3.[8]
[8]
Editor's Note: Table A-3 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
(4) 
Dimensional standards. Dimensional standards in the Chauncey Park (CP) Zoning District shall be as specified in Table B-10.[9]
[9]
Editor's Note: Table B-10 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(5) 
Base density. The base density for development within the Chauncey Park District is one unit per 1,800 square feet of gross site area. The density may be increased according to the bonuses set forth in Subsection C(6) below and the standards set forth in "Clustered development" in Article XIII, § 300-54F.
(6) 
Development incentive bonus in the Chauncey Park District. In order to further the objectives of the LWRP and the Vision Plan, the Board of Trustees in consultation with the Planning Board may increase the permissible density of development in the Chauncey Park District as set forth below:
[Amended 6-14-2011 by L.L. No. 6-2011]
(a) 
The Board of Trustees may provide, in its sole discretion, density bonuses in accordance with this subsection in exchange for an applicant providing one or more of the following facilities or amenities:
[1] 
Preserving environmentally sensitive features such as steep slopes, rock outcroppings, watercourses and stands of trees;
[2] 
Implementing stormwater management measures that improve the water quality in wetlands and help prevent flooding of the Saw Mill River Parkway;
[3] 
Committing a significant portion of land in the Chauncey Park District to park or open space use, either by conveying the land in the Chauncey Park District to the Village for such purposes or by other means, such as covenants, deed restrictions, and/or conservation easements;
[4] 
Promoting walking and biking trails that help connect sidewalks and off-site trails through the Chauncey Park District to neighboring communities' parkland, the Putnam bike trail, and Hillside Park;
[5] 
Improving vehicular traffic patterns and connections to adjacent street networks through the Chauncey Park District to reduce congestion;
[6] 
Encouraging the use of mass-transit for people visiting, working or living in the Chauncey Park District;
[7] 
Providing a shuttle bus system connecting the Chauncey Park District to the downtown portions of the Village of Dobbs Ferry and the Metro North Station;
[8] 
Preserving a significant portion of the existing structures in the Chauncey Park District;
[9] 
Providing a mix of residential unit sizes (e.g., one-bedroom and two bedroom units) in development to be constructed in the Chauncey Park District that is consistent with the needs of the Village; and
[10] 
Achieving a LEED-ND rating for the development within the Chauncey Park District, although actual certification is not required.
(b) 
For applicants who provide or make provision for amenities and facilities listed in § 300-37C(6)(a) above, the Board of Trustees may, at its discretion, award bonuses by increasing the density ratios in Chauncey Park District up to a maximum of 20%. A bonus awarded under this provision may be in any increment between 0% and 20% in proportion to the degree to which the proposed amenities confer benefits identified in § 300-37C(6)(a) above, and shall be computed by reducing the minimum size of plot per family by the amount of the bonus. For example, if a bonus of 10% were allowed, permissible density would be calculated based on a reduction of the minimum lot per family from 1,800 square feet to 1,620 square feet. The bonus permitted under this section is a bonus in permissible density only and does not authorize any enlargement of the permissible bulk or lot coverage of buildings to be constructed.
(c) 
In awarding a density bonus under this subsection, the Board of Trustees shall make specific findings that set forth in detail the amenities to be provided by the applicant, how those amenities further the purposes of the LWRP and the Vision Plan and, in particular, how they preserve and enhance the unique aesthetic, recreational, environmental and historic qualities and features of this district for the maximum benefit and enjoyment of the entire community and otherwise promote the public health, safety and welfare of the community. The findings shall also set forth in detail the relationship between the amenities being provided and the bonus being awarded and shall specify the rationale supporting the proportionality of the amenities to the bonus.
D. 
Educational/Institutional (EI) District.
(1) 
District purpose. The purpose of the EI District is to accommodate the development of public or quasi-public facilities or private facilities of a noncommercial character, including churches, hospitals, schools and cultural facilities in a campus-like setting with substantial open space. The Ardsley Country Club, while an existing private facility, is included within this district because of similar land use impacts and the campus-like setting of the facility. The Dobbs Ferry Hospital, while it does not include substantial open space, is included within this EI District specifically because it is a large public facility with a property that is incongruent with its surrounding residential neighbors, requiring better control of the uses of that property and their impacts on the surrounding community. Because of the size of the EI zoned lands and the potential for significant impacts on surrounding properties and the community as a whole, redevelopment and subdivision applications shall meet the cluster development standards. In order to permit a comprehensive understanding and review of future development potential, a plan illustrating the property owner's development and disposition plans for the site should accompany any such application.
(2) 
Cluster development mandated. In order to allow for additional flexibility in site and building design while ensuring the highest quality development with significant community benefits, any redevelopment of portions or the entire parcel in the EI zone that includes the subdivision of properties or the development of new structures shall be and are mandated to be consistent with the standards for cluster development in Article XIII, § 300-54F.
(3) 
Development plan required. Any application for subdivision or development shall include a graphic plan and accompanying text illustrating the property owner's long-term plan for the development and disposition of the site. Such plan should, at a minimum, indicate proposed roadway and pedestrian path alignments, open space and sensitive natural areas/features, areas identified for disposition, and proposed uses, densities and building heights. Where a rezoning application is anticipated for a portion or the entirety of the site, the preferred zoning designation should also be indicated. Such plan shall not constitute an application for rezoning.
(4) 
Permitted uses. Permitted uses in the EI Zoning District shall be as specified in Table A-3.[10]
[10]
Editor's Note: Table A-3 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix A.
(5) 
Dimensional standards. Dimensional standards in the EI District shall be as specified in Table B-10.[11]
[11]
Editor's Note: Table B-10 is included at the end of this chapter in Appendix B.
(6) 
Base density. The base permitted density for development within the EI District is per 40,000 square feet. That density may be increased according to the standards for cluster development at Article XIII, § 300-54F, and the findings of the site plan review.