Township of Mansfield, NJ
Warren County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Board of Health of the Township of Mansfield 2-24-1999 by Ord. No. 99-04. Amendments noted where applicable.]
GENERAL REFERENCES
Open wells and excavations — See Ch. 390.
Individual sewage disposal systems — See Ch. 401.

§ 413-1 Title.

This chapter shall be known as "Public Noncommunity and Nonpublic Water Systems" and shall provide standards for the construction of new public noncommunity and nonpublic water systems.

§ 413-2 Definitions.

As used in this chapter, the terms shall have the meanings defined by N.J.A.C. 7:10-1.3 and N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.3. Those definitions include the following:
NONPUBLIC WATER SYSTEM
A water system that is not a public water system.. A nonpublic water system includes any water system providing potable water to individual dwellings and any water system regularly serving fewer than 15 service connections or 25 individuals.
PUBLIC COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM
A public water system which serves at least 15 service connections used by year-round residents or regularly serves at least 25 year-round residents.
PUBLIC NONCOMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM
A public water system that is not a public community water system and is either a "public nontransient, noncommunity water system" or a "public transient, noncommunity water system" as defined in this section.
PUBLIC NONTRANSIENT, NONCOMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM
A public water system that is not a public community water system and that regularly serves at least 25 of the same persons for more than six months in any given calendar year.
PUBLIC TRANSIENT, NONCOMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM
A public water system that is not a public community or a public nontransient, noncommunity water system that serves at least 25 transient individuals for at least 60 days in any given calendar year.
PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM
A system for the provision to the public of piped water for human consumption, if such system has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves at least 25 individuals daily for at least 60 days in any given calendar year. Such term includes any collection, treatment, storage and distribution facilities under control of the operator of such system and used primarily in connection with such system, and any collection or pretreatment storage facilities not under such control which are used primarily in connection with such system. A public water system is either a "public community water system" or a "public noncommunity water system" as defined in this section.
WATER SYSTEM
A system for providing potable water to any person.

§ 413-3 Standards.

Except as hereinafter modified, the standards for construction of public noncommunity and nonpublic water systems set forth in N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.9 et seq. established pursuant to N.J.S.A. 58:11-23 et seq. are hereby adopted in their entirety and incorporated herein by reference.

§ 413-4 Testing required; time of required testing.

A. 
No building permit shall be issued for the construction of any new residence on any lot until the Mansfield Township Board of Health, acting through its agent the Warren County Health Department, has certified that either:
(1) 
There is an approved public water system which will serve the proposed building; or
(2) 
A well or wells are located and operating on the lot which have been tested and provide sufficient yield and recovery rates to satisfy the requirements of §§ 413-5 and 413-6.
B. 
No certificate of occupancy shall be issued for any new residence until the Mansfield Township Board of Health, acting through its agent the Warren County Health Department, has certified that the water supplied by the water system serving the residence has been tested and meets the requirements of § 413-7.
C. 
The Warren County Health Department, acting as the authorized agent of the Mansfield Township Board of Health, may require that the testing procedures required by N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.1 et seq. or by this chapter be witnessed by an agent or employee of the Health Department.

§ 413-5 Nonpublic water system pumping capacity.

Notwithstanding the water volume requirements of N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.6, the total yield of any nonpublic water system supplying a residence shall be no less than 2.0 gallons per minute at the tap per residence served.

§ 413-6 Nonpublic water system recovery requirements.

In addition to the water volume requirements of § 413-4 of this chapter, any nonpublic water system shall have a minimum recovery rate at the end of 30 minutes of at least 0.5 gallons per minute as determined by the following described testing methods and procedures:
A. 
Introduction and description of testing method.
(1) 
The following is a test for evaluating the adequacy of supply wells to meet typical household water demands. The test method consists of pumping a recently completed well and allowing it to recover. The test is designed to be performed over a period of approximately six hours. The test shall be conducted only after the recently drilled well has been allowed to recover from the drilling process for not less than three days. This will allow the well to recover to the static water level in the aquifer from the depressed level caused by dewatering during drilling. The yield of the well is measured during the pumping period and water levels are measured at regular intervals during the recovery period after the well pump is turned off. Water-level recovery rates during the recovery period allow an estimate of groundwater inflow to the well. This rate can be referred to as the well-recovery rate. Wells are judged to be adequate if they recover at a rate of at least 0.5 gallon per minute during the first half hour of recovery. The water level in the well is also measured 24 and 48 hours after completion of the test to record information on the long-term water-level recovery.
(2) 
A worksheet is provided to record the test and carry out calculations to evaluate the well. A computer program is also available to record results and allow a more rigorous analysis of the test.
B. 
Procedures for testing well.
(1) 
Measure the static water level in the well. The static water level is the depth to water in the well at rest. The static water level shall be measured in feet below the top of the well casing before pumping the well. The static water level shall not be measured less than three days after the completion of well drilling. The static water level shall be recorded on the appropriate place on the test worksheet.
(2) 
Begin pumping of well.
(a) 
Attempt to pump the well at the rate of at least five gallons per minute for two hours, or until well ceases pumping, whichever occurs first. The well discharge rate can be measured using a flow meter or, more simply, a five-gallon bucket and stop watch. Record the well discharge in the first five minutes of the pumping period, then 25, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes into the pumping period. Measure the depth to the water in the well at the time the well discharge measurements are taken. Measure the depth to water in the well immediately before turning off the pump. This is the final well pumping level. Record the well discharge rates and accompanying water levels on the worksheet.
(b) 
If the well pumpage cannot be sustained for 120 minutes, begin the recovery test whenever the well stops pumping water. Measure the discharge and water levels at the intervals indicated above until the well stops pumping.
(3) 
Begin well-recovery test:
(a) 
Turn the well pump off and begin the well recovery test. Measure the water level in the well during the recovery period at the times shown in Table 1, Well Recovery Test, on the worksheet. These measurements are well-recovery levels. Recovery readings shall be collected 24 and 48 hours after the testing is complete.
(b) 
Calculate well-recovery percentage at each well-recovery measurement. Well-recovery percentage is the ratio of drawdown remaining in the well to the total drawdown caused by pumping. Record the well-recovery percentage at each well-recovery time step in Table 1.
Final well pumping level (feet) – recovery level (feet)
Well recovery percentage
=
Well pumping level (feet) – static water level (feet)
(c) 
The well shall be allowed to recover for at least four hours or until 90% of the drawdown experienced during the pumping test is recovered, whichever comes first. If the water level in the well returns to 90% of its original static water level before four hours has passed, record this time as well-recovery time in Table 1. If 90% of the drawdown is not recovered within four hours, the recovery time is four hours. Document percentage recovery at 24 and 48 hours in Table 1.
(4) 
Calculate the well-recovery rate:
(a) 
The recovery rate of the well is the volume of inflow to the well bore during a specified time, usually one minute. An inflow rate shall be calculated for each of the time steps listed in Step 3 above. Table 1 provides instructions for the calculation of the well-recovery rates. The well-recovery rate is calculated by the following method:
Water level at time 1 (feet) – water level at time 2 (feet) x 1.5 gallons per foot
Well inflow rate (gpm)
=
Recovery time 1 – recovery time 2 (minutes)
(b) 
The well will recover fastest at the beginning. The well-recovery rate is the inflow calculated over the first 30 minutes. It is equal to the volume of water entering the well in gallons divided by 30 minutes, and is expressed in gallons per minute.
(5) 
Determine if recovery rate is satisfactory. To be judged acceptable for domestic use, the well-recovery rate at the end of 30 minutes shall be at least 0.5 gallon per minute per residence served. If the well fails to achieve a recovery rate of 0.5 gpm, the test shall be repeated to insure that all steps were undertaken correctly. If it fails a second time, the well shall be deepened or re-drilled at a different location. Deepening the well may result in encountering additional water-bearing fractures. Generally, if the well depth exceeds 600 feet, the chances of encountering additional water-bearing fractures are minimal. If a replacement well is drilled and fails to pass this test, it may be possible to use both wells in combination to meet the expected demand if the well-recovery rate of both wells together exceeds 0.5 gpm.

§ 413-7 Nonpublic water system quality standards.

A. 
A nonpublic water system shall meet the water quality analysis and treatment requirements of N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.30 for the following compounds:
(1) 
Total coliform.
(2) 
Nitrates.
(3) 
Iron.
(4) 
Manganese.
(5) 
pH.
B. 
If it is necessary to install a water treatment device on any portable water supply system in order to meet the above stated standards, it shall be the obligation of the owner or the builder of the system to install an appropriate water treatment device as approved by the Warren County Health Department. Once such a device is installed, it must remain on the site and be utilized in conjunction with the water supply system.

§ 413-8 Abandoned boreholes or wells.

The drilling contractor or the owner of the property shall seal any borehole or well that is abandoned during construction or is not completed or constructed in accordance with rules and regulations in effect at the time of construction, in accordance with N.J.S.A. 58:4A-4.1 and N.J.A.C. 7:9-9.1, et seq. Failure to seal an abandoned well may subject the owner to the penalty provided for in N.J.S.A. 58:4a-4.2.

§ 413-9 Public record.

Three copies of N.J.A.C. 7:10-12.1 et seq. have been placed on file in the office of the clerk of this local Board of Health and will remain on file there for the use and examination of the public.

§ 413-10 Fees.

For the application and review of plans, the sampling of and the inspection of all newly constructed public noncommunity and nonpublic water systems, and the witnessing of testing, the fee shall be as established by the Warren County Health Department acting as the authorized agent of the Mansfield Township Board of Health.