Village of Argyle, WI
Lafayette County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
A. 
All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased and produced (per kilowatt-hour of sales).
B. 
The current cost per kilowatt-hour of energy billed is equal to the cost of power purchased and produced for the most recent month divided by the kilowatt-hours of energy sold. The monthly adjustment (rounded to the nearest one 1/100 of a cent) is equal to the current cost less the base cost. The base cost of power (U) is $0.0549 per kilowatt-hour.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Periodic changes shall be made to maintain the proper relative structure of the rates and to ensure that power costs are being equitably recovered from the various rate classes. The company shall file with the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin within 30 days for changes in the rates to incorporate a portion of the power cost adjustment into the base rates if, after final wholesale rates have been authorized, the monthly adjustment (A) exceeds $0.0150 per kilowatt-hour.
D. 
For purposes of calculating the power cost adjustment charge, the following formula shall be used:
C
A
=
S
-
U
A
is the power cost adjustment rate in dollars per kilowatt-hour rounded to four decimal places applied on a per kilowatt-hour basis to all metered sales of electricity.
S
is the total kilowatt-hours sold during the most recent month.
U
is the base cost of power which equals the average cost of power purchased and produced per kilowatt-hour of sales for the test year period. This figure remains constant in each subsequent monthly calculation at $0.0271 per kilowatt-hour until otherwise changed by the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin.
C
is the cost of power purchased and produced in dollars in the most recent month. Cost of power purchased and produced for calculation of C are the monthly amounts which would be recorded in the following accounts of the Uniform System of Accounts:
Class A and B utilities
Accounts 501, 536, 547 and 555
Class C utilities
Accounts 501, 531, 539 and 545
Class D utilities
Accounts 501, 521, 531 and 540
A. 
Application. This rate will be applied to residential single-phase customers in the Village of Argyle for ordinary household purposes. Single-phase motors may not exceed five-horsepower individual-rated capacity without Utility permission. Customers who do not meet this criteria will be served under the applicable rate.
B. 
Customer charges: $7 per month, single-phase; $15, three-phase.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Energy charge: $0.0934 per kilowatt-hour.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
D. 
Power cost adjustment clause: charge per all kilowatt-hours, varies monthly, see schedule PCAC.
E. 
Minimum monthly bill. The minimum monthly bill shall be the customer charge.
F. 
Prompt payment of bills. A charge of 3% per month, but not less than $0.50, will be added to bills not paid within 20 days from date of issuance. A late payment charge shall be applied only once to any given amount outstanding. This charge is applicable to all customers.
A. 
Application.
(1) 
This rate will be applied to single- and three-phase customers. This includes commercial, institutional, government, farm and other customers. The monthly maximum measured demand of customers served on this rate shall not exceed 40 kilowatts for three or more months in a consecutive twelve-month period.
(2) 
Cg-1 customers shall be transferred into the appropriate demand class as soon as the application conditions of that class have been met.
B. 
Customer charge.[1]
(1) 
Single-phase: $7 per month.
(2) 
Three-phase: $15 per month.
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Energy charge: $0.0934 per kilowatt-hour.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
D. 
Power cost adjustment clause: charge per all kilowatt-hours varies monthly; see Schedule PCAC.
E. 
Minimum monthly bill. The minimum monthly bill shall be the customer charge.
F. 
Prompt payment of bills. Same as Rg-1.
G. 
Determination of maximum measured demand. The maximum measured demand in any month shall be that demand in kilowatts necessary to supply the average kilowatts in 15 consecutive minutes of greatest consumption of electricity during each month. Such maximum measured demand shall be determined from readings of permanently installed meters or, at the option of the Utility, by any standard methods or meters. Said demand meter shall be reset to zero when the meter is read each month.
A. 
Application.
(1) 
This rate will he applied to customers for all types of service if their monthly maximum measured demand is in excess of 40 kilowatts per month for three or more months in a consecutive twelve-month period unless the customer exceeds the application conditions of the Large Power, Cp-2, Schedule.
(2) 
Customers billed on this rate shall continue to be billed on this rate until their monthly maximum measured demand is less than 40 kilowatts per month for 12 consecutive months. The Utility shall annually offer a customer billed on this rate the option to continue to be billed on this rate for another 12 months if their monthly maximum measured demand is less than 40 kilowatts per month. However, this option shall be offered with the provision that the customer waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule.
B. 
Customer charge: $50 per month.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Demand charge: $6.50 per kilowatts of billed demand.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
D. 
Energy charge: $0.0664 per kilowatt-hour.[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
E. 
Power cost adjustment clause. Charge per all kilowatt-hours, varies monthly, see Schedule PCAC.
F. 
Minimum monthly bill. The minimum monthly bill shall be equal to the customer charge plus $0.50 per kilowatts of the highest monthly maximum measured demand occurring in the current month or preceding eleven-month period.
G. 
Demand/energy limiter. Customers with low load factors shall pay the lesser of a bill calculated on the standard demand and energy rates or $0.1300 per kilowatt-hour.
H. 
Prompt payment of bills. Same as Rg-1.
I. 
Determination of maximum measured demand. The maximum measured demand in any month shall be that demand in kilowatts necessary to supply the average kilowatts in 15 consecutive minutes of greatest consumption of electricity during each month. Such maximum measured demand shall be determined from readings of permanently installed meters or, at the option of the Utility, by any standard methods or meters. Said demand meter shall be reset to zero when the meter is read each month.
A. 
Application.
(1) 
This rate will be applied to customers for all types of service if their monthly maximum measured demand is in excess of 200 kilowatts per month for three or more months in a consecutive twelve-month period.
(2) 
Customers billed on this rate shall continue to be billed on this rate until their monthly maximum measured demand is less than 200 kilowatts per month for 12 consecutive months. The Utility shall annually offer a customer billed on this rate the option to continue to continue to be billed on this rate for another 12 months if their monthly. Maximum measured demand is less than 200 kilowatts per month. However, this option shall be offered with the provision that the customer waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule.
B. 
Customer charge: $75 per month.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Distribution demand charge: $1 per kilowatt of on-peak billed demand.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
D. 
Demand charge: $7 per kilowatt of billed demand.[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
E. 
Energy charge: $0.0554 per kilowatt-hour.[4]
[4]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
F. 
Power cost adjustment clause: charge per all kilowatt-hours, varies monthly, see schedule PCAC.
G. 
Prompt payment of bills. Same as Rg-1.
H. 
Minimum monthly bill. The minimum monthly bill shall be equal to the customer charge plus the distribution demand charge.
I. 
Determination of distribution demand. The distribution demand shall be the highest monthly maximum measured demand occurring in the current month or preceding eleven-month period.
J. 
Determination of maximum demand. The maximum measured demand in any month shall be that demand in kilowatts necessary to supply the average kilowatts in 15 consecutive minutes of greatest consumption of electricity during each month. Such maximum measured demand shall be determined from readings of permanently installed meters or, at the option of the Utility, by any standard methods or meters. Said demand meter shall be reset to zero when the meter is read each month.
A. 
Application. This schedule will be applied to municipal streetlighting. The Utility will furnish, install and maintain streetlighting units. This rate schedule is closed to new mercury vapor lights.
B. 
Investment charge.[1]
Overhead:
175 W MV — $7 per lamp per month
100 W HPS — $7 per lamp per month
150 W HPS — $8 per lamp per month
250 W HPS — $9.25 per lamp per month
Ornamental:
150 W HPS — $10 per lamp per month
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Energy charge: $0.0538 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
D. 
Power cost adjustment clause. Charge per all kilowatt-hours, varies monthly, see Schedule PCAC.
E. 
Prompt payment of bills. Same as Rg-1.
NOTE:
MV
=
Mercury Vapor
HPS
=
High Pressure Sodium
A. 
Effective in all territories served by the Utility.
B. 
Availability. Available for all single-phase and three-phase customers where a part or all of the electrical requirements of the customer are supplied by the customer's generation facilities, where such facilities have a total generating capability of 20 kilowatts or less, where such facilities are connected in parallel with the Utility, and where such facilities are approved by the Utility.
C. 
Rate. The customer shall be billed monthly on a net energy basis and shall pay the fixed charge and energy charge specified in the rate schedule under which he is served. If in any month the customer's bill has a credit balance of $25 or less, the amount shall be credited to subsequent bills until a debit balance is reestablished. If the credit balance is more than $25, the customer can be reimbursed by check upon request. Monthly credits shall be computed by taking the net excess kilowatt-hours produced times the sum of the applicable energy charge plus monthly fuel adjustment clause.
D. 
Metering and service facilities. A customer who is served under a regular rate schedule shall have any rachet and/or other device removed from his meter to allow reverse power flow and measurement of net energy used. Customers eligible for net energy billing but with existing metering facilities equipped with ratchets or other devices preventing reverse registration (i.e., time-of-day metering facilities), may request that the Utility install the necessary metering to permit such billing.
E. 
Customer obligations. (See Pgs-2, Sections 10 and 11; § 263-74J and K.)
A. 
Effective in all territories serviced by the Utility.
B. 
Availability.
(1) 
Available for single-phase and three-phase customers where a part or all of the electrical requirements of the customer are supplied by the customer's generation facilities, where such facilities have a total generating capability of greater than 20 kilowatts and less than or equal to 100 kilowatts, where such facilities are connected in parallel with the Utility, and where such facilities are approved by the Utility. Customers not desiring to sell energy under this rate have the right to negotiate a buyback rate.
(2) 
The energy rate indicated below is the minimum for electrical energy. Customers with generating facilities greater than 100 kilowatts can negotiate a buyback rate. Should the Utility be unwilling to pay the minimum rate for electrical energy, the Utility shall agree to transport such electrical energy to another Utility who will pay such minimum rate. The Utility shall recover actual costs of such transportation from the generating customer.
C. 
Rate.
(1) 
Customers shall receive monthly payment for all electricity delivered to the Utility and shall be billed by the Utility for metering and associated billing expenses specified in the latest rates of the wholesale supplier, unless the latest rates of the wholesale supplier do not properly reflect avoided costs. In such event, the Commission may determine revised rates.
(2) 
The Utility shall have on file a copy of the latest customer-owned generation system rates for the wholesale supplier.
D. 
On-peak hours, off-peak hours and holidays. On-peak and off-peak hours and holidays are those specified in the wholesale supplier's latest rates.
E. 
Minimum charge. The monthly minimum charge paid by the customer shall be the customer charge.
F. 
Power factor. The customer shall operate on a net power factor of not less than 90%.
G. 
Negotiated rates.
(1) 
Customers with generation systems greater than 100 kilowatts can negotiate a buyback rate.
(2) 
Customers with generation systems greater than 20 kilowatts and less than or equal to 100 kilowatts have the right to negotiate buyback rates. The buyback rate cannot be greater than the full avoided cost.
(3) 
The following are the required procedure guidelines:
(a) 
The Utility must respond to the customer-owned generating system within 30 days of the initial written receipt of the customer-owned generating system proposal and within 30 days of receipt of a subsequent customer-owned generating system proposal.
(b) 
The Utility's rejection of the customer-owned generating system proposal must be accompanied by a counteroffer relating to the specific subject matter of the customer-owned generating system proposal.
(c) 
If the Utility is unable to respond to the customer-owned generating system proposal within 30 days it shall inform the customer-owned generating system of:
[1] 
Specific information needed to evaluate the customer-owned generating system proposal.
[2] 
The precise difficulty encountered in evaluating the customer-owned generating system proposal.
[3] 
The estimated date that it will respond to the customer-owned generating system proposal.
(d) 
The Commission may become involved in the Utility negotiations upon showing by either the Utility or the customer-owned generating system that a reasonable conclusion cannot be reached under the above guidelines. The Commission may provide a waiver to the guidelines and order new negotiation requirements so that a reasonable conclusion can be reached.
(e) 
A copy of all negotiated buyback rates shall be sent to the Commission. These rates shall not be effective until the contract is placed on file by the Commission.
H. 
Charges for energy supplied by the Utility. Energy supplied by the Utility to the customer shall be billed in accordance with the standard applicable rate schedules of the Utility.
I. 
Maintenance rate. A customer-owned generation facility may be billed lower demand charges for energy purchased during scheduled maintenance, provided written approval is obtained in advance from the Utility. Demand charges other than "customer demand" shall be prorated if maintenance is scheduled such that the Utility does not incur additional capacity costs. Said proration shall be the demand charge times the number of authorized days of scheduled maintenance divided by the number of days in the billing period.
J. 
Contract required. A contract is required between the Utility and the customer-owned generation facility. The contract shall specify safety, system protection, and power quality rules that generators must comply with. The contract shall require a minimum of $100,000 liability insurance or proof of financial responsibility for the customer-owned generation system. Contracts with customer-owned generation facilities selling energy under the standard (nonnegotiated) rate have no specific term or length. Contracts with customer-owned generation facilities selling energy under a negotiated rate shall contain performance requirements and be of sufficient length to ensure the Utility avoids the costs for which the customer-owned generating facility has been paid.
K. 
Customer obligations.
(1) 
Metering facilities and wiring. The customer shall furnish, install and wire the necessary service entrance equipment, meter sockets, meter enclosure cabinets, or meter connection cabinets that may be required by the Utility to properly meter usage and sales to the Utility.
(2) 
Interconnection costs. The owner of the generating facility shall be required to pay all interconnection costs, including metering, incurred by the Utility. Said costs, including financing costs, shall be paid by the owner within two years of the installation date of the interconnection facilities.
(3) 
Liability insurance. The owner of the generating facility shall be required to have liability insurance on the generating facility of at least $100,000 or be able to prove financial responsibility.
(4) 
Interconnection and operation (safety and power quality) requirements. Electric service to a customer-owned electric generation installation may be disconnected for failure to comply with these requirements.
(a) 
Interconnection of a generating facility with the Utility system shall not be permitted until application has been made to and approval received from the electric Utility. The Utility may withhold approval only for good reason such as failure to comply with applicable Utility or governmental rules or laws. The Utility shall require a contract specifying reasonable technical connection and operating aspects for the parallel generating facility.
(b) 
The Utility may require that for each generating facility there be provided, between the generator or generators and the Utility system, a lockable load-break disconnect switch. For installations interconnected at greater than 600 volts, a fused cutout switch may be substituted where practicable. The switches shall be accessible to the Utility for the purpose of isolating the parallel generating facility from the Utility system when necessary.
(c) 
The Utility shall require a separate distribution transformer for a customer having a generating facility where necessary for reasons of public or employee safety or where the potential exists for the generating facility causing problems with the service of other customers. Ordinarily this requirement should not be necessary for an induction-type generator with a capacity of five kilowatts or less or other generating units of 10 kilowatts or less that utilize line-commutated inverters.
(d) 
Where necessary to avoid the potential for a facility causing problems with the service of other customers, the Utility should limit the capacity and operating characteristics of single-phase generators in a manner consistent with its existing limitations for single-phase motors. Ordinarily single-phase generators should be limited to a capacity of 10 kilowatts or less.
(e) 
The Utility shall require that each generating facility have a system for automatically isolating the generator from the Utility's system upon loss of the Utility supply, unless the Utility desires that the local generation be continued to supply isolated load. For synchronous and induction generators such protection against continued operation when isolated from the Utility system will ordinarily consist of over-current protection, fuse or circuit breaker, plus a voltage or frequency controlled contractor which would automatically disconnect the unit whenever its output voltage or frequency drifted outside predetermined limits, such as plus or minus 10% of the rated values.
[1] 
Other suitable protective systems against abnormal voltages of frequencies may be accepted by the Utility.
(f) 
The Utility shall require that the customer discontinue parallel generation operation when it so requests, and the Utility may isolate the generating installation from its system at times:
[1] 
When considered necessary to facilitate maintenance or repair of Utility facilities.
[2] 
When considered necessary during system emergencies.
[3] 
When considered necessary during such times as the generating facility is operating in a hazardous manner or is operating such that it adversely affects service to other customers or to nearby communication systems or circuits.
(g) 
The owner of the generating facility shall be required to make the equipment available and permit entry upon the property by electric and communication Utility personnel at reasonable times for the purposes of testing isolation and protective equipment and evaluating the quality of power delivered to the Utility's system and testing to determine whether the local generating facility is the source of any electric service or communications systems problems.
(h) 
The power output of the generating facility shall be maintained such that frequency and voltage are compatible with normal Utility service and do not cause that Utility service to fall outside the prescribed limits of Commission rules and other standard limitations.
(i) 
The generating facility shall be operated so that variations from acceptable voltage levels and other service-impairing disturbances do not result in adverse effects on the service or equipment of other customers and in a manner which does not produce undesirable levels of harmonics in the Utility power supply.
(j) 
The owner of the generating facility shall be responsible for providing protection for the owner's installed equipment and for adhering to all applicable national, state and local codes. The design and configuration of certain generating equipment, such as that utilizing line-commutated inverters, sometimes requires an isolation transformer as part of the generating installation for safety and for protection of the generating facilities.
L. 
Utility obligation.
(1) 
Metering equipment. The Utility shall install appropriate metering facilities to record all flows of energy necessary to bill in accordance with the charges and credits of this rate schedule.
(2) 
Notice to communications firms. Each electric utility shall notify telephone utility and cable television firms in the area when it knows that a customer-owned generating facility is to be interconnected with its system. This notification shall be as early as practicable to permit coordinated analysis and testing in advance of interconnection, if considered necessary by the electric or telephone utility or cable television firm
M. 
Right to appeal. The owner of a generating facility interconnected or proposed to be interconnected with a utility system may appeal to the Commission should any requirement of the Utility service rules filed in accordance with the provisions of § PSC 113.0201, Wis. Adm. Code, or the required contract be considered to be excessive or unreasonable. Such appeal will be reviewed and the customer notified of the Commission's determination.
A. 
Budget payment plan. A budget payment plan which is in accordance with Ch. PSC 113, Wis. Adm. Code, is available from the Utility. The Utility does not use a fixed budget year. The Utility will calculate the monthly budgeted amount by spreading the estimated annual bill over 11 months, with the last month consisting of any end-of-year adjustments.
B. 
Reconnection billing. All customers whose service is disconnected in accordance with the disconnection rules as outlined in Ch. PSC 113, Wis. Adm. Code, shall be required to pay a reconnection charge. The charge shall be $25 during regular office hours. After regular office hours, the minimum reconnection charge of $25 applies, plus any overtime labor costs, not to exceed a total maximum charge of $50.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
C. 
Reconnection of a seasonal customer's service. Reconnection of a service for a seasonal customer who has been disconnected for less than one year shall be subject to the same reconnection charges outlined above. A seasonal customer shall also be charged for all minimum bills which would have been incurred had the customer not temporarily disconnected service.
D. 
A twenty-five-dollar charge will be applied to the customer's account when a check rendered for Utility service is returned for insufficient funds. This charge may not be in addition to, but may be inclusive of, the Water Utility's insufficient fund charge when the check was for payment of both electric and water service.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
E. 
Average depreciated embedded cost. The embedded cost of the distribution system (excluding the standard transformer and service facilities) is determined by the Public Service Commission for each customer classification. The average depreciated embedded cost by customer classification is as follows.[3]
(1) 
Residential service: $395.
(2) 
Apartment and rental units separately metered: $395 per unit metered.
(3) 
Subdividers and residential developers: $395 per unit.
(4) 
General service (including multiunit dwellings if billed on one meter): $825.
(5) 
Power service: $103 per kW (Cp-1) and $66.75 per kW (Cp-2) of average billed demand.
(6) 
Streetlighting: $2.50.
[3]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).
A. 
Under provisions of 1999 Wisconsin Act 9 and 2005 Wisconsin Act 141, a municipal electric utility shall charge each customer a low-income assistance and energy efficiency fee. Fifty percent of the fees charged by the municipal utility shall be used for low-income assistance programs, and the remainder will be used for energy efficiency programs. Low-income programs may include assistance to low-income households for weatherization and other energy conservation services, payment of energy bills, or early identification or prevention of energy crises. Energy efficiency programs may include those programs designed to reduce the demand for natural gas or electricity or improving the efficiency of its use during any period.
B. 
Pursuant to §§ 16.957(5) and 196.374(7), Wis. Stats., each municipal electric utility must collect an average of $16 per meter per year. The actual amount of fees paid by a customer cannot exceed the lesser of 3% of all other billed electric charges or $750 per month. These fees are not subject to gross receipts or sales taxes. A municipal utility may determine the amount that a particular class of customers is required to pay and may charge different fees to different classes of customers.
C. 
Argyle Municipal Electric Utility, in compliance with these laws, and as of the effective date established below,[2] has set the fees for each retail electric customer rate classification as follows:
Rate Classification
Fee Per Customer Per Month
Rg-1 Residential Service
$1.34
Gs-1 General Service
$1.34
Cp-1 Small Power Service
$1.34
Cp-2 Large Power Service
$1.34
Ms-1 Street Lighting Service
$1.34
[2]
Editor's Note: The effective date for the "Commitment to Community" program rider was indicated as "for service on and after June 17, 2008."
D. 
Argyle Municipal Electric Utility has elected to send 100% of the low-income assistance and energy efficiency fees collected from its retail electric customers to the State of Wisconsin to participate in the state's "Focus on Energy" and low-income energy assistance programs.
E. 
Questions regarding low-income assistance and energy efficiency fees or Argyle Municipal Electric Utility's "Commitment to Community" programs should be directed to Argyle Municipal Electric Utility.
[1]
Editor's Note: Added at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. III).