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Village of Camillus, NY
Onondaga County
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Various land use activities are referred to in the District Use Chart attached to this chapter. Where a specific use, whether or not expressly enumerated in the chart or elsewhere in this chapter, can be construed to fall into two or more categories of uses as enumerated therein, such use shall be subject to the most restrictive controls applicable thereto.
A. 
Special permit required. Land use activities which possess critical impact shall require the issuance of a special permit by the Village Board of Trustees.
B. 
Standards for determination. Critical impact shall constitute any land use activity having any one or more of the following characteristics:
(1) 
Involves an area of land, whether or not in contiguous parcels, in excess of 40,000 square feet.
(2) 
Involves the development of new structure(s) with a floor area, cumulative of all floors, in excess of 20,000 square feet contained in all structures associated with the use.
(3) 
Involves vehicular activity as defined herein.
(4) 
Involves the use of a principal or accessory structure exceeding three stories in height in the C District or 35 feet in the R-1, R-2 or R-3 District.
(5) 
Involves the employment of more than 50 persons at maximum shift.
(6) 
Involves the creation of over 10 units of off-street parking spaces in a residential district or over 25 spaces in any other district, whether or not required by the applicable regulations in this chapter.
(7) 
Involves the creation of over four loading units, whether or not required by the applicable regulations of this chapter.
(8) 
Involves the development, redevelopment or change in use of any activities situated within an area designated as a flood hazard area or within 500 feet of Nine Mile Creek.
(9) 
Involves the development, redevelopment or treatment of any other activity involving land use under the direct control of the United States of America, the State of New York, the County of Onondaga, the Village of Camillus or any agency thereof, including special districts.
(10) 
Involves public assembly activities wherein the maximum capacity exceeds 100 persons, as determined by an examination of fixed seating or occupancy limitations contained in any applicable regulations.
(11) 
Involves facilities designed to provide consumer services for persons on the premises and while remaining in motor vehicles, including what are commonly termed "drive-in windows."
(12) 
Involves the improvement of a lot with two or more principal structures, also denoted as "multistructure development."
(13) 
Involves land disturbance as defined in Article II of this chapter.
(14) 
Involves the creation of any townhouse dwelling unit.
[Added 7-3-1990 by L.L. No. 2-1990]
(15) 
Involves the establishment of a mixed-use dwelling unit within a Commercial Zoning District or the reestablishment of any such mixed-use dwelling unit within a Commercial Zoning District after a residential vacancy of 18 months or more.
[Added 5-4-2004 by L.L. No. 1-2004]
(16) 
Involves the improvement of a lot with an indoor self-storage facility.
[Added 11-21-2016 by L.L. No. 6-2016]
[Added 1-16-2011 by L.L. No. 1-2011]
A. 
Establishment and intent. This section establishes standards specific to the Village Center Zoning Overlay District. The design standards provide applicants and the Village Board with guidance as to the types of development, improvements and uses desired for the area to be referred to as the "Village Center," such area described at Exhibit A[1] attached hereto, and consisting generally of the parcels or parts thereof within the Village business center contiguous to Genesee (Main) Street. The intent of these standards is to encourage the development of structures and uses that are compatible with their surroundings; that provide attractive facades and historically consistent front and attractive rear entrances; that will encourage redevelopment and use of the Village Center as the center of local commerce and community activity; and that will minimize or avoid adverse impacts. Where noted, and as otherwise inferred herein, development and restoration shall intend to preserve, restore or recreate, as the case may be, building facades consistent with the Village of Camillus (generally), circa 1900, thus including, wherever possible, however subject to the modification provisions hereof, the following design and architectural features: exterior materials, windows, doorway and entrances, facades, walls, roofs, colors and finishes, awnings and canopies, signage, exterior lighting, landscaping and streetscaping, mechanical systems, parking lots and driveways, and open spaces.
[1]
Editor's Note: Exhibit A is on file in the Village offices.
B. 
Application and modification of standards. The Village Board in connection with review and approval of a project or site over which it has jurisdiction (special permit or site plan) may apply the standards herein, thereby superseding those area and dimensional requirements of the underlying zone (zoning) district, and/or may modify or waive certain of the standards herein upon its written finding that such supersession, modification or waiver is warranted. Circumstances that shall warrant same may include, but not necessarily be limited to, physical constraints such as the location of existing buildings or changes in grade between adjacent properties; excessive cost; failure to obtain an agreement or permit that is required for the implementation of the standards, mitigation by imposition of alternative elements consistent with these standards and/or modifications of the standards to a design consistent with development of projects or property approved subsequent to the establishment of these standards, and which development is otherwise consistent with the Comprehensive Plan of the Village, including as it may be amended from time to time, formally or otherwise, by the Village Board, and including specifically any planned development district established under § 110-21B. In reviewing any proposed modification, the Village Board shall consider whether granting the modification will be consistent with the purposes of this chapter, the Village Comprehensive Plan, and the following principles:
[Amended 8-11-2011 by L.L. No. 3-2011]
(1) 
The general design and character of the proposal is in harmony with the existing or intended neighboring properties in the district.
(2) 
The scale of the proposal in relation to the site and existing or intended neighboring properties.
(3) 
The similarity of building materials and their color and texture in relation to those found or intended for use in the same and surrounding district.
(4) 
The visual compatibility of the proposal with the existing or intended for surrounding properties, including height, setbacks, roof shape, window and door arrangements, and the orientation of the building in relation to the street.
C. 
Main Street corridor. The standards for this overlay district shall apply to, and the overlay district shall include, those parcels and properties situate along Main (Genesee) Street from approximately 270 feet east of the easternmost street line of Bingham Place westerly to approximately 265 feet west of the westernmost streetline of North Street. The lands within this overlay district are specifically as shown on Exhibit A[2] attached hereto and made a part hereof (crosshatched areas), the same being a copy of the Village Zoning Map.[3] The objective of the design standards within the Main Street Corridor is to promote the establishment or continuity of one type of traditional main street corridor from Newport Road to the aforementioned westerly end of the corridor, and a distinctly different, but compatible, part of the corridor from (approximately) Newport Road easterly to just beyond Bingham Place (as shown on Exhibit A).
[2]
Editor's Note: Exhibit A is on file in the Village offices.
[3]
Editor's Note: A copy of the Zoning Map is attached to this chapter.
D. 
Characteristics.
(1) 
A "traditional main street" is generally composed of one- to three-story buildings with retail uses on the street level and office or residential uses on the upper levels. The diverse retail establishments on the ground floor attract the most pedestrian circulation, promoting the community atmosphere, while the architecture style and rooflines create an urban architectural theme. Architecturally and aesthetically, in the Village of Camillus the traditional main street composition changes with respect to the portion of the corridor between Newport Road and Bingham Place. There a more residential character and residential-dwelling-type structures predominate; however, with the intent nevertheless to be that diverse small-scale retail, small/home business and professional office and personal services establishments dominate first floor uses and with some residential uses surviving, as well as where otherwise permitted, on second story and back areas.
(2) 
A traditional main street corridor should adequately convey traffic; however, it should also have ample sidewalks and landscape and functional areas to promote a high level of pedestrian activity. Primary shop entrances would be located on Main Street through recessed doors. Street-side parking would be convenient, but relatively minimal, so as not to interfere with the active pedestrian quality. Most parking and loading would be accommodated in the rear along with secondary entrances for the shops. In cases like the Village of Camillus, where rear parking areas can also create access to Main Street, abutting properties to the rear and attractive potential parklike features, special attention should be given to ensuring that secondary entrances and rear building facades are as attractive thus suggesting a semi-enclosed bazaar-like atmosphere at the rear of such properties. Likewise, parking at the rear of such properties, while needing to accommodate patrons, should be offset from such rear building areas to allow pedestrian access and mobility and possibly outdoor patio and similar service areas for patrons. Providing for easy access while ensuring attractive open storefronts will help the resurgence of Main Street as a desirable place to do business.
(3) 
In applying the planning standards hereunder and any recommendations thereto, the Village Board shall consider and may also incorporate such planning concepts and guidelines as are detailed in the Onondaga County Settlement Plan of 2001 prepared by Duany Plater - Zyberk & Company, Architects and Town Planners, and Environmental Design and Research, Local Planners, for the Syracuse - Onondaga County Planning Agency, and as same may be revised from time to time, and the concept layout of Dunn and Sgromo Engineers, P.C. (3 pages), specifically Drawing No. EX1.0, entitled "Village Center Overlay District" (undated); Drawing No. PD1.0, entitled "Proposed Development" (undated), and drawing referencing "Traditional Storefront Characteristics" and "Relationship to Street" (unnumbered and undated), copies of which are attached hereto as Exhibits B-1, B-2 and B-3, respectively, and which are on file at the office of the Village Clerk.
E. 
Design standards.
(1) 
Design standards for this district are as described at this subsection and at Subsections F and G following. The primary objective of these standards are to create a traditional Main Street but with additional features distinct to the Village. New, reconstructed and restored buildings must relate to a traditional main street design as well as enhance the positive qualities that currently exist. As applied to a specific project or site by the respective board of the Village having jurisdiction over the site or project, the specific dimensional, area and lot coverage requirements of the Village Code in Commercial Districts may be waived, and as so waived shall not apply and are superseded by the general requirements set forth at Subsection F.
(2) 
Existing or future (resulting from required demolitions) gaps in the street walls should be mended by use of ornamental fencing and screening devices and plantings, unless such gaps are intended to be used for alleys. Access should be made as convenient as possible without sacrificing the atmosphere of a public gathering place. Therefore, pedestrian connections to rear parking and service areas shall be provided via through-store passages. Parking provided primarily in the rear but offset for rear pedestrian and service area reduces street congestion, provides convenient vehicle storage, and promotes a pedestrian-friendly corridor in the Main Street atmosphere. The rear parking lot frontage can also provide for an opportunity to add greater diversity to the Village Center by making it an active location of secondary businesses and office uses.
(3) 
In applying the design standards hereunder and any recommendations thereto, the Village Board shall consider and may also incorporate such design and architectural guidelines as are detailed in the Onondaga County Settlement Plan of 2001 prepared by Duany Plater - Zyberk & Company, Architects and Town Planners, and Environmental Design and Research, Local Planners, for the Syracuse - Onondaga County Planning Agency, and as same may be revised from time to time, and the concept layout of Dunn and Sgromo Engineers, P.C. (3 pages), specifically Drawing No. EX1.0, entitled "Village Center Overlay District" (undated); Drawing No. PD1.0, entitled "Proposed Development" (undated), and drawing referencing "Traditional Storefront Characteristics" and "Relationship to Street" (unnumbered and undated), copies of which are attached hereto as Exhibits B-1, B-2 and B-3, respectively, and which are on file at the office of the Village Clerk.
F. 
Streetscape elements.
(1) 
Mandatory frontage. To promote pedestrian interest and continuity, the street-level shops shall be retail, office, professional office, gallery, personal service establishment, and restaurant with limited (secondary) alcohol beverage service along the Main Street corridor (i.e., from Newport Road to Elm Street).
(2) 
Building height. A two-story minimum height and two- or three-story maximum height limit should be maintained for the entire corridor as well as 150 feet from each side of the Main Street corridor.
(3) 
Building line setbacks. Buildings shall normally be to the front lot line of Main Street, with recesses for storefront entryways and pedestrian features. This shall not apply to property located within the district east of Newport Road, except where existing structures maintain this placement. Up to 50% of the build-to line may be interrupted by recesses at least 18 inches deep/three feet wide and no more than 10 feet deep, provided that the build-to line is regained on both sides of the recess. In cases where existing conditions may prevent meeting these requirements, streetscape elements (landscape, wrought iron fencing and the like, etc.) or building additions should be added to achieve the desired affect. The otherwise required Commercial District setbacks shall not apply to the extent required to achieve the objectives of this overlay district. As such, in connection with a site plan approval, setbacks other than as provided for the Commercial District may be approved for reasons articulated in the approval resolution and/or as provided under § 7-712-b of the (New York State) Village Law.
(4) 
Corner effects. Corners of a building at alley and street intersections provide an opportunity to improve the character and continuity and must be designed so that visibility is not cut off.
(5) 
Store entrances. Individual store entrances should be spaced between five feet and 30 feet. This promotes continuity and vitality while maintaining safety.
(6) 
Alleys. In order to facilitate fewer curb cuts, where possible, alleys permitting vehicle access/egress using existing curb cuts should be used for access to parking lots behind buildings.
(7) 
Street trees. Trees lining the streets are characteristic of main streets, especially when combined with build-to lines. Minimum three-inch-caliper trees should be planted every 20 feet in a five-foot-wide landscape planting strip located between the sidewalk and the asphalt. A combination of trees types may be used, and each variety should be tolerant of urban conditions, especially salt and sand deposited with snow removal. Tree types should not shield visibility of lower building fronts but should be sufficient to assist in breaking up the building line. Protective grates shall be placed around the base of each tree for protection. Decorative brick or pavement design is encouraged surrounding protective grates. Additional low-lying landscape and flower bed features should be situate within the landscape strip and between any building and sidewalk area.
(8) 
Sidewalks. Sidewalks should be not less than five feet wide and ADA compliant. They are to be placed between the building and the tree planting and green area strip.
(9) 
Streetlights. Pedestrian-scale low-lighting lanterns indicative of the historical period should be provided to add character and illumination. These should be in addition to existing streetlights which are intended to serve vehicular traffic.
(10) 
Awnings. Matching, retractable, fire-retardant awnings will provide thematic character along the Main Street corridor as well as shelter. The awnings should be mounted at a consistent height of seven to 7.5 feet above the sidewalk and may, in addition, be mounted relative to single and double windows at higher building locations. Awnings are considered temporary structures and exempt from setback requirements.
(11) 
Drive-through windows. Drive-through windows should generally be discouraged; however, where reasonably necessary for a permitted use, same may be placed in rear, existing private alley or building corner locations subject to landscape and screening measures as approved by the Village.
G. 
Architectural elements. Providing architectural guidelines will further ensure the desired effect of continuity and unity throughout the corridor. Building height, cornice lines, window patterns, shop fronts, etc., are elements that can be related in order to create a sense of place. New buildings should reference the positive, desirable features of existing buildings.
(1) 
Principal features.
(a) 
Street-level continuity of shop fronts.
(b) 
Street-level expression line, pulling together the ground-level shop fronts, while providing distinction from the upper stories.
(c) 
Three-story height limit, with a two-story minimum encouraged.
(d) 
Flat roofs with symmetrically shaped parapet roofs.
(e) 
Symmetrical window spacing and windows in proportion to one another.
(f) 
Similar signage.
(g) 
Matching awnings at similar heights.
(h) 
Recognition and imposition of historical Village of Camillus (circa 1900) building features.
(i) 
Renovations/replacements to residential and residential character properties (generally east of Newport Road) to maintain such residential, residential character and historical features.
(2) 
General design. The following architectural designs and details should be incorporated to encourage building design diversity, break up the mass of larger buildings, and create a strong pedestrian orientation.
(a) 
New buildings should maintain the predominant scale of other buildings in the district. New buildings should respect the predominant height of buildings within the area. One-story buildings and buildings of more than three stories are considered inappropriate.
(b) 
Architectural detail should be incorporated into the ground-floor facade in order to create an easily identifiable and welcoming entrance. This is typically accomplished through recessed entries placed between two display windows; decorative or distinctive entryway paving; bulkheads of contrasting materials – note that bulkheads should not extend higher than 30 inches from the ground plane; and/or perpendicular signage or awnings placed directly over the entrance.
(c) 
Primary entrances should be oriented toward the street.
(d) 
The building's design should create visual separation between the lower facade and the upper facade. Some design elements that are particularly successful in creating this separation include utilizing canopies, varying textures, varying window patterns, and incorporating signage or storefront cornices. Signage extending above the first story of a building is discouraged.
(e) 
Include design elements such as window bays, columns, awnings, changes in material or texture, and window and entrance design and placement in a way that serves to break up the massing of the building.
(f) 
Details on existing buildings, such as transoms, decorative cornices, pilasters or columns, are encouraged and should not be covered up or removed from existing buildings.
(g) 
Exterior materials should be durable and of high quality. On facades that are easily visible from the street(s), synthetic materials that mimic natural materials (such as vinyl siding, dryvit®, concrete block or faux brick) are discouraged and will be permitted only in limited areas of the building. All material shall be durable and chosen to lend a historically appropriate appearance.
(h) 
Mechanical equipment should be located on the rear of buildings or on the roof and be properly screened.
(i) 
Upper stories should incorporate window patterns and designs that are compatible with and complimentary to existing upper-story window patterns of adjacent buildings.
(j) 
Existing windows, transoms or sidelights are important scale and character elements and should not be covered up or changed in size unless in an effort to restore the original appearance of the building. Transparent glazing should be retained and not replaced with translucent glass or any opaque material.
(k) 
Roof design should be functional and in-scale and character with the building and the community.
(3) 
Colors and finishes. Colors used for buildings, facades, signs and awnings in the Central Commercial District must comply with the following guidelines:
(a) 
Colors of exterior materials, signs, window frames, cornices, storefronts, and other building features shall be coordinated and harmonized with each other.
(b) 
Colors chosen for an entire facade or building should relate to and be considerate of the color of the adjacent buildings as well as the character of the streetscape.
(c) 
Colors that appear overly bright shall not be used, either for building features or for entire facades. Note that the appearance of brightness will vary depending upon the amount used.
(d) 
A building's overall color scheme, including signs, awnings, canopies, facades and trim, shall be limited to three colors.
(e) 
Where color contrast is desired, limit the use of secondary colors to doorways, window trim, awnings and canopies.
(f) 
"Historic colors" paints are to be used.
(g) 
If a building's condition requires that paint be applied over materials such as brick, brownstone, etc., the paint shall be chosen with a view to its resemblance to the building's original natural tones.
(4) 
Signage. The signs of individual establishments should be centered above each respective shop front, two feet above the awning. There should also be provided a sign in front of each entrance that hangs perpendicular to the building under the canopy (providing signage for pedestrians). Translucent, backlit signs should be discouraged. Engraved wooden and similar traditional or historically consistent signs are recommended. Individual signs are subject to approval in accordance with the Village's sign ordinance. Signs or awnings should not, under most circumstances, be attached to a building in such a way that obscures or damages significant architectural elements of the building.
(5) 
Front areas. A minimum of 60% of the front areas should be clear glass, beginning within 24 inches from above the sidewalk, to enable visibility into the stores and/or display windows. Where the full shop front area is expressed architecturally utilizing framing and infill panels of wood or other approved shop front materials, a minimum clear glass area of at least 40% should be required, starting within 36 inches from above the sidewalk. Dark or reflective tinted glass shall not be acceptable along the Main Street frontage. Paper displays and posters attached to windows should not be permissible except as permitted under Village Code for temporary displays or signage.
(6) 
Through passage. Retail, service and similar establishments serving the public that connect to both Main Street and the rear parking lot shall endeavor to provide access to both. This allows for pedestrian through passage, encouraging both pedestrian traffic and rear parking.
(7) 
Rear areas. In order to encourage use of the rear parking areas along the Main Street corridor and to further encourage development and use of secondary structures and properties to the rear of such parking areas as well as the beneficial use and improvements to the rear of properties situate adjacent to Main Street.