City of Newburgh, NY
Orange County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
A. 
The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established the national historic preservation program, which operates as a decentralized partnership between the federal government and the state. The 1980 amendments to the National Historic Preservation Act authorized the Certified Local Government (CLG) program, a federal-state-local preservation partnership. Under this program, the Secretary of the Interior certifies local governments as CLGs if they meet several requirements developed by the National Park Service and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO).
B. 
To maintain CLG status, the City must adhere to requirements which include maintenance of a local historic preservation commission with the power to designate or recommend designation of historic properties; provide historic preservation guidance; and approve or disapprove demolition, relocation, new construction, or exterior alteration affecting designated properties within its jurisdiction.
C. 
Based on the above authority, and inasmuch as the City of Newburgh has many significant historic, architectural and cultural resources which constitute its heritage, this section is intended to establish an Architectural Review Commission to:
(1) 
Foster public knowledge, understanding, and appreciation in the beauty and character of the City of Newburgh, and in the accomplishments of its past;
(2) 
Ensure the harmonious, orderly, and efficient growth and development of the City;
(3) 
Enhance the visual character of the City by encouraging new design and construction that complements the City's historic buildings;
(4) 
Protect and promote the economic benefits of historic preservation to the City, its inhabitants and visitors;
(5) 
Protect property values in the City;
(6) 
Promote and encourage continued private ownership and stewardship of historic structures;
(7) 
Identify as early as possible and resolve conflicts between the preservation of historic landmarks/districts and alternative land uses; and
(8) 
Conserve valuable material and energy resources by ongoing use and maintenance of the existing built environment.
D. 
Scope. In 1977 the Newburgh City Council designated the East End Historic District. In 1985 the district was enlarged and added to the National Register of Historic Places. The Colonial Terraces was added and Design Guidelines adopted by City Council in 2005.
A. 
Creation and membership. There is hereby continued a Commission to be known as the "City of Newburgh Architectural Review Commission (ARC)." The ARC shall consist of seven members to be appointed by the City Manager as follows:
(1) 
At least one shall be an historian; such member may be a nonresident of the City.
(2) 
At least three shall be residents of an historic district or architectural design district established within the City or residents of a designated individual landmark building.
(3) 
At least one shall be an architect; such member may be a nonresident of the City.
(4) 
All should have demonstrated significant interest in and commitment to the field of historic preservation or architecture evidenced by involvement in a local or regional historic preservation group, employment or volunteer activity in the field of preservation planning, or other serious undertaking in the field of historic preservation.
(5) 
Except as provided above, all members shall be residents and shall have an interest in historic preservation and architectural development within the City of Newburgh.
(6) 
In the event that individuals cannot be identified to fulfill the qualifications of Subsection A(1), (2), (3) or (4) above, members who fulfill Subsection A(4) may be appointed.
B. 
Members shall serve terms of five years from their most recent appointment.
C. 
Two alternate members of the ARC shall be appointed by the City Manager for terms of two years, commencing on the date of appointment. These members shall serve when members are absent or unable to participate on an application before the ARC. The Chairman of the ARC may designate an alternate substitute for a member when such member is unable to participate on an application or matter before the Commission. When so designated, the alternate member shall possess all the powers and responsibilities of such member of the Commission. Such designation shall be entered into the minutes of every ARC meeting at which the substitution is made. All provisions of state law and local law, codes, rules and regulations relating to ARC member eligibility, vacancy in office, or removal, compatibility of office and service on other boards, as well as any provisions of any local law or local ordinance relating to training, continuing education, compensation and attendance, performance of duties, qualifications and others, shall also apply to alternate members.
D. 
Chairman. The Chairman shall be appointed by the City Manager. If the City Manager shall not appoint a Chairman, then the Chairman shall be elected by the members of the ARC.
E. 
Vacancies occurring other than by expiration of term shall be filled for the remainder of the unexpired term in the same manner as the original appointments.
F. 
Meetings. The ARC shall meet at least monthly, but may be held at any time on the written request of the majority of ARC members or on the call of the Chairman.
G. 
Secretary. The secretary is a staff member of the City, and not a voting member of the ARC. The Secretary shall keep and make available to the public on request all records of meeting minutes, attendance, resolutions and reports.
H. 
Quorum. A quorum for the transaction of business shall consist of four of the ARC members. A majority of the full authorized membership is required to grant a certificate of appropriateness or designate a landmark, historic district or architectural design district.
I. 
Training. Each member shall complete a minimum of four hours of training each year, designed to assist the members to be more effective in carrying out their duties.
A. 
The ARC shall exercise aesthetic judgment to maintain the character of historic and architectural design districts, or a landmark, and to prevent construction, reconstruction, alteration or demolition which would be out of harmony with the architectural aesthetics, style, materials, colors, line and details of the district and/or landmark.
B. 
In addition to the aforementioned powers, the powers of the ARC shall include:
(1) 
Adoption of criteria for the identification of significant local historic, architectural, and cultural landmarks and for the delineation of historic districts.
(2) 
Conduct surveys of significant historic, architectural, and cultural landmarks and historic districts within the City.
(3) 
Recommendation to the City Council of the designation of a local building, structure or property or a collection of buildings, structures or properties as a local landmark, historic district or architectural design district, hereafter referred to as "designated properties."
(4) 
Recommendation to the State Historic Preservation Office of the listing of any local landmark for inclusion on the State Register of Historic Places.
(5) 
Increasing public awareness of the value of historic, cultural, and architectural preservation by developing and participating in public education programs.
(6) 
Provision of advice and guidance to owners, contract vendees, and residents of historic districts on financing sources that are available specifically to properties within the historic districts, such as the federal historic rehabilitation tax credit and property tax abatements.
(7) 
Approval or disapproval of applications for certificates of appropriateness pursuant to this article as to designated properties pursuant to this article and as to all changes in exterior features or demolition of designated properties duly established by ordinance of the City, with the exceptions of those changes stated in § 300-40A(5) of this chapter.
The Commission shall delineate landmarks or historic districts and recommend them to the City governing board for designation under local law.
A. 
Local landmark designation.
(1) 
The ARC may make a recommendation to the City Council for the local designation of a structure, building or property as a landmark if it:
(a) 
Exemplifies or possesses special character, or historic or aesthetic interest of value as part of the political, economic, or social history of the City;
(b) 
Is identified with persons or events significant in local, state, or national history;
(c) 
Embodies the distinguishing characteristics of a type, period or method of construction or design style, or is a valuable example of the use of indigenous materials or craftsmanship; or is representative of the work of a designer, architect or builder;
(d) 
Represents an established and familiar visual feature of the community; or
(e) 
Has yielded or may be likely to yield information important in prehistory or history.
(2) 
Notice of a proposed designation shall be sent by certified mail to the owner of the property proposed for designation at the address on file for said property owner with the City Assessor, describing the property proposed and announcing a public hearing by the City Council to consider the designation. The proposal shall also be published at least once in all official newspapers of the City at least five days prior to the date of the public hearing. Once the City Council has issued notice of a proposed designation, no building permit shall be issued by the Building Inspector until the City Council has made its decision.
(3) 
The City Council shall hold a public hearing prior to designation of any local landmark. The ARC, owners, and interested parties may present testimony or documentary evidence at the hearing which will become part of a record regarding the historic, architectural, or cultural importance of the proposed landmark. The record may also contain staff reports, public comments, or other evidence offered outside of the hearing.
(4) 
The City Council shall forward notice of each property designated as a local landmark to the office of the Orange County Clerk for recordation.
(5) 
The location of each local landmark designated henceforth shall be specified in detail and shall be filed, in writing, in the Building Inspector's office for public inspection.
B. 
Historic district or architectural design district.
(1) 
The ARC may recommend to the City Council the designation of a group of properties as a local historic district or architectural design district if the proposed district:
(a) 
Contains properties which meet one or more of the criteria for designation of a landmark; and
(b) 
By reason of possessing such qualities, constitutes a distinct section of the City.
(2) 
Designation of an historic district or architectural design district represents an amendment to this chapter and Zoning Map and shall be done in accordance with procedures contained in § 300-39 of this chapter and in accordance with § 83 of the General City Law of the State of New York.
(3) 
The location of each local historic district or architectural design district designated henceforth shall be specified in detail and shall be filed, in writing, in the Building Inspector's office for public inspection.
(4) 
The location of each historic district or architectural design district shall be shown as an overlay district on the City of Newburgh Zoning Map.
(5) 
The City Council shall forward notice of each designated historic district or architectural design district to the office of the Orange County Clerk for recordation.
A. 
Certificate required.
(1) 
The City of Newburgh Architectural Review Commission is responsible for the approval or disapproval of proposals for exterior changes to an historic property designated under local law. No person shall carry out any exterior alteration, restoration, reconstruction, demolition, new construction, or move of a designated historic landmark or property within a designated historic district without first obtaining a certificate of appropriateness that authorizes such work from the City of Newburgh ARC.
(2) 
The Building Department shall receive and file all applications issued for any individual landmark, or landmarks or historic district to which this chapter applies. The Building Department shall transmit a copy of any such application to the Commission.
(3) 
The Building Department may set up a preliminary review at the request of the applicant, which will include an informational overview of process and requirements.
(4) 
The Commission may require that the application for a certificate of appropriateness (COA) be supplemented by such additional information or materials as may be necessary for a complete review by the Commission. The Commission may impose such reasonable conditions or restrictions as is necessary or appropriate on a case-by-case basis to promote or achieve the purpose of this article.
(5) 
Exemptions: The following activities do not require a certificate of appropriateness under this article:
(a) 
Repair, replacement and installation of electrical, plumbing, heating and ventilation systems, provided that such work does not affect the exterior of the structure.
(b) 
Caulking, weather stripping, glazing and repainting of windows.
(c) 
Repair of porches, cornices, exterior siding, doors, balustrades, stairs or other trim when the repair is done in-kind to match historic material and form.
(d) 
Repair of storm windows (exterior, interior or wood), provided that they match the shape and size of historic windows and that the meeting rail coincides with that of the historic window; color should match the window frame trim.
(e) 
Installation of new window jambs or jamb liners.
(f) 
Repair or replacement of awnings when work is done in-kind to match existing materials and form.
(g) 
Roof repair of historic roofing with materials that match the existing material in form or better.
(h) 
Repair of gutters and downspouts that match the existing material in form or better.
(i) 
Installation of insulation where exterior siding or trim is not altered or damaged and is not inset from the insulation or stays proud of the building plane as intended.
(j) 
Repair of existing roads, driveways, sidewalks and curbs, provided that work is done so that there are no changes in dimension or configuration of those features. Concrete used for sidewalks, curbs and driveway aprons shall be dyed in the mix prior to placing to emulate bluestone in the historic district.
(k) 
Exterior lead paint abatement that includes scraping and repainting of exterior work and masonry surfaces.
(l) 
Repair of fencing when work is done in-kind to match existing material and form.
(m) 
Repair or replacement of water, gas, storm or sewer lines.
(n) 
Emergency repairs necessitated by a casualty to the property (fire, storm, flood, etc.).
B. 
In passing upon an application for a certificate of appropriateness, the ARC shall not consider changes to interior spaces, unless they are open to the public, or to architectural features that are not visible from a public place, public street, or alley, unless the designation of the property in the historic record documents interior features of the property.
C. 
Decisionmaking. The ARC's decision shall be based upon the following principles:
(1) 
Designated properties which contribute to the character of an historic district or architectural design district shall be retained, with their historic or architectural features altered as little as possible.
(2) 
Any alteration of a designated property shall be compatible with its historic character as well as with the surrounding district; and
(3) 
New construction shall be compatible with the district in which it is located and in harmony with the design guidelines established for such district.
(4) 
Items not contemplated at the time of this or other reference publications shall be at the discretion of the ARC.
D. 
Principles of compatibility. The ARC shall consider the following factors:
(1) 
The general design, character, and appropriateness to the property of the proposed alteration or new construction.
(2) 
The scale of the proposed alteration or new construction in relation to the property itself, surrounding properties, and the neighborhood.
(3) 
Texture, materials, and color and their relation to similar features of other properties in the neighborhood.
(4) 
Visual and aesthetic compatibility with surrounding properties, including proportion of the property's front facade, proportion and arrangement of windows and other openings within the facade, roof shape, and the rhythm of spacing of properties in streets, including setback.
(5) 
The importance of historic, architectural or other features to the significance of the property.
(6) 
The proposed action's consistency with design guidelines established for an historic or architectural design district.
E. 
Special demolition considerations. In considering applications for demolition, the ARC shall consider:
(1) 
Whether the building or structure is dangerous to health, safety or life.
(2) 
The extent, significance, and expense of repairs needed to maintain the structure in good repair.
(3) 
The historic value of the structure or property.
(4) 
The contribution of the structure or property to community character, or an existing, locally designated historic or architectural district.
(5) 
The existence and extent of hardship criteria, including whether:
(a) 
The property is incapable of earning a reasonable return, regardless of whether that return represents the most profitable return possible, without being allowed the proposed demolition.
(b) 
The property cannot be adapted for any other use, whether by the current owner or by a purchaser, which would result in a reasonable return, without being allowed the proposed demolition.
(c) 
Efforts to find a purchaser interested in acquiring the property and preserving it have failed.
(6) 
The potential of relocating the building and any other information considered necessary by the ARC.
F. 
Certificate of appropriateness application procedure. Prior to the commencement of any work requiring a certificate of appropriateness, the property owner, or contractor with written authorization of the owner, shall file an application for a building permit with the City of Newburgh Building Inspector and an application for such certificate with the Commission. The application shall contain the following:
(1) 
Name, address, and telephone number of the applicant;
(2) 
Building permit application number as assigned by the Building Department;
(3) 
Location and photographs of property;
(4) 
Name of the NYS registered design professional (i.e., registered architect) hired by the applicant. Unless the residential homeowner creates the drawings him or herself, all drawings submitted by a NYS registered design professional must have the seal and signature of the licensee;
(5) 
Elevation drawings of proposed changes, if available;
(6) 
Perspective drawings, including relationship to adjacent properties, if available;
(7) 
Samples of building materials to be used, including their proposed color;
(8) 
Where the proposal includes signs or lettering, a scale drawing showing the type of lettering to be used, all dimensions and colors, a description of materials to be used, method of illumination, and a plan showing the sign's location on the property; and any other information which the Commission may deem necessary in order to visualize the proposed work;
(9) 
Copies of all SEQRA documents and proceedings.
(10) 
Upon submission of a complete application, the Commission shall have the authority to, without public hearing and notice:
(a) 
Determine whether the proposed work constitutes ordinary maintenance and repair for which a certificate of appropriateness is not required;
(b) 
Approve work which is considered replacement-in-kind;
(c) 
Approve work that is of any other type that has been previously determined by the Commission to be appropriate for delegation to staff.
G. 
Consent agenda.
(1) 
The ARC is empowered to consider and approve multiple applications with a single motion which have been placed on a consent agenda. The decision shall be based on:
(a) 
The nature and extent of the alteration or demolition being proposed.
(b) 
The degree to which the application is in conformance with the appropriate design guidelines.
(c) 
Written consent agenda guidance, approved by the ARC, regarding paint colors, materials, and items generally suitable for specific purposes within the district.
(2) 
Items placed on the consent agenda shall be listed on the ARC's meeting agenda and announced at the meeting. A majority vote of the ARC members present at the meeting may remove an item from the consent agenda and place it on the regular agenda for full consideration by the ARC.
(3) 
The Chair of the ARC shall entertain a motion to approve items placed on the consent agenda upon hearing no objection to the applications remaining on the list.
(4) 
Applicants with items pending on the consent agenda do not need to attend the ARC meeting at which their application is being considered.
H. 
No building permit shall be issued for such proposed work until a certificate of appropriateness has first been issued by the ARC. The certificate of appropriateness required by this section shall be in addition to and not in lieu of any building permit that may be required by any other ordinance of the City of Newburgh.
I. 
In such cases when the current property owner does not plan on carrying out the work applied for, but rather wants to transfer the COA approval to a subsequent owner, the ARC approval shall be conditioned upon completion of the approved scope of work within a reasonable time frame or 24 months. Renewals of such conditions may be granted at the sole discretion of the ARC upon application at least 30 days prior to the expiration of the time limit.
J. 
The ARC shall approve, deny, or approve with modifications the application for a certificate within 60 days from the closing of the public hearing, if any, and otherwise within 60 days from the receipt of the completed application. The ARC shall hold a public hearing on the application at which an opportunity will be provided for proponents and opponents of the application to present their views. Notice of such public hearing shall be published in the official newspaper of the City of Newburgh at least five days prior to said hearing.
(1) 
A public hearing shall not be required for an application limited to approval of paint color or repair or maintenance of a building or structure or property that does not involve the alteration or removal of any exterior feature.
(2) 
A public hearing shall not be required for items on the consent agenda.
K. 
All decisions of the ARC shall be in writing. A copy shall be sent to the applicant by regular mail and a copy filed with the Building Inspector's office for public inspection.
A. 
An applicant whose certificate of appropriateness for a proposed alteration of a landmark property has been denied may apply for relief on the grounds of economic hardship. In order to prove the existence of economic hardship related to a proposed alteration, the applicant shall establish that the denial of a certificate of appropriateness will prevent the property owner from earning a reasonable return on investment, regardless of whether that return represents the most profitable return possible.
B. 
Consultation; plan development. The applicant shall consult in good faith with the Commission, local preservation groups, and other interested parties in a diligent effort to seek an alternative that will result in appropriate preservation of the property. The consulting parties may include interested purchasers, as well as preservation and other interested organizations, public agencies, developers, real estate agents and individuals who may be instrumental in developing an economically feasible solution.
C. 
Economic hardship; criteria. Following the denial of a certificate of appropriateness, the applicant may request a certificate of economic hardship. In all cases other than a proposed demolition, removal or relocation, the applicant shall prove the existence of economic hardship by demonstrating to the Commission that:
(1) 
The applicant cannot realize a reasonable return if compliance with the Commission's decision is required; provided, however, that the lack of reasonable return is proven by the applicant to be substantial as demonstrated by competent financial evidence;
(2) 
The alleged hardship relating to the property in question is unique, and does not apply to a substantial portion of the district or neighborhood;
(3) 
The requested relief, if granted, will not alter the essential character of the neighborhood; and
(4) 
The alleged hardship has not been self-created.
D. 
The Commission, in the granting of a certificate of economic hardship, shall grant the minimum terms deemed necessary and adequate to address the unnecessary hardship proven by the applicant, and at the same time preserve and protect the character of the neighborhood and the health safety and welfare of the community.
E. 
Public hearing.
(1) 
The Commission may hold a public hearing on the hardship application at which an opportunity will be provided for the applicant and public to present their views on the hardship application.
(2) 
If no public hearing is held, the Commission must render a decision on the hardship application within 62 days following its receipt of a complete application.
(a) 
A complete application includes the conclusion of all activities under Subsection C initiated to consult with necessary parties to determine whether the property may be preserved or rehabilitated in a manner that alleviates the hardship that would otherwise result while substantially accomplishing the goals of this chapter.
(b) 
A complete application also includes receipt by the Commission of all submissions necessary to meet the applicant's burden of proof.
(3) 
Following the submission of a complete application, the Commission may schedule a public hearing within a reasonable time and determine within 62 days following the close of any public hearing held on the application whether the applicant has met his or her burden of proof.
F. 
Commission decision.
(1) 
If the Commission finds that the applicant's burden of proof has not been met, the Commission shall deny the application for a certificate of economic hardship.
(2) 
If the Commission finds that the applicant's burden of proof has been met, the Commission shall issue a preliminary determination of economic hardship within 62 days of the close of any public hearing held on the application or within 62 days after the Commission has received a complete application.
(3) 
Within 62 calendar days following the Commission's preliminary determination of economic hardship the Commission must make a final determination.
(4) 
A decision of the Commission on the hardship application shall be in writing and shall state the reasons for granting or denying it. A copy shall be sent to the applicant by certified mail/return receipt requested or courier service with proof of delivery or personal service with proof of delivery and a copy filed with the City Clerk's office for public inspection.
G. 
No building permit or other land use approvals shall be issued unless the Commission grants the hardship application. If the hardship application is granted, the Commission shall approve only such work as is necessary to alleviate the hardship.
A. 
Demolition of an individual landmark or of a structure located in and contributing to the significance of an historic district shall be allowed only in case of economic hardship, unless the Building Department, upon due deliberation has made an express written finding that the structure presents an imminent threat to the public health, safety and welfare.
B. 
Any person desiring to demolish a designated historic building shall first file an application for an historic building demolition permit with the Building Department and an application for such certificate with the Commission. An applicant must submit the following items:
(1) 
Current level of economic return;
(2) 
Amount paid for the property, date of purchase, party from whom purchased, and relationship between the owner of record, the applicant, and person from whom property was purchased;
(3) 
Annual gross and net income from the property for the previous three years; itemized operating and maintenance expenses for the previous three-years, and depreciation deduction and annual cash flow before and after debt service, if any, during the same period;
(4) 
Remaining balance on the mortgage or other financing secured by the property and annual debt-service, if any, during the prior three years;
(5) 
Real estate taxes for the previous four years and assessed value of the property according to the two most recent assessed valuations;
(6) 
All appraisals obtained within the last two years by the owner or applicant in connection with the purchase, financing, or ownership of the property;
(7) 
Form of ownership or operation of the property, whether sole proprietorship, for-profit or not-for-profit corporation, limited partnership, joint venture, or other;
(8) 
Any state or federal income tax returns relating to the property for the last two years;
(9) 
Any listing of property for sale or rent, price asked, and offers received, if any, within the previous two years, including testimony and relevant documents regarding:
(a) 
Any real estate broker or firm engaged to sell or lease the property;
(b) 
Reasonableness of price or rent sought by the applicant; or
(c) 
Any advertisements placed for the sale or rent of the property;
(10) 
Feasibility of alternative uses for the property that could earn a reasonable return;
(11) 
Report from a licensed engineer or architect with experience in rehabilitation as to the structural soundness of any buildings on the property and their suitability for rehabilitation;
(12) 
Cost estimates for the proposed construction, alteration, demolition, or removal, and an estimate of any additional cost that would be incurred to comply with the requirements for a certificate of appropriateness;
(13) 
Estimated market value of the property:
(a) 
In its current condition;
(b) 
After completion of the proposed alteration or demolition; and
(c) 
After renovation of the existing property for continued use;
(14) 
Expert testimony or opinion on the feasibility of rehabilitation or reuse of the existing structure by an architect, developer, real estate consultant, appraiser, and/or other real estate professional experienced in historic properties and rehabilitation;
(15) 
Any evidence of self-created hardship through deliberate neglect or inadequate maintenance of the property; and
(16) 
Economic incentives and/or funding available to the applicant through federal, state, City, or private programs.
C. 
Demolition of any such building may be approved only in connection with approval of a replacement project.
D. 
The Commission shall hold a public hearing and shall take one of the following actions:
(1) 
Approve the demolition permit in conformance with the provisions of Subsection F of this section below.
(2) 
Approve the demolition hardship permit subject to a waiting period of up to 120 days to consider relocation/documentation.
(3) 
Deny the permit.
E. 
During the continuance period, the Commission may investigate relocation of the building (on site) or modification of the building for future uses in a way which preserves the architectural and historical integrity of the building.
F. 
Demolition, removal or relocation hardship criteria.
(1) 
Certificate of appropriateness for demolition, removal or relocation. An applicant whose certificate of appropriateness for a proposed demolition, removal or relocation of a landmark, resource or property has been denied may apply for relief on the grounds of economic hardship. In order to prove the existence of economic hardship sufficient to justify demolition, removal, or relocation, the applicant shall establish that the denial of a certificate of appropriateness will prevent the property owner from earning a reasonable return on investment, regardless of whether that return represents the most profitable return possible.
(2) 
Certificate of appropriateness for demolition.
(a) 
The applicant for a certificate of appropriateness for demolition must establish to the Commission's satisfaction an imminent plan of reuse or redevelopment of the affected property. The applicant for an income-producing property shall establish that:
[1] 
The property is incapable of earning a reasonable return, regardless of whether that return represents the most profitable return possible; and
[2] 
The property cannot be adapted for any other use, whether by the current owner or by a purchaser, which would result in a reasonable return; and
[3] 
Efforts to find a purchaser interested in acquiring the property and preserving it have failed.
(b) 
In deciding upon such application for removal, relocation or demolition, the Commission may consider whether the owner has created his own hardship through waste and neglect, thereby permitting the property to fall into a serious state of disrepair.
(3) 
Before approving the removal, relocation or demolition of an individual landmark or structure within an historic district, the Commission may suspend the application for up to 180 days to allow the applicant to consult in good faith with the Commission, local preservation groups, and the public in a diligent effort to seek a less intrusive alternative to demolition.
A. 
Enforcement. All work performed pursuant to a certificate of appropriateness issued under this article shall conform to the requirements stated in the certificate or reasonably implied therein. It shall be the duty of the Building Inspector to periodically inspect any such work to assure compliance with the certificate and all applicable law. In the event any requirement included in the certificate of appropriateness has not been met, or upon notification of that fact by the Architectural Review Commission, the Building Inspector shall issue a stop-work order and all work shall immediately cease. No further work shall be undertaken on the project as long as a stop-work order is in effect.
B. 
Any owner or person in charge of a property who demolishes, alters, constructs, or permits a designated property to fall into a serious state of disrepair in violation of this chapter in the absence of a certificate of appropriateness, a finding of economic hardship, or other approval by the Commission, may be required by the City Council to restore the property and its site to its appearance prior to the violation.
C. 
Maintenance required. Nothing in this article shall be construed to prevent the ordinary maintenance and repair of any exterior architectural feature of a landmark or property within an historic district which does not involve a change in the design, material, color, or outward appearance. No owner or person with an interest in a designated property shall permit the property to fall into a serious state of disrepair so as to result in the deterioration of any exterior architectural or historic feature which would, in the judgment of the ARC, produce a detrimental effect upon the character of an historic or architectural district as a whole or the life and character of a landmark. Examples of such deterioration include:
(1) 
Deterioration of exterior walls or other vertical supports;
(2) 
Deterioration of roofs and other horizontal members;
(3) 
Deterioration of exterior chimneys;
(4) 
Deterioration or crumbling of exterior stucco or mortar;
(5) 
Ineffective waterproofing of exterior walls, roofs, or foundations, including broken windows or doors; and
(6) 
Deterioration of any features so as to create a hazardous condition which could lead to a claim that demolition is necessary for the public safety.
D. 
Violations. If, in the judgment of the Commission, a violation exists that will result in a detrimental effect upon the life and character of a designated historic resource, landmark, property or on the character of an historic district as a whole, the Commission shall notify the Building Inspector. If, upon investigation, the Building Inspector finds noncompliance with the requirements of the Property Maintenance Code of the New York State Fire Prevention and Building Code, or any other applicable law or regulation, the Building Inspector shall order such remedies as are necessary and consistent with this chapter and shall provide written notice thereof to the Secretary of the Commission.
E. 
Penalties.
(1) 
Failure to comply with any of the provisions of this article shall be deemed a violation, and upon conviction the violator shall be liable to a fine of not less than $500 or 15 days in jail, or both for each day the violation continues.
(2) 
Any person who demolishes, alters, constructs or permits a designated property to fall into a serious state of disrepair in violation of this article shall be required to restore the property and its site to its appearance prior to the violation. An action to enforce this subsection may be brought by the City in any court of competent jurisdiction. This civil remedy shall be in addition to and not in lieu of any criminal prosecution and penalty.
F. 
Appeals. Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Commission relating to a certificate of economic hardship or a certificate of appropriateness may, within 15 days of the decision, file a written appeal to the City governing board for review of the decision. Appellate review shall be based on the same record that was before the Commission and using the same criteria in this article.
G. 
Termination of certificate of appropriateness: An approved certificate of appropriateness shall terminate and become void if there is no building or demolition permit filed with Building Inspector as per §§ 300-11 and 300-12 of this chapter, within 24 months of the date of approval.
A. 
Design guidelines. The City Council, by resolution, may adopt design guidelines for any historic or architectural design district. Said design guidelines shall be drafted with the input and participation of the ARC and owners of property located within the district. A public hearing shall be held prior to the adoption of design guidelines, and notice of said public hearing shall be in accordance with § 300-39.
B. 
The ARC, in its deliberations, shall be guided by design guidelines that have been duly adopted by the City Council in any review authorized herein.
C. 
The East End Historic District. The ARC, in its deliberations, shall be guided by the East End Historic District Guidelines, duly adopted by the City Council by Ordinance No. 2-2008, dated February 25, 2008 and by the City Council's adoption of the CLG update scheduled for 2015.
D. 
Colonial Terraces Architectural Design District. The ARC, in its deliberations, shall be guided by the Colonial Terraces Design Guidelines duly adopted by the City Council by Ordinance No. 3-2005, dated June 20, 2005.