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City of Kirkwood, MO
St. Louis County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[Ord. No. 8173, § 1, 12-3-1992; Ord. No. 8512, § 1, 5-16-1996]
An Architectural Review Board is hereby created and established for the purpose of promoting high standards of architectural design, thereby serving the general welfare of the community. The Architectural Review Board will review building plans for new construction, exterior renovations, or additions as designated by this Division as well as the City of Kirkwood Zoning Code.[1] The Architectural Review Board will also review certain signs in all zoning districts. The intent of architectural review is to attempt to insure that the architectural scheme of proposed new construction, exterior renovation, or additions in designated areas and proposed new signs in all zoning districts are in harmony with the architectural scheme of the building, site, and surrounding area while striving not to destroy individual creativity for the sake of conformity and avoiding the precise standards that direct attention to superficialities of style rather than general aspects of design.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
[Ord. No. 8173, § 2, 12-3-1992; Ord. No. 8255, § 2, 10-7-1993; Ord. No. 8715, § 1, 4-2-1998; Ord. No. 10192, § 1, 5-15-2014]
(a) 
The Architectural Review Board shall consist of seven members. Each member shall be appointed by the Mayor with approval of the City Council. The first term of one Board member shall be for three years. The first term of two Board members shall be for two years. The first term of the remaining Board members shall be for one year. Thereafter, the terms for all successors shall be for three years. Three alternate members may be appointed to serve in the absence of or the disqualification of the regular members. Each member shall serve until a successor is duly appointed and qualified. In the event of death, resignation or removal of any member, a successor shall be appointed to serve for the unexpired term for which such member has been appointed. The City Council may remove any member of the Architectural Review Board at any time.
(b) 
Preferably, one member of the Architectural Review Board shall be a commercial property owner, business owner, business operator, or employee of a business within the City of Kirkwood and at least two members of the Board shall be professionals in architecture, landscape design, graphic arts, industrial design, urban planning, or similar fields who reside in the City of Kirkwood. Four members shall constitute a quorum for conducting its business.
[Ord. No. 7644, § 1, 4-16-1987]
The Architectural Review Board shall elect from its members a Chairman and Vice Chairman. The Vice Chairman is to act as Chairman in the absence of the Chairman. The Chairman and Vice Chairman shall be elected for a term of one year but shall hold the office until a successor has been elected. The City, by and through the office of the Building Commissioner, shall designate a person to serve as Secretary who shall keep a record of all proceedings. Such records shall be kept on file in the Building Commissioner's office.
[Ord. No. 7644, § 1, 4-16-1987]
The Architectural Review Board shall make rules and regulations as it shall deem necessary for the conduct of its affairs, provided that such rules and regulations shall not be inconsistent with the provisions of this Code and other ordinances of the City. The Architectural Review Board shall hold public meetings as are necessary in order to conduct its business.
[Ord. No. 8173, § 3, 12-3-1992; Ord. No. 8595, § 1, 3-20-1997; Ord. No. 8760, § 1, 9-17-1998; Ord. No. 9611, § 1-2, 8-3-2006]
(a) 
Signs. The Architectural Review Board shall review sign permit applications upon submission of an application and payment of a nonrefundable fee in accordance with Chapter 5, Article VII, Fee Schedule. No sign permit shall be issued for a sign reviewed by the Architectural Review Board until the Architectural Review Board has made an affirmative finding that the proposed sign complies with the criteria for signs set forth in the Code.
(b) 
Nonresidential building permits. The Architectural Review Board shall review all nonresidential building permit applications [single-family residential land uses located within this area shall fall under Subsection (d) below] upon the submission of an application and payment of a nonrefundable fee in accordance with Chapter 5, Article VII, Fee Schedule. The Architectural Review Board shall review the permit application, together with any plans, elevations, detailed drawings, and specifications pertaining to such application. No nonresidential building permit reviewed by the Architectural Review Board, except those within the defined downtown area, pertaining to construction, exterior renovation, or addition shall be issued until the Architectural Review Board has made an affirmative finding that the proposed construction complies with the development criteria set forth in § A-230.3 of the Zoning Code.[1] The Architectural Review Board does not have the authority to deny any nonresidential building application, outside the defined downtown area, and is only serving in an advisory role. In the defined downtown area bounded by Bodley Avenue to the north, Taylor Avenue to the east, Woodbine Avenue to the south, and Clay Avenue to the west, no nonresidential building permit reviewed by the Architectural Review Board pertaining to construction, exterior renovation, or addition shall be issued until the Architectural Review Board has reviewed the proposed nonresidential construction, renovation or addition and made an affirmative finding that the proposed construction complies with the development criteria. The process for appeal from their decision is set forth in § 2-542.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(c) 
Multifamily residential building permits. The Architectural Review Board shall review all multifamily residential building permit applications for new construction, exterior renovations or additions (including mixed use developments) upon the submission of an application and payment of a nonrefundable fee in accordance with Chapter 5, Article VII, Fee Schedule. The Architectural Review Board shall review the permit application, together with any plans, elevations, detailed drawings, and specifications pertaining to such application. No multifamily building permit reviewed by the Architectural Review Board pertaining to construction, exterior renovation, or addition shall be issued until the Architectural Review Board has made an affirmative finding that the proposed construction complies with the development criteria set forth in § A-230.3 of the Zoning Code.[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(d) 
Single-family residential building permits. The Architectural Review Board shall review single-family residential building applications upon the submission of an application and payment of a nonrefundable fee in accordance with Chapter 5, Article VII, Fee Schedule. No single-family residential building permit pertaining to new residential construction, accessory structures or additions to existing residences shall be issued until the Architectural Review Board has reviewed the proposed residential construction, renovation or addition, but the Architectural Review Board does not have the authority to deny any single-family residential building application and is only serving in an advisory role.
As used herein, the following terms shall have the meanings ascribed to them:
ACCESSORY STRUCTURES, MAJOR
Structures greater than 120 square feet or 15 feet in height.
ACCESSORY STRUCTURES, MINOR
Structures that are 120 square feet or less and 15 feet or less in height.
ARCHITECTURAL DETAILING
Unique details and components, such as decorative moldings or architectural ornamentation, which define the nature and quality of the building.
BUILDING ELEMENTS
The building character is composed of many different elements, such as roofs, coping, doors, and windows. Building's architectural style should determine relationships between these various building elements. A change in the wall plane of a facade should be in keeping with the architectural style of the building and should be significant enough to affect the building mass. Repeating elements, such as dormers (bays/display windows/storefronts), can be more effective when they are equally sized and the spaces between them are of an equal proportion. Where effective, there is also often a relationship to other elements on the facade or roof. It is also very effective to maintain a relationship to other elements on the facade or roof.
CHARACTER
Building, site, or element that plays an important role in determining the purpose and/or the function of a streetscape or structure.
COMMISSIONER
The City of Kirkwood Building Commissioner.
CONSISTENT WITH THE ARCHITECTURAL STYLE
Elements identified as being characteristic of a particular architectural style that are described in the "Identifying Features, Principal Subtypes, and Variants and Details" contained in "A Field Guide to American Houses" by Virginia and Lee McAlester.
DEPARTMENT
The City of Kirkwood Building Department.
FACADE
An exterior building wall.
HISTORIC FEATURES
Building elements or features that were part of the structure for over 50 years, or elements that have been indicated as character defining by the Secretary of the Interior, Landmarks Commission of the City, or the Architectural Review Board.[1]
HUMAN SCALE
Building, site, or architectural element that is scaled in relation to pedestrians.
INFILL LOT
A lot located adjacent to or between two improved lots.
MATERIALS, HIGH-QUALITY
The building materials that have a manufacturer's warranty for the material and color fastness greater than 20 years.[2]
MATERIALS, REGIONAL
Material that is produced, harvested or has final assembly less than 500 miles from Kirkwood, Missouri, City center.
NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEXT
The three houses on either side of the subject property and seven houses across the street on the same block.
PARAPET
A wall extending above a roof around the exterior.
PRIMARY FACADE
The side of the building that faces the public right-of-way, and/or is the primary entrance to the structure. Depending on how a building is placed on the site can have a great deal of influence on what will ultimately become its primary facade. Traditionally, the primary facade is the facade which faces the street on which it is located and which displays its street address; however, multi-tenant or mixed-use developments may result in the primary facade facing an interior court, parking lot, or pedestrian way which is separate from its street frontage/street address. With these types of developments particular attention will be paid to how equal weight is placed on both the primary and street frontage so as not to interrupt the original streetscape.[3]
REMOTE WALLS
A wall not visible from any public right-of-way.
ROOF, GABLE
A roof created from straight slopes falling from the ridge to eave, creating a triangle part of a building on the side or front facade.
ROOF, HIP
A roof formed by four triangular shaped sides which meet at a pointed peak.
ROOF, MANSARD
A hipped roof containing a flat top and two roof pitches. A low-sloped roof pitches from the flat top then breaks to a steep pitch (almost vertical) above the exterior wall.
ROOF, PRIMARY
The roof over largest volume of the house.
ROOF, SECONDARY
The roof(s) over areas other than the largest volume of the house.
ROOF, SHED
A roof formed by a single, sloping plane from one end of building mass to the other.
STREETSCAPE
The continuation of the building massing of the primary facades at the front of the site helps to create the street wall. Effective streetscapes have a consistent front setback, are pedestrian friendly, and are not largely concealed or interrupted by parking.
TRADITIONAL MASONRY UNIT SIZES
In order to be in keeping with the context of other brick masonry buildings within Kirkwood a traditional unit size should be used. A traditional masonry unit size (standard/modular/norman) will result in three courses being equal to approximately eight inches in height for the vertical coursing.
[1]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. II).
[2]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. II).
[3]
Editor's Note: Amended at time of adoption of Code (see Ch. 1, General Provisions, Art. II).
(a) 
Process. Except as otherwise provided herein, the Architectural Review Board shall review and act upon sign permit applications referred to it within 30 days of the date on which such application is filed with the Building Commissioner's office unless the applicant and Architectural Review Board jointly agree to extend the time for review.
(b) 
Failure to act in prescribed time. If the Architectural Review Board fails to take action within the time prescribed herein, it shall be considered to have recommended approval of the application.
(c) 
Appeals. In the event that the Architectural Review Board makes a negative finding with respect to a sign permit application under its consideration, the applicant may file a petition in the Circuit Court of St. Louis County within 30 days of the finding of the Architectural Review Board setting forth the reasons why the decision of the Architectural Review Board is illegal or improper.
[Ord. No. 7644, § 1, 4-16-1987; Ord. No. 8173, § 4, 12-3-1992; Ord. No. 9753; § 1, 3-6-2008]
(a) 
Process. Except as otherwise provided herein, the Architectural Review Board shall review and act upon multifamily building permit applications referred to it within 120 days of the date on which such application is filed with the Building Commissioner's office unless the applicant and Architectural Review Board jointly agree to extend the time for review.
In reviewing applications that are part of a comprehensive project involving review by the Planning and Zoning Commission, the Architectural Review Board shall make a good faith effort to review and act upon such application so that the action of the Architectural Review Board will coordinate with the review and action of the Planning and Zoning Commission, provided that the review process does not exceed the time period described above.
Applications that are subject to review by the Architectural Review Board and the Landmarks Commission shall be reviewed concurrently by each body in order that the review period shall not exceed 120 days.
(b) 
Design. The Architectural Review Board will review applications to ensure compliance with § A-230.3 of the Zoning Code.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(c) 
Failure to act in prescribed time. If the Architectural Review Board fails to take action within the time prescribed herein, it shall be considered to have recommended approval of the application.
(d) 
Appeals. In the event that the Architectural Review Board shall make a negative finding with respect to a building permit application under its consideration, the applicant may appeal such negative finding to the City Council. In the event the subject matter of such application is to be considered by the City Council because of other provisions of this Code, then such review by the City Council shall include a review of this finding and the City Council may reverse, modify or affirm the Architectural Review Board with respect to this finding by a majority vote.
In the event the subject of the building permit application would not otherwise come before the City Council, then upon application to the City Clerk within 15 days of the entry of the decision of the Architectural Review Board at the Board meeting, upon a form made available for this purpose, the applicant may appeal the negative finding of the Architectural Review Board with respect to this section. The City Council shall then hold a hearing and may reverse, modify or affirm the Architectural Review Board's decision by a majority vote.
(a) 
Process. The Architectural Review Board shall provide an advisory review of all building permit applications for new single-family residences and their accessory structures and all additions to existing homes for the purpose of advising the applicant on design modifications as follows:
(1) 
A meeting between the applicant and the Architectural Review Board will facilitate design review of the proposed improvements and promote quality residential design, and applicants are encouraged to file an application with the Architectural Review Board for an early design phase meeting so that the Architectural Review Board can review and comment on the design and suggest design changes before design and construction documents are finalized. An early design phase meeting is encouraged but not required;
(2) 
Prior to the issuance of a building permit, the Architectural Review Board shall review and comment on the design based upon the guidelines set forth herein within 180 days of the date on which such building permit application is filed with the Building Commissioner's office unless the applicant and the Architectural Review Board jointly agree to extend the time for review. Any agreed upon design changes or conditions will be written into the building permit requirements. If the Architectural Review Board and the applicant fail to reach an agreement on design modifications to a new single-family residence, their accessory structures, or addition, the Building Department shall process the permit as submitted by the applicant;
(3) 
If the building is in a local or national historic district or if the building is a local or national historic structure, a joint meeting of the Architectural Review Board and the Landmarks Commission will take place to review and comment on the design based upon the guidelines set forth herein. If there is any contradiction between the historic district design guidelines and the preferred items listed herein, the historic district design guidelines shall govern.
(b) 
Purpose. New residential development will impact how existing residents, visitors, and potential residents and businesses perceive and experience Kirkwood's community character. Keeping the size, location, and design of new development consistent with the community's existing image and preferred character is important. New residential development also impacts the quality of life of our residents, particularly those that live in direct proximity to the development. Ensuring that the size, location, and design of new development fits with the desired neighborhood character, scale, activity, and lifestyle is imperative as to how our residential neighborhoods look, feel, and function and directly affects the day-to-day quality of life of our residents. Accordingly, all residential development shall meet the minimum standards set forth in the Zoning Code[1] in addition to the guidelines and objectives set forth herein.
(1) 
To achieve the preferred character of residential infill development, designers and builders need to incorporate the following goals and objectives set forth herein into their residential developments, additions, and renovation projects:
a. 
Protect and enhance the community's overall image and character by:
(i) 
Creating elegant and lush streetscapes.
(ii) 
Forming a cohesive neighborhood scale.
(iii) 
Utilizing high quality architectural character.
b. 
Respect the neighbors' quality of life by:
(i) 
"Fitting" with the design character of the existing neighborhood.
(ii) 
Building to a neighborly sense of scale.
(iii) 
Protecting and forming a cohesive landscape.
(2) 
Design principles. Because it is possible to follow all of the individual guidelines contained herein and still assemble the design in a way that does not achieve the goals and objectives, designers and builders need to incorporate a design that is compatible within the neighborhood context.
(3) 
Classification. Kirkwood has had a rich and diverse history of residential development for more than 150 years. As the community moves forward into the 21st century, continuing that diversity will be essential to maintaining the character and quality of life and meeting the goals and objectives described herein. Accordingly, a system for guiding the design of homes has been developed that allows for flexibility while also protecting the essence of what makes Kirkwood's neighborhoods special. At the core of this system is the use of the following project element classifications:
a. 
Preferred elements are those the City finds to be highly compatible with and contributing to the existing character and quality of life in the single-family zoning districts and for achieving the preferred character of residential infill development. Appropriately incorporating these elements into a project significantly increases the likelihood that the project will be viewed favorably by the Architectural Review Board.
b. 
Discouraged elements are those the City finds to be potentially incompatible with and detracting from the existing character and quality of life of the single-family zoning districts and the preferred character of residential infill development. Incorporating discouraged elements into a project decreases the likelihood that the project will be viewed favorably. Because discouraged elements have the potential to be disruptive to the existing character of a neighborhood, applicants shall demonstrate how their use in the context of their total project design is consistent with:
(i) 
The existing character of Kirkwood's neighborhoods;
(ii) 
The preferred character of infill residential development;
(iii) 
The goals and objectives set forth herein;
(iv) 
The overview and purpose for the particular element;
(v) 
The general architectural style/design of the structure; and
(vi) 
The use of all other elements on the structure or site.
c. 
Exceptions. The specific character of individual neighborhoods varies widely throughout the City. Design guidelines for various project elements are presented generally, but certain exceptions may be allowed based on the character and design of existing homes within the neighborhood context.
d. 
Similar elements. Because the number and types of building products are virtually infinite and ever changing, the project elements described herein are those most commonly used. Thus, the elements classified as being preferred or discouraged are not intended to be an all-inclusive list. In those instances where a proposed element is not listed, the Architectural Review Board shall determine whether the particular element is substantially similar to any of those that are listed and classify it accordingly. In making such a determination, the Architectural Review Board shall consider similarities in terms of:
(i) 
Finished appearance;
(ii) 
Quality of construction;
(iii) 
Durability;
(iv) 
Consistency with the overview and purpose statement associated with the element; and
(v) 
Consistency with the preferred character of infill residential development.
(4) 
Conformance to Code. When constructing a dwelling, the design must comply with all of the requirements of the Zoning Code,[2] including height, setback and size, and the design must consider the neighborhood context.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(5) 
Historic districts and landmark structures. The design guidelines contained herein are intended to be applied to all single-family homes in all single-family zoning districts. However, for properties and structures within designated historic districts, additional guidelines may apply. Further, additional guidelines also may apply to those properties and structures which have been designated as landmarks. In the event the historic district or landmark design guidelines contained in Division 8 of this article conflict with those of these guidelines, the guidelines in Division 8 shall prevail.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(c) 
Design guidelines. All design elements not identified as "preferred" should be discussed with the Architectural Review Board at the early design phase meeting.
(1) 
Building form and articulation. Houses are shaped and articulated by roof form, the number and placement of rooflines, the shape and proportion of building masses/features, the configuration of exterior walls, and the character of these elements. These design elements influence the perception of a home's scale, its stylistic character, and the fit with its neighbors and should be consistent with the neighborhood's desired character. To be consistent with the preferred character of residential infill development, houses should present a simple overall building form (see Fig. 1) and roof geometry in character with its neighbors (houses of a mature suburb rather than a new one). Exterior walls should be articulated, not monotonous, or consist of overly complex facade treatments. Further, the building form and articulation should be based on an authentic architectural style.
Figure 1: Simple Building Form
002 Fig 1 Simple Building Form.tif
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Gabled and hipped roofs when a predominant roof style is either gabled or hipped (see Fig. 2).
(ii) 
Symmetrical pitches.
(iii) 
Rectangular configured floor plans.
(iv) 
Vertical building volumes (if incorporated) appear secondary to the primary building volume and of less than one-third of the area of the front facade.
(v) 
Dormers (if incorporated) integrated with building rhythm.
(vi) 
Long, uninterrupted facades should be articulated by the use of architectural elements, such as recesses, bays, projections, or changes of wall plane (see Fig. 3).
(vii) 
Sustainable roofing materials, such as clay tile, slate, wood shake and recycled synthetic tiles.
Figure 2: Roof Styles
002 Fig 2 Roof Styles.tif
Figure 3: Facade Treatment
002 Fig 3 Facade Treatment.tif
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Primary roof pitch less than 4:12 or more than 12:12 and outside of 4:12 of the contextual average roof pitch (see Fig. 4).
(ii) 
More than three rooflines or eave lines on the front facade (see Fig. 5).
(iii) 
More than three wall planes creating multi-layer setbacks on the front facade (see Fig. 6).
(iv) 
Angular (angles other than 90°) or curved walls, in plan or elevation, as a dominant or repetitive feature (see Fig. 7).
(v) 
Shed and flat roof styles are allowed as primary roofs when they are a predominant roof style of the site context.
(vi) 
For houses with pitched roofs over the main portion of the structure, flat roofs are allowed over minor building volumes and features (see Fig. 8).
(vii) 
For houses with pitched roofs over the main portion of the structure, flat roofs are allowed as a part of a truncated hip roof configuration if not visible from street and less than 20% of total roof area (orthographic measurement) (see Fig. 8).
Figure 4: Roof Pitch
002 Fig 4 Roof Pitch.tif
Figure 5: Roof and Eave Lines
002 Fig 5 Roof and Eave Lines.tif
Figure 6: Complex Facade Treatment
002 Fig 6 Complex Facade Treatmenttif.tif
Figure 7: Floor Plan Configurations
002 Fig 7 Floor Plan Configurations.tif
Figure 8: Flat Roof Exceptions
002 Fig 8 Flat Roof Exceptions.tif
(2) 
Building materials and material quality. Materials, material quality, and finishes include all exposed exterior surfaces of foundations, siding, trim, soffits, other detailing, and roofing. To be consistent with the preferred character of residential development, houses should have a limited, simple palette of materials, which should also be durable and maintain their form and color over time.
Predominant material palette. Determine the contextual predominant material palette by identifying the primary materials used on the exterior of the front facades of existing houses within the neighborhood context. Any material present on 20% or more of the existing houses within your neighborhood context is considered a predominant material, so there may be more than one. If a single material (e.g., brick, clapboard, etc.) is dominant (present on more than 70% of houses within the site context), that material is considered to be the single dominant material.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Brick, stone or clapboard (wood or fiber cement) where there is not a single dominant material or a predominant material palette within the neighborhood context.
(ii) 
When used, clapboard siding made of wood or fiber cement needs to mimic the profile of traditional wood siding.
(iii) 
When used, real brick and stone, not other materials simulating brick or stone. Synthetic stone may be used when approved by the Architectural Review Board.
(iv) 
When used, high quality vinyl siding.
(v) 
Detailing with stone or siding of exposed foundation wall.
(vi) 
Consistent use of exterior finish material on all facades and features of the house.
(vii) 
If change of material is needed, change at shift of wall plane.
(viii) 
Products that yield durability and represent a long life cycle.
(ix) 
Copper or lead flashing. If other materials are used, flashing to match color of adjacent building material.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Engineered wood siding (OSB, hardboard, and plywood).
(ii) 
More than two primary exterior wall materials.
(iii) 
More than two visible roofing materials, colors, or styles.
(iv) 
Unfinished concrete block and poured-in-place walls exposed more than one foot high on a front facade or two feet high on a side or rear facade.
(v) 
Roof and wall materials that are not consistent with the architectural style.
(vi) 
Roof and wall materials uncharacteristic of single-family construction.
(3) 
Exterior windows and doors. This section provides guidelines for all exterior windows and doors, their wall openings, and their frames and trim. The location, size, configuration, and character of exterior windows and doors influence the perceived scale, facade patterns, and architectural character of new houses and additions. To be consistent with the preferred character of residential development, windows and doors should be in keeping with the size, proportions, and style of the house and used to achieve a desirable facade composition.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Recessed openings.
(ii) 
Window and door style consistent with architectural style.
(iii) 
Same window type, style, material, and color on all facades.
(iv) 
Storm windows and screens that match window profile.
(v) 
Primary entry located on a street-facing facade or partial street-facing facade within 20 feet of the primary street-facing facade.
(vi) 
Operable windows.
(vii) 
Trim/detailing around windows.
(viii) 
Shutters in proportion to the window.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
More than one window or door header height that does not match dominant header height on individual floors.
(ii) 
More than three window types or three window sizes on front and side facades (see Fig. 9).
(iii) 
More than two door types on front and side facades.
(iv) 
Sliding glass doors on front facade.
(v) 
Metal awnings.
(vi) 
Double-wide (or larger) front facing garage doors on attached garages.
(vii) 
Front facing garage doors taller than eight feet on attached garages.
(viii) 
Moderate to highly reflective glass.
c. 
Exceptions.
(i) 
Transom windows which do not match dominant header height.
(ii) 
Lots with a building envelope of less than 50 feet may provide double-wide front facing attached garages.
Figure 9: Window and Door Placement and Configuration
002 Fig 9 Window and Door Place and Config.tif
(4) 
Detailing. To be consistent with the preferred character of infill residential development, detailing should be constructed of high quality materials, sized and configured in proportion with the scale of the architectural features, and match the architectural style of the house as a whole.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Gutters and downspouts well integrated with eaves and soffits.
(ii) 
Hidden or architecturally integrated utility equipment.
(iii) 
Products that yield durability and represent a long life cycle.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Utility equipment located on the front facade, in the front yard, or visible from a street unless hidden with landscape features.
(5) 
Additions. Such projects still have the potential to impact the sense of building scale of the neighborhood. To be consistent with the preferred character of residential development, additions should be carefully planned and respect the architectural integrity of the original structure (see Fig. 10).
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
All preferred guidelines for building form and articulation, materials and detailing, and windows and doors.
(ii) 
Removal of existing discouraged design elements.
(iii) 
Use of field and trim colors that are the same as or highly compatible with the house.
(iv) 
Use of similar wall, feature, door and window proportions.
(v) 
Alignment of eave lines, door and window headers, horizontal trim.
(vi) 
Same or similar architectural style of house.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
All discouraged guidelines for building form and articulation, materials and detailing, and windows and doors.
Figure 10: Additions
002 Fig 10 Additions.tif
(6) 
Major accessory structures. Major accessory structures are those larger than 120 square feet or taller than 15 feet. These accessory structures impact the character of residential sites, their neighbor's experience of their own site, and the character of the neighborhood. To be consistent with the preferred character of residential infill development, major accessory structures should be located on the site, sized, configured, and treated to complement the main house, respect neighbors, and integrate with site's layout, scale, and character.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
All preferred guidelines for building form and articulation, materials and detailing, and windows and doors.
(ii) 
Materials and colors to match the main house.
(iii) 
Garage doors with windows and articulated panels.
(iv) 
Roof style to match primary roof of house.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
All discouraged guidelines for building form and articulation, materials and detailing, and windows and doors.
c. 
Exceptions.
(i) 
Flat roofs are allowed as a part of a truncated hip roof configuration if not visible from the street and less than 20% of total roof area (orthographic measurement).
[Ord. No. 7644, § 1, 4-16-1987]
The City, through the office of the Chief Administrative Officer, shall assign to the Architectural Review Board such office space and facilities and such necessary clerical help as shall be necessary for the fulfillment of its duties. The City Attorney shall render such legal services as shall be necessary or required.
[Ord. No. 7644, § 1, 4-16-1987]
The Architectural Review Board shall provide minutes or reports of its meeting to the Mayor and City Council.
(a) 
Process. Except as otherwise provided herein, the Architectural Review Board shall review and act upon building permit applications referred to it within 180 days of the date on which such application is filed with the Building Commissioner's office unless the applicant and Architectural Review Board jointly agree to extend the time for review.
(1) 
Applications that are subject to review by the Architectural Review Board and the Landmarks Commission shall be reviewed concurrently by each body in order that the review period shall not exceed the time period described above.
(2) 
If the building is in a local or national historic district or if the building is a local or national historic structure, a joint meeting of the Architectural Review Board and the Landmarks Commission will take place to review and comment on the design based upon the guidelines set forth herein. If there is any contradiction between the historic district design guidelines and the preferred items listed herein, the historic district design guidelines shall govern. Applications that are subject to review by the Architectural Review Board and the Landmarks Commission shall be review concurrently by each body in order that the review period shall not exceed 180 days.
(3) 
Items needed for the ARB Submittal.
a. 
If the new buildings change the massing of the streetscape, as determined by the ARB, or if the primary elevation is not in line with the other buildings, a 3-D digital model should be submitted to assist the Board in understanding the proposed massing of the project. The model needs to illustrate how the buildings' change in massing will affect the streetscape.
b. 
A rendering of the project in the street context to assist the Board in understanding how the building relates to its neighboring buildings.
c. 
Material and color board. A presentation board illustrating the coordinated palette of colors and materials for each building. This palette should be compatible with adjacent structures.
d. 
Sign plan or criteria for the building or center.
e. 
Material warranties for all exterior synthetic materials.
f. 
Color photos of surrounding buildings.
(4) 
Appeals. In the event that the Architectural Review Board shall make a negative finding with respect to a building permit application under its consideration, the applicant may appeal such negative finding to the City Council. In the event the subject matter of such application is to be considered by the City Council because of other provisions of this Code, then such review by the City Council shall include a review of this finding, and the City Council may reverse, modify or affirm the Architectural Review Board with respect to this finding by a majority vote.
In the event the subject of the building permit application would not otherwise come before the City Council, then upon application to the City Clerk within 15 days of the entry of the decision of the Architectural Review Board at the Board meeting, upon a form made available for this purpose, the applicant may appeal the negative finding of the Architectural Review Board with respect to this section. The City Council shall then hold a hearing and may reverse, modify or affirm the Architectural Review Board's decision by a majority vote.
(b) 
Purpose. New development will impact how existing residents, visitors, and potential residents and businesses perceive and experience Kirkwood's community character. Keeping the size, location, and design of new development consistent with the community's existing image and preferred character is important. New commercial development also impacts the quality of life of our residents, particularly those that live in direct proximity to the development. Ensuring that the size, location, and design of new development fits with the desired neighborhood character, scale, activity, and lifestyle is imperative as to how our neighborhoods look, feel, and function and directly affects the day-to-day quality of life of our residents. Accordingly, all commercial development shall meet the minimum standards set forth in the Zoning Code[1] in addition to the guidelines and objectives set forth herein.
(1) 
To achieve the preferred character of commercial development, designers and builders need to incorporate the following goals and objectives set forth herein into their commercial developments, additions, and renovation projects:
a. 
Protect and enhance the community's overall image and character by:
(i) 
Creating elegant streetscapes.
(ii) 
Forming a cohesive neighborhood scale.
(iii) 
Utilizing high quality architectural character.
b. 
Respect the neighbors' quality of life by:
(i) 
"Fitting" with the design character of the existing neighborhood.
(ii) 
Building to a neighborly sense of scale.
(iii) 
Protecting and forming a cohesive landscape.
(2) 
Design principles. Because it is possible to follow all of the individual guidelines contained herein and still assemble the design in a way that does not achieve the goals and objectives, designers and builders need to incorporate a design that is compatible within the neighborhood context.
(3) 
Classification. Kirkwood has had a rich and diverse history of commercial development for more than 150 years. As the community moves forward into the 21st century, continuing that diversity will be essential to maintaining the character and quality of life and meeting the goals and objectives described herein. Accordingly, a system for guiding the design of commercial development has been developed that allows for flexibility while also protecting the essence of what makes Kirkwood's neighborhoods special. At the core of this system is the use of the following project element classifications:
a. 
Preferred elements are those the City finds to be highly compatible with and contributing to the existing character in the business and industrial zoning districts. Appropriately incorporating these elements into a project significantly increases the likelihood that the project will be viewed favorably by the Architectural Review Board.
b. 
Discouraged elements are those the City finds to be potentially incompatible with and detracting from the existing character of the business and industrial zoning districts. Incorporating discouraged elements into a project decreases the likelihood that the project will be viewed favorably. Because discouraged elements have the potential to be disruptive to the existing character of a neighborhood, applicants shall be required to demonstrate how their use in the context of their total project design is consistent with:
(i) 
The existing character of Kirkwood neighborhoods and business districts;
(ii) 
The preferred character of infill commercial development;
(iii) 
The goals and objectives set forth herein;
(iv) 
The overview and purpose for the particular element;
(v) 
The general architectural style/design of the structure; and
(vi) 
The use of all other elements on the structure or site.
c. 
Exceptions. The specific character of individual neighborhoods, business districts, and commercial developments varies widely throughout the City. Design guidelines for various project elements are presented generally, but certain exceptions may be allowed based on the character and design of existing businesses and their respective districts or commercial developments within the neighborhood context.
d. 
Similar elements. Because the number and types of building products are virtually infinite and ever changing, the project elements described herein are those most commonly used. Thus, the elements classified as being preferred or discouraged are not intended to be an all-inclusive list. In those instances where a proposed element is not listed, the Architectural Review Board shall determine whether the particular element is substantially similar to any of those that are listed and classify it accordingly. In making such a determination, the Architectural Review Board shall consider similarities in terms of:
(i) 
Finished appearance;
(ii) 
Quality of construction;
(iii) 
Durability, warranty;
(iv) 
Consistency with the overview and purpose statement associated with the element; and
(v) 
Consistency with the preferred character of business districts and commercial developments.
(4) 
Conformance to Code. When constructing a building, the design must comply with all of the requirements of the Zoning Code[2] and the design must consider the neighborhood context.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(5) 
Historic districts and landmark structures. The design guidelines contained herein are intended to be applied to structures within the business and industrial zoning districts. However, for properties and structures within designated historic districts, additional guidelines may apply. Further, additional guidelines also may apply to those properties and structures which have been designated as landmarks. In the event the historic district or landmark design guidelines contained in Division 8 of this article conflict with those of these guidelines, the guidelines in Division 8 shall prevail.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Appendix A, Zoning.
(c) 
Design guidelines. All design elements not identified as "preferred" should be discussed with the Architectural Review Board at the early design phase meeting.
(1) 
Site context. The design of commercial structures should relate to character-defining elements in the neighborhood. Downtown Kirkwood has a different motif than commercial design at the intersection of Big Bend Road and Kirkwood Road as well as along Manchester. The neighborhoods can be broken down into four main context groups. Throughout the Commercial Design Guild these groupings will be referred to as follows:
HD
National Historic Downtown District (see Figure 1: District Map, below)
NB
Neighborhood Business (Zoning Districts B-1, B-2, and B-4)
HB
Highway Business (B-3 and B-5)
I
Industrial (I-1)
002 Historic Train Station.tif
Historic Train Station
a. 
(HD) National Historic Downtown District:
The Downtown Kirkwood Historic District (HD) includes portions of eight blocks with 72 buildings, nine sites and one sign. The HD in the heart of Kirkwood is surrounded by residential buildings adjacent to the district and newer commercial development along Kirkwood Road to the north and south. Arranged in a standard grid pattern, the district is an irregular T-shape with Kirkwood Road forming the leg of the T and Argonne Drive and Jefferson Avenue forming the arms of the T. Most of the HD is bounded on the south by the Union Pacific Railroad tracks, but the district extends further south along the west side of Kirkwood Road, including City Hall and a block of commercial buildings, ending just south of Monroe Avenue. The eastern boundary is one block east of Kirkwood Road at Taylor Avenue. Most of the northern boundary includes the north side of Jefferson Avenue but several of the properties east of 105-109 East Jefferson are parking lots so from that point east the north side is excluded. The western boundary is one block west of Kirkwood Road at Clay Avenue and runs south to the railroad tracks, then the western boundary moves east to the rear of City Hall and the back lots of the commercial buildings facing Kirkwood Road.
The streets of the commercial area are lined with a mixture of one-story and two-story commercial buildings. A few buildings date from the late 1800s; however, most of the construction dates are after 1900 and span into the early 1960s. In the 1920s and '30s many of the older buildings were faced with brick or stucco, apparently in an attempt to update the community's image. Nearly a third of the HD represents post World War II construction or new facades, an indication of the continued growth and prosperity of the community in the mid-20th century. The design motifs of the Downtown Kirkwood National District should be referenced as buildings are designed through the entire City.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Buildings within the National Historic Downtown District shall follow the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation by the National Park Service when rehabilitating or modifying the materials and features of a property.
[2] 
Retention and preservation of the historic character of a property.
[3] 
Preservation of distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize the building period of origin.
[4] 
Repair and restoration of deteriorated historic features.
[5] 
New features to match the old if replacement is needed of a distinctive feature, such as, design, texture, and other visual qualities and, where possible, materials.
[6] 
Maintenance of the first floor as a retail store front.
[7] 
Screening for all loading docks and trash storage with contextual materials.
[8] 
Service elements, such as loading doors, should be integrated with the building elevation designed so to minimize the visual impact of such elements.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property.
[2] 
Use of cleaning or patching treatments that cause damage to historic materials.
[3] 
Drive-through windows.
Figure 1: District Map
Downtown Kirkwood Historic District
St. Louis County, Missouri
002 Downtown Kirkwood Historic District.tif
b. 
Neighborhood Business (NB, Zoning Districts B-1, B-2, B-4). The streets of downtown Kirkwood are lined with trees and are laid out in a grid pattern that continues out of the district into the residential areas surrounding it. The buildings have a relatively uniform setback, extending to the public sidewalk. Most of the buildings on Kirkwood Road directly abut the neighboring buildings. Some of the buildings facing the east-west streets (addressed on Argonne or Jefferson) are on individual lots with at least some space between the buildings and an occasional parking lot often developed historically before 1945. Most are simply one- or two-part, brick commercial storefront buildings with one-story buildings interspersed with two-story buildings to create an undulating skyline. The uniform setbacks, relatively consistent size of the buildings, and the use of similar materials give the district a degree of continuity that allows 1870s and 1960s buildings to complement one another and create a visual cohesiveness to the district that further differentiates the business district from the surrounding residential neighborhoods and flanking newer commercial developments. The design motifs of the Downtown Kirkwood National District should be referenced as buildings are designed through the entire City.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Building massing and program space that complement the sidewalks and plantings to create a linkage to surrounding neighborhoods.
[2] 
Maintenance of the first floor as a retail store front.
[3] 
Site architectural features may include brick, stone pavers, colored concrete, and decomposed granite along pedestrian circulation routes.
[4] 
Screening for all loading docks, parking lots and trash storage with contextual materials.
[5] 
Service elements, such as loading doors, should be integrated with the building elevation designed so to minimize the visual impact of such elements.
[6] 
Utilities to be installed underground.
[7] 
All mechanical equipment, utility meters, storage tanks, air-conditioning equipment, and similar equipment to be screened from view by an architectural element integrated into the structure.
[8] 
Modified national or regional prototypes so that it complements the context of the site.
[9] 
Designs of new buildings may be contemporary; however they need to reference design motifs found in the historic district.
[10] 
Walk-up windows.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Loading docks and trash storage along street frontages.
[2] 
Commercial building designs that are obviously national or regional prototypes.
[3] 
Drive-through windows on the primary facade.
c. 
Highway Business (HB, Zoning Districts B-3, B-5). Lindbergh Boulevard and Manchester Boulevard are United States Highways. These streets are lined with large commercial development and strip malls. However, the design motifs of the Downtown Kirkwood National District should be referenced as buildings are designed through the entire City.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Cart corrals designed to work with the building context.
[2] 
Materials for pedestrian circulation routes are brick, stone pavers, colored concrete, and decomposed granite.
[3] 
Screening for all loading docks and trash storage.
[4] 
Service elements, such as loading doors, should be integrated with the building elevation designed so to minimize the visual impact of such elements.
[5] 
All mechanical equipment, utility meters, storage tanks, air-conditioning equipment, and similar equipment should be screened from view by an architectural element integrated into the structure.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Cart corrals just made of metal tubing.
[2] 
Loading docks and trash storage along street frontages.
d. 
Industrial. Building in the industrial zone should follow the recommendations of the area that abuts it. For example, if an industrial zone is next to an NB area, then that building or development needs to follow the requirements of the adjacent NB area; if it is next to a residential area, then it will need to follow the requirements of an NB area and take particular care to the size, massing, setback, and overall siting as it relates to the overall neighborhood and streetscape.
002 Kirkwood Downtown Motif.tif
Kirkwood Downtown Motif
(2) 
Building massing and articulation (mass, alignment, pattern, proportions). Building massing is looking at its three-dimensional form and evaluating it for relative scale, bulkiness and relationship to exterior spaces, and to the overall streetscape. Massing that is "broken up" to reduce bulkiness is usually more successful. The massing of buildings with larger footprints can appear oppressive or overly bulky if care is not taken to articulate the mass.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Design building masses which help to continue or establish a streetscape.
(ii) 
Well-scaled elements or structures that are sensitive to the site context.
(iii) 
Break large projects into a series of appropriately scaled masses so that no building is more than 30 feet in length without a break in the massing.
(iv) 
Buildings in the NB context group should maintain a consistent street wall along their street frontages. Variety in massing is encouraged between neighboring buildings although significant differences in massing will receive much greater scrutiny.
(v) 
Human scale, unique detailing of the building system of architectural elements — entrances, windows, roof and base of building.
(vi) 
Building elements inherent of an architectural style. For example, peculiar volumes, such as cylinders and conical roofs, should not be employed for architectural styles that do not have a history of incorporating such volumes.
(vii) 
Building massing that responds to the topographical conditions and landscape features that are specific to the site.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Monolithic slab-like structures that wall off views and overshadow the surrounding neighborhood.
(ii) 
Significant height changes between buildings.
(iii) 
Retaining walls greater than five feet in height.
(3) 
Materials, texture, and color. The choice of materials and texture has great visual significance. Coordinating materials within a development can tie buildings of different sizes, uses, and forms together, while contrasting materials, textures, or colors within a large building may add visual interest and reduce its scale. In an effort to perpetuate Kirkwood's unique character and to reinforce its local identity, it is important that new development be compatible with and respectful of the strengths of the City's current and historical development fabric. New structures within the various commercial districts of Kirkwood shall be compatible with their neighbors in regard to exterior building materials, particularly when adjacent structures are substantially in compliance with the guidelines. This does not imply uniformity of architectural style; rather, a similarity to exterior building materials of nearby "conforming" structures and environment.
a. 
Materials. High quality building construction begins with durable and aesthetic materials.
(i) 
Building materials, textures and colors shall be used in a consistent manner on the exterior of the building.
(ii) 
Materials, textures, and colors on all exposed facades shall be given equal values; this includes the many other architectural features which make up the design. The materials on the sides of the building as well as those used on these other architectural features should form a cohesive design and should not be sacrificed, overlooked, or neglected.
(iii) 
Industrial areas are to be held to a similar standard as commercial, especially on arterial and collector streets, except for "remote walls."
b. 
Color. Color is an integral element of the overall design. Brick, stone, and concrete have an inherent color created by nature or during the manufacturing process. Other surfaces will get their color from applied materials such as paint.
(i) 
The color palette of the building and any material patterns (such as a brick or stone color mix or pattern) should be limited and display a subtle color range with the color saturation, brightness, and texture not to vary more than 20%.
(ii) 
The colors of exposed exterior components of a building are to be of low reflectance, subtle, neutral, or simple earth-tone colors. The use of accent colors should be limited to architectural detail elements or trim (metal or wood detailing), but again these should also be of low reflectance, subtle, earth-tone colors. High-intensity colors, primary colors, or metallic colors are not recommended for any part of the development.
c. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Brick, natural clay-fired, traditional masonry unit sizes.
(ii) 
Stone, natural, traditional masonry unit sizes.
(iii) 
Finished concrete, natural/exposed aggregate, for steps, ramps, walkways, retaining walls, porches, docks, and foundations. When used on the facade they should not be used on more than 10% of the overall facade.
(iv) 
Architectural detailing.
[1] 
Metal (cast iron, tin, copper, and wrought iron), steel windows, aluminum clad wood windows, gutters/downspouts/leaf guards.
[2] 
Wood; consider alternatives such as simulated wood details made of plastic, fiberglass, or fibrous cement.
[3] 
Rough sawn or treated lumber.
(v) 
Stone or split face concrete block retaining walls.
(vi) 
Regional materials.
(vii) 
Awnings should be made of a material that is mold- and fire-resistant.
d. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Corrugated metal for use as retaining walls.
(ii) 
Retaining walls larger than five feet zero inches in height.
(iii) 
Vinyl, aluminum, or other synthetic siding on any primary facade.
(iv) 
Smooth concrete block (split face or ground face only); not intended to be used as a substitute for stone or brick.
(v) 
Industrial grade precast concrete or tilt-up.
(vi) 
Vinyl or other synthetic composite windows.
(vii) 
Highly reflective aluminum windows and doors; this includes storm windows and/or storm door units.
(viii) 
Premanufactured assemblies, such as metal buildings, aluminum sun rooms, tented structures (frame or tension).
(ix) 
Composite panel systems, metal or cement.
(x) 
Plywood.
(xi) 
Fiberglass.
(xii) 
Exterior insulation and finish systems.
(xiii) 
Visible white roofing materials. A more neutral color is required at roofs which are visible.
(4) 
Building features.
a. 
Window and doors.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Window placement on upper floor that aligns with storefront below.
[2] 
Windows and doors should be similar in size, shape, style, placement, configuration, and materials and color on all facades, and should be complimentary of the existing character of the downtown historic district.
[3] 
Glass must be clear or nearly clear.
[4] 
Glazed area should extend not to exceed 40% on any facade (storefront type first-floor windows should be excluded from the 40%).
[5] 
Consistent rhythm of the window spacing and size.
[6] 
Recessed openings.
[7] 
Window and door style consistent with architectural style.
[8] 
Storm windows and screens that match window profile.
[9] 
Primary entry located on the addressed street-facing facade or partial street-facing facade within 20 feet of the primary street-facing facade.
[10] 
Trim/detailing around windows.
[11] 
Shutters in proportion to the window.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Highly reflective or tinted windows.
[2] 
Multiple sized widows on a facade.
[3] 
Residential windows on the first floor.
[4] 
Awning material infill for a door or storefront material.
[5] 
Vinyl or plastic windows.
b. 
Projections/awnings/canopies.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Projections that are in character with the style and period of the building type.
[2] 
Placement on upper floor that aligns with storefront below.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Projections and bays greater than two feet from the face of the building.
[2] 
No backlit projections or awnings.
[3] 
Awnings should not be used as primary design elements.
c. 
Roof.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Flat roofs.
[2] 
In an attempt to avoid monolithic roof lines it is preferred that buildings break up the roof mass through the use of design elements, such as stepped parapets, motif parapets, decorative cornices, etc.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Fiberglass roofs.
[2] 
Visible white roofing materials. A more neutral color is required at roofs which are visible.
[3] 
Visible rolled asphalt or membrane roofs.
[4] 
The use of two-dimensional roofline elements, also known as "stage front," which are not integrated into the building design. Please note that while these are discouraged elements, the Board does recognize motif parapets when used more sparingly and in a more traditional manner.
d. 
Building entrances.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Recessed entrances; similar to buildings in the historic downtown district.
[2] 
Primary facade entrance.
(5) 
Building type.
a. 
Storefront type. The storefront is part of the first floor of the building that infills the structural bay.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Structural bays 20 to 40 feet wide.
[2] 
Sixty percent of each storefront bay to be glass.
[3] 
Storefronts that are markedly different then the wall material.
[4] 
Awnings that fit with the storefront.
[5] 
Through the use of storefront, commercial buildings should have display windows on the first floor.
[6] 
That the overall width of the storefront reflect that of the individual tenant spaces, and that architectural detailing, such as pilasters, be used to separate storefronts along the same facade.
[7] 
When a building contains a secondary frontage, the storefront should also wrap the corner sufficiently.
[8] 
The use of a knee wall, kneeboard, or bulkhead below the sill of the storefront.
[9] 
The use of transom windows above the head of the storefront. It is encouraged that these windows be made to read as distinct openings through the use of a more significant header by adding additional ornament or by treating them as separate cased openings rather than just a continuation of the storefront system.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Bay windows or projections greater than two feet.
[2] 
Storefront glass greater than 10 feet high.
[3] 
Storefronts that are recessed greater than three feet from the face of the building.
[4] 
Awning material used as infill for storefront material.
[5] 
Primary or secondary building facades which are lacking or void of architectural detail/storefront/openings/blind arcades.
b. 
Office building type. Low-rise office building where the first floor is not retail.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
At least 20% windows on the first floor.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Primary or secondary building facades which are lacking or void of architectural detail/storefront/openings/blind arcades.
c. 
Parking garage type.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Retail or other commercial on the first floor at 70% of street-facing facades.
[2] 
A facade that matches the motif of the historic business district.
002 Side Entrance.tif
Side Entrance
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Front entrance to the garage.
[2] 
Primary or secondary building facades which are lacking or void of architectural detail/storefront/openings/blind arcades.
d. 
Residential building type. A residential house converted to an office or commercial use. See the residential § 2-539, Residential building permit review, Subsection (c), Design guidelines.
e. 
National chain type (massing, materials and colors) The materials and colors of commercial building designs that are obviously national or regional prototypes shall be given particular attention as they relate to their new Kirkwood-specific context.
(i) 
Preferred.
[1] 
Kirkwood-specific building colors and materials that contribute and are equally balanced with that of their neighboring buildings and environment.
(ii) 
Discouraged.
[1] 
Building colors and materials designed to display a corporate identity.
[2] 
Primary or secondary building facades which are lacking or void of architectural detail/storefront/openings/blind arcades.
(6) 
Signage (NB and HB only). In order to keep the Historic Business District and Neighborhood Business District as pedestrian friendly, signage on a building is strictly limited to street address and building or business identification.
a. 
Preferred.
(i) 
Backlit signs, through the use of reverse opaque channel letters (not translucent).
(ii) 
Individual cast or cut metal letters that are consistent with the architecture of the building.
(iii) 
Signboards that are a consistent color and size for the development; no larger than 12 inches by 24 inches.
(iv) 
Signage on the front of the building awnings.
(v) 
Awing color and its signage that is consistent per building; signage shall be integral to the awning.
(vi) 
Externally lit or indirectly lit signs. Signs illuminated by gooseneck light fixtures.
(vii) 
Signs that protrude from the building's face where the structure is integrated with the signage.
(viii) 
Monument signs should contain a minimum two-feet-zero-inch H masonry base as well as a full landscape surround.
(ix) 
Signs should be spaced along the building or property in a manner which relates to the individual retail spaces which make up the building and should not be grouped at a corner or secondary facade; rather they should be integrated into a stand-alone multi-tenant monument sign.
b. 
Discouraged.
(i) 
Advertising or depictions of available services anywhere on the building.
(ii) 
Phone numbers or web addresses on the building signage.
(iii) 
Internally lit plastic-faced cabinet signs.
(iv) 
Menu boards visible from the adjacent street front.
Examples of Recommended Signs:
002 Ex of Recommended Signs_1.tif
002 Ex of Recommended Signs_2.tif
Signs That Protrude from the Building's Face Where the Structure Is Integrated With the Signage
002 Ex of Recommended Signs_3.tif
002 Ex of Recommended Signs_4.tif
[Ord. No. 10156, § 1, 11-21-2013]