Village of Northport, NY
Suffolk County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
A. 
Applications for the construction, reconstruction, alteration or demolition of buildings and signs shall be reviewed by the Architectural and Historic Review Board for strict compliance with the mandatory standards given in § 13-11 below, and in Chapters 243, Signs. 191, Lighting and 247, Site Plan, as may be relevant and subject to requests for waiver(s) as provided in § 13-8.
B. 
Applications for the construction, reconstruction, alteration or demolition of buildings shall be reviewed for their reasonable compliance with the guidelines given in § 13-12 below. Applicants shall demonstrate a good-faith effort to incorporate desired design features into their projects.
C. 
Further, applications shall be reviewed for the potential to produce adverse effects to a building, structure or site that has been designated as a landmark through the process described herein in § 13-13, or that qualifies as a landmark according to the definition provided in § 13-3 above. In making determinations under this section the Board shall consider:
(1) 
The general appropriateness of proposed exterior design, arrangements, texture and materials with respect to the historical and architectural value and significance of the building or structure and its relationship to the historic and architectural value of the surrounding area.
(2) 
Any other factors relating to aesthetic considerations which the Board deems pertinent to the benefit of the Village due to the historic significance of the structure or building and surrounding area.
D. 
Applications for the construction, reconstruction, alteration or demolition of landmark property, or property that lies within a historic overlay district, shall be reviewed with reference to the United States Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings. In any conflict with the mandatory standards given in § 13-11 below, and in Chapters 243, Signs, 191, Lighting and 247, Site Plan, and with the guidelines given in § 13-12 below, historical considerations shall prevail, except where public safety would be compromised.
A. 
Local orientation. The use of architectural prototypes for chain, franchise or formula businesses is prohibited.
(1) 
Such businesses are required to locate in buildings that are either newly designed in accordance with the standards and guidelines of this chapter, or in existing buildings that retain an indigenous character while adapted to the new use.
(2) 
Identifying features of chain, franchise or formula businesses that contribute to excessive similarity of commercial areas and that erode local character shall be modified to reflect local conditions. Such features include, but are not limited to architectural building type, building and sign materials, building and sign colors, and window treatments.
B. 
Pedestrian orientation. Buildings shall be designed and situated for the comfort, convenience and safety of pedestrians.
(1) 
Main entrances shall be prominent, and readily identifiable and distinguished from other access points into the building.
(2) 
Main entrances shall open onto sidewalks and/or pedestrian pathways.
(3) 
All sides of commercial buildings facing a public thoroughfare shall have windows of a sufficient size to provide pedestrian interest, convey life and activity inside the building, and provide eyes on the street. Theaters and auditoriums are exempted from this provision.
C. 
Windows.
(1) 
Window glazing shall be clear glass with minimal obstruction from permanent shades, blinds or curtains, interior displays or such window signs as allowed under Chapter 243, Signs. Stained, colored and tinted glass may be used as decorative elements in a limited fashion.
(2) 
Newly constructed building facades shall have a maximum of 60% window coverage.
(3) 
The use of mirrored and reflective glass is prohibited.
D. 
Fences, garden walls and retaining walls. Fences, retaining walls and other built landscape elements shall be designed to visually complement buildings on the site and in the immediate vicinity. Materials and colors shall be coordinated with other built landscape elements on the site such as walkway paving and curbing.
E. 
Architectural design: Highway Business District.
(1) 
Building surface treatments shall be consistent on all sides visible from the public street and any residential uses.
(2) 
The facades of retail and mixed-use buildings containing three or more uses with separate entrances shall be articulated so that major single uses and groups of smaller, subsidiary uses appear housed in identifiable parts, the whole being conceived as a building complex. This may be accomplished through variations in facade projections, roof height, overhangs, window and door treatments, building wings or attached lesser structures, etc.
(3) 
Accessory structures shall be designed to coordinate with primary structures.
(4) 
Buildings shall be designed to add greenery to the corridor through features that will host plantings such as window boxes, foundation plantings, container plantings, trellises or trellis systems, arbors, pergolas etc.
(5) 
Facade elements and building ornamentation that appear false, inconsistent with the primary architectural style, disproportionate, or inauthentic are prohibited. Examples include undersized and nonfunctional window shutters and cupolas.
F. 
Automotive uses. Canopies shall be designed to coordinate with building architecture, with such features as peaked roofs and supporting columns with brick or stone bases.
A. 
Desired features.
(1) 
A diverse mix of architectural styles is welcomed and encouraged. However, architectural styles traditional to the northern shore of Long Island are preferred. Elements of such preferred traditional architecture include:
(a) 
Roofs: varied roofline; pitched and shingled roofs; dormers, gables, and other roof extensions; slate, asphalt or wood shingles.
(b) 
Siding: natural materials including red common brick, clapboard, shingles, and stone; modern equivalents approved by the New York State Historic Preservation Office.
(c) 
Windows: divided panes, mullions, shutters, vertical orientation, bay windows.
(d) 
Coloring: natural, muted tones; white.
(2) 
Building design, proportion and scale should relate to the context of its site and of surrounding uses.
(3) 
New buildings constructed in designated gateway areas to the Village, located at the intersections of Route 25A and Woodbine Avenue, Reservoir Avenue, Laurel Avenue and Main Street/Waterside Avenue, shall be designed with consideration for their gateway location. Architecture should reflect the Village's identity as a locally-oriented residential community with a sense of history and tradition.
(4) 
Buildings are encouraged to incorporate overhangs, porticoes, porches, arcades and other features that offer pedestrians protection from the elements and transition from indoors to outdoors.
(5) 
Entrance foyers, plazas, patios, extended building aprons and other areas that provide opportunity for social interaction are encouraged.
(6) 
Ecological building design, including the use of recycled materials, energy efficient construction, green (i.e., planted) roofs, etc., is supported and encouraged.
(7) 
Brick and stone are preferred materials used for retaining and landscape walls.
(8) 
Low, decorative walls and fences are encouraged to screen parking and storage areas.
B. 
Undesired features. The following architectural features are discouraged:
(1) 
Architectural styles, designs and materials identified with other parts of the country and the world.
(2) 
Chain link fences.
(3) 
High intensity or fluorescent colors.