Township of Hamilton, NJ
Atlantic County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents

§ 203-145 Intent.

The intent of this article is to provide Hamilton Township with information which is necessary to preserve its environment and to assure the orderly growth and development of the township. It is therefore recognized that, in order to promote land uses which support the public health, safety and welfare, protect public and private property and are reasonably consistent and compatible with the natural laws governing the physical, chemical and ecological environment of the township, environmental impact and site analysis statements, herein known as an "EIS," shall be required to assure a thorough documentation of every project. It is in this context that this article is set forth.

§ 203-146 Requirements for environmental impact statements.

A. 
Requirements for EIS documentation.
(1) 
Requirements for EIS documentation are modified pursuant to the environmental review checklist attached hereto.[1] Applicants need only to submit documentation as indicated by the category of the project.
[1]
Editor's Note: The environmental review checklist is located at the end of this chapter.
(2) 
In all instances, however, the Planning Board shall have the authority to require either a full EIS or any further information or documentation as the Board may deem necessary or appropriate to assure a full and proper consideration and disposition of the particular application.
(3) 
In the case of nonresidential developments seeking a use variance, a full EIS submission shall be prepared unless otherwise waived under the appropriate guidelines of this chapter.
B. 
Waiver of requirements. When acting upon applications requiring an EIS or equivalent, the Planning Board shall have the power to grant such waivers from environmental assessment and impact requirements established herein as may be reasonable and within the purpose and intent of the provisions of this article or if requiring a specific element of the EIS is impractical or will exact undue hardship because of peculiar conditions pertaining to the land in question; provided, however, that no such waiver shall be granted unless the applicant shall submit written findings briefly outlining the basis and rationale for such request.
C. 
The Planning Board may waive any or all requirements of the EIS for industrial development as may be reasonable and within the purpose and standards of this article, provided that such development is located in an approved industrial park and a waiver request is submitted as part of the site plan application package.

§ 203-147 Preparation and content of environmental impact statement.

The environmental impact statement should be prepared using an interdisciplinary approach. The qualifications of the person(s) who prepared each of the various elements of the statement shall be identified in a separate section of the EIS. References shall be cited throughout the statement as appropriate and listed fully using a consistent, standard format.

§ 203-148 Format.

The environmental impact statement shall be bound or in a loose-leaf binder and submitted on paper 8 1/2 inches by 11 inches. Each major section of the statement shall be clearly identified and shall begin on a separate page. All maps, plans and aerial photographs included in the statement shall specify a North point, graphic scale, date of preparation, source of information and, when appropriate, boundary lines. Maps, plans and aerial photographs submitted in each major section of the statement shall be at appropriate scales to facilitate comparative analyses and assessments of environmental impacts.

§ 203-149 Contents of environmental impact statement.

The EIS shall contain the following elements, as specified below:
A. 
Cover page. The cover page shall indicate:
(1) 
That the document is an EIS for (state name or title of application).
(2) 
The name of the proposed facility.
(3) 
Its location within the township.
(4) 
The name, address and telephone number of the person who prepared the EIS.
(5) 
The date of preparation of the EIS and/or revision dates.
B. 
Executive summary. A one-page summary containing the following elements shall be placed at the beginning of the EIS:
(1) 
A brief description of the proposed project, including a summary traffic analysis, fiscal impact analysis, total number of units by type and transparency overlay maps at a scale of one inch equals 2,000 feet.
(2) 
A summary of major beneficial and adverse environmental impacts of the proposed facility.
(3) 
A summary of major alternatives considered.
(4) 
The township, county, state and federal approvals required or received for the proposed facility, if any.
(5) 
Any other information deemed appropriate.
C. 
Table of contents. The EIS shall contain a table of contents indicating the page numbers of the major sections and subsections of the EIS, as well as any appendixes and accompanying exhibits.
D. 
Inventory. The applicant shall succinctly describe the existing environmental conditions of the site and surrounding region in sufficient detail to assist in the location and design of the facility, provide a basis for the applicant's assessment of the probable beneficial and adverse impacts of the proposed facility and enable the township to make the findings for permit approval. General inventory requirements for each facility type shall be as required herein.
E. 
Project description. The applicant shall succinctly describe what he proposes to do and where and how he proposes to do it during construction and operation of the facility. The project description shall include written text and graphic materials, including a site plan which may contain as much of the project description requirements for each facility type as required herein.
F. 
Assessment. The applicant shall succinctly assess the probable beneficial and adverse impacts of the proposed facility on the built and natural environment as described in the inventory section of the EIS. Where appropriate, on-site primary impacts and off-site secondary impacts shall be assessed. Specific assessment requirements vary depending upon the sensitivity of the land and water features of the site and the scale and complexity of the proposed facility. In general, the assessment shall be made from the long-term perspective that each generation is a trustee of the natural and built environment for future generations.
G. 
Unavoidable adverse environmental impact. The applicant shall describe probable adverse environmental impacts of the facility that cannot be avoided, including irretrievable commitments of resources, which shall be listed in the order of their relative magnitude.
H. 
Techniques to minimize adverse environmental impacts. The applicant shall describe the steps he will take to minimize or avoid adverse environmental impacts during the facility's construction, operation or removal both at the site and in the surrounding region. The applicant's program for ascertaining and verifying the accuracy of the environmental assessment of the facility and the actual effects of project construction shall be described in narrative and graphic form.
I. 
Alternatives.
(1) 
When required on the environmental review checklist,[1] the applicant shall briefly identify, describe and analyze design alternatives.
[1]
Editor's Note: The environmental review checklist is located at the end of this chapter.
(2) 
The discussion of design alternatives shall include an evaluation of design alternatives that might avoid or minimize some or all of the probable adverse environmental impacts of the project. The applicant shall summarize the costs and benefits of the design alternatives analyzed and presented. A brief summary of the reasons for the acceptability or nonacceptability of each alternative shall be given. For residential and sewerage facilities, the presentation of design alternatives may include a brief narrative and accompanying sketch plans.
(3) 
For residential and nonresidential projects seeking a use variance, the applicant shall also briefly state alternative uses of the site considered and the reasons for rejection.
J. 
Other required licenses, permits and approvals. The applicant shall list all known licenses, permits and other approvals required by township, county, state or federal law for the construction and operation of the proposed facility. The status of each shall be identified.
K. 
Documentation. The applicant shall prepare a reference list, using a consistent standard format, of all published materials, reports, manuscripts or other written sources of information on the facility, its site and surrounding region consulted and employed in the preparation of the environmental impact statement. A separate reference list of all government agencies and individuals that either provided information orally and by letter or coordinated the EIS shall be prepared, with the dates and locations of all meetings specified. The documentation section shall also indicate the person(s) that prepared each major section and subsection of EIS, including their qualifications.
L. 
The required elements set forth in § 203-151 of this article.

§ 203-150 Review process; schedules.

The same schedule and conditions applicable to the full site plan requirements shall also apply to periods of a submitted EIS.

§ 203-151 Environmental impact and site analysis statement requirements. [1]

Inventory and plan elements shall be as follows:
A. 
General site location map. The site of the proposed facility shall be located generally on a United States Geological Survey Map of the township.
B. 
Site location map and existing site conditions.
(1) 
A site location map shall be provided consistent with the standards established for a site plan submission as set forth in the Hamilton Township subdivision and site plan review regulations.
(2) 
Existing site conditions shall be outlined pursuant to the requirements set forth in the Hamilton Township site plan review regulations.
(3) 
The applicant shall furnish a written statement and appropriate maps locating and explaining future development anticipated by the applicant, if any, to both the site and adjacent land owned or leased by the applicant or that the applicant has an option to purchase or lease.
C. 
Geology and soils. A map and text shall identify and describe the physical features of the site, including but not limited to:
(1) 
Soil types, as classified and mapped by the United States Soil Conservation Service, New Jersey Pinelands Commission and verified on site by a competent professional, i.e., soils engineer.
(2) 
A soils data chart with descriptions indicating the following information for each soil type identified within the site:
(a) 
Drainage class.
(b) 
Permeability class.
(c) 
Seasonal high-water table.
(d) 
Foundation limitations.
(e) 
Agricultural land capacity class.
(f) 
Erosion potential.
(g) 
Septic tank suitability, if appropriate.
(h) 
Trafficability (dust hazard).
(i) 
Depth of and name of the first geologic formation named on New Jersey Geologic Map, Atlas Sheet 40, including prequaternary deposits.
(j) 
Degree of acidity and alkalinity of soil (pH of 5.5 or lower and pH of 8.5 and higher).
(3) 
Engineering soil classification, as mapped by the Soil Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(4) 
An engineering design characteristics chart indicating the following information for each engineering soil classification within the site:
(a) 
Limitations of soils for roadcuts and fills.
(b) 
Road alignment characteristics.
(c) 
Limitations of soils for embankments.
(d) 
Pavement support characteristics.
(5) 
The location, nature and thickness of any areas containing landfill materials on and within 2,000 feet of the site, a description of the landfill materials and the appropriate beginning and cessation dates of landfill activities.
(6) 
Potentially valuable mineral, gravel or other subsurface resources of the site shall be identified.
(7) 
Soil erosion and sediment control plan. The site plan or a separate plan shall identify, describe and locate the following items, where applicable, for the proposed facility:
(a) 
Specific sediment control methods and structure, including but not limited to seeding, mulching, sodding, diversions, waterways, slope stabilization structures and sedimentation basins, including the design rationale for permanent sedimentation basins or other waterways.
(b) 
A schedule for the installation of planned erosions and sedimentation control measures, stating anticipated starting and completion dates for clearing and grading, timing of storm drain or culvert installations, duration of exposure of soils and critical areas stabilization, both temporary and permanent.
(c) 
An outline of procedures for the maintenance of the erosion control facilities, including disposal of materials to be removed from these control facilities.
D. 
Hydrology. A topographic map of the site and its surroundings to a distance of 300 feet, with contour intervals consistent with the Hamilton Township subdivision and site plan review regulations.
(1) 
Surface water.
(a) 
Existing natural and man-made watercourses, including drainageways, swales and water control structures, on and within 300 feet of the site, with their location, width, slope, capacity and direction of flow.
(b) 
Flood hazard areas or flood-prone areas with cross sections of watercourses at an appropriate scale and at appropriate intervals along the watercourse, showing extent of floodplain, top of bank, normal water level and bottom elevation.
(c) 
Existing lakes, ponds, bays and estuaries within or adjacent to the site, with location, extent and water level elevation.
(d) 
Existing storm drainage systems, including storm sewers, drainage ditches and retention or detention basins, on or adjacent to the site, with location, extent, capacity and direction of flow.
(e) 
Existing stormwater runoff from the project site and upstream watershed areas and calculations in accordance with Article XII, § 203-132, used to determine the same.
(f) 
Existing slope analysis, with slopes of 0% to 1%, 2% to 4%, 5% to 9%, 10% to 14% and 15% or more delineated.
(2) 
Groundwater.
(a) 
Aquifer recharge areas.
(b) 
Direction of groundwater movement.
(c) 
Yields of existing wells within 1/2 mile of the site, including a description of aquifer(s) being utilized.
E. 
Water quality.
(1) 
Surface water. A water quality inventory of such water bodies directly affected by the proposed facility shall be prepared utilizing existing authoritative sources of information, including but not limited to Hamilton Township, the Atlantic County Board of Health, the Department of Environmental Protection, the United States Geological Survey, the United States Environmental Protection Agency or the Pinelands Commission. The classifications of such affected water bodies, their water quality standards and their status in meeting the established water quality standards shall be described. Existing restrictive uses of these water bodies shall be identified. The need to prevent additional data shall be based upon the relative sensitivity of the water body affected.
(2) 
Groundwater. Where groundwaters are to be utilized for potable water supplies, the water quality inventory shall include established drinking water standards, water quality standards established for groundwaters, the location of test wells and the results of samples taken. Proposed well sites shall be marked on a project site map.
F. 
Water supply. If potable water is not provided from on-site wells, the existing and proposed potable water supply system available to the site shall be identified and described in maps and text, indicating:
(1) 
Source of supply.
(2) 
Adequacy of supply, including current and anticipated maximum water demand within the entire serviced area as available by the owner of said supply.
(3) 
Pressure and volume of water available.
G. 
Wastewater treatment facilities. The existing and proposed wastewater treatment facilities available to the site shall be identified and described in maps and text, indicating:
(1) 
Availability of existing facilities, including status of sewer connection ban, if any.
(2) 
The adequacy of existing facilities, including:
(a) 
Design capacity, type of treatment provided and location of outfall.
(b) 
Current flows, including average monthly during highest month and highest twenty-four-hour flow.
(c) 
Outstanding commitments to accept additional flows from other projects.
(d) 
Water quality standards and effluent limitations.
(3) 
Proposed facilities, including:
(a) 
Design capacity, type of treatment to be provided and location of outfall.
(b) 
Applicable water quality standards and effluent limitations.
(4) 
Where individual septic tanks are proposed, indicate:
(a) 
The location of registered or licensed water supplies within 500 feet of the project.
(b) 
Field data describing results of soil borings, percolation test and seasonally high groundwater table conditions, with specific locations, including the dates of these tests. Soil borings shall be classified by the unified soil classification system.
[1]
Editor's Note: Environmental Impact Statements are located at the end of this chapter.

§ 203-152 Utilities plan.

A. 
The site plan or a separate plan shall identify, locate and describe the proposed type and capacity of the following utilities, where applicable, which serve the site and are employed at the site by the facility:
(1) 
Water supply system.
(2) 
Sanitary sewer system.
(3) 
Storm drainage system.
(4) 
Electricity service.
(5) 
Gas service.
(6) 
Telephone service.
(7) 
Solid waste disposal and garbage collection service.
(8) 
Cable television system.
(9) 
Fire alarm system.
(10) 
Steam distribution system.
(11) 
Street and on-site lighting system.
(12) 
Liquid, chemical, gaseous wastes, etc.
B. 
The demand for the utility generated by the proposed facility shall be specified, and, where possible, the existing capacity of the utility and the remaining unused capacity of the utility shall be indicated.
C. 
Storm drainage analysis should include the expected amount of runoff from the site after development, the design capacity of any proposed retention facilities and the expected velocities at drain and culvert outlets. Calculations, in accordance with Article XII, § 203-132, should be included.
D. 
The utilities plan shall also include a strategy for water conservation, including techniques for recycling of water when the individual land use so dictates, i.e., commercial and industrial uses.

§ 203-153 Description of vegetation required.

A map and text shall identify and describe the vegetation of the site, including but not limited to the following items:
A. 
The vegetation types present, indicating the major species by scientific and common name, indicating both overstory and understory species.
B. 
The general character, including age and size, of major stands of trees.
C. 
The location of all specimen trees, all trees with a diameter of 12 inches or greater and the location and description of threatened or endangered plants.
D. 
The method of delineating limits of clearing in areas to be preserved shall be shown: This may take the form of snow fence, silt fence, flagging or such other means as may be approved by the Planning or Zoning Board.
[Added 7-7-1997 by Ord. No. 1261-97]

§ 203-154 Identification of wildlife.

A map and text shall identify and describe the wildlife on the site, indicated by their common and scientific names, including but not limited to the following items:
A. 
The location and character of distinct and wildlife habitats that are essential to the continued nesting, resting, breeding and feeding of significant populations of fish and wildlife in the Pinelands.
B. 
A wildlife management plan shall be submitted indicating:
(1) 
The areas of open space designed to support elements of a wildlife management plan.
(2) 
A landscape plan which includes plants with food and habitat value to wildlife.
(3) 
The utilization of stormwater detention-retention ponds or multipurpose recreational and wildlife management purposes.
(4) 
The protection of critical habitats of threatened and endangered species.

§ 203-155 Energy plan.

A. 
The applicant shall identify all sources of energy to be furnished at the site and shall document their availability.
B. 
An energy plan shall specify anticipated energy utilization for space heating and cooling, industrial processes and other uses and energy conservation techniques to be implemented, including landscaping and building siting as a result of a microclimatic analysis. It shall further describe alternative sources or types of energy to serve the facility, compare their efficiency and cost and state the reasons for selection of the preferred alternative. The energy plan shall also discuss how the facility will manage its energy load in order to reduce peak load demand or shift its load off the system-wide peak of the supplying utility system.
C. 
In addition, the applicant shall document the energy efficiency programs to be instituted for common spaces such as community buildings, pools, etc.

§ 203-156 Identification of public services.

A. 
Existing public and private services relevant to the proposed facility and available at the site and its surrounding region shall be described and plotted on a township base map with appropriate service routes being marked. Such services shall include but not be limited to police and fire protection, first-aid and ambulance services, health services, public and private educational facilities, school bus routes, public bus routes, facilities, cultural facilities, etc.
B. 
All such facilities shall be categorized by type, existing capacity to serve and potential capacity, based upon the projected use and reserve capacity.

§ 203-157 Transportation and impact report.

[Amended 7-7-1997 by Ord. No. 1261-97]
A. 
Requirement. The maintenance of a safe transportation network is important to the public safety and welfare. The need to identify all hazards or problems created by proposed development is an essential step for the protection of the public and the assurance of orderly land development patterns. Traffic studies will be required for all fast-food stores, convenience stores, banks and any facilities with a drive-in window plus other commercial facilities of at least 10,000 square feet, housing developments of over 40 houses and developments with 45 parking spaces or more. Other developments may be required to provide traffic studies by the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Adjustment or their traffic consultant.
(1) 
The transportation impact report is designed to identify the traffic impacts that are generated by proposed use or uses and to identify all improvements required to ensure safe ingress to and egress from, maintenance or adequate roadway capacity and elimination of hazardous conditions as related to proposed development or developments.
(a) 
Traffic network site description. A detailed description of the highway network within the study area, description of the proposed land uses, the anticipated stages of construction and the anticipated competition date of the proposed land development shall be provided. (Note: Given the size and complexity of the land uses in Hamilton Township, the Planning Board or Zoning Board of Adjustment, upon the advice of its professional staff, may request additional analysis of specific highway networks, intersections, etc., as deemed necessary to develop comprehensive understanding of existing traffic conditions). This description, which shall be in the form of map at a scale of at least one inch equals 400 feet, shall include the following terms: all major intersection, all proposed and existing ingress and egress locations, all existing roadway widths and rights-of-way, all existing and proposed public transportation services and facilities within the study areas and the 85th percentile speed.
(b) 
In addition, any changes to the highway network within the study area projects shall be mapped and described. This description shall include the above items, as well as any proposed construction project that would alter the width and/or alignment of the present highway. All sources of such information shall be identified with reference to title, author, date and publisher.
(c) 
The study area shall include areas that are impacted by the development. The study area should be confirmed with the traffic consultant for the Planning Board or Zoning Board of Adjustment consultant prior to beginning the traffic study.
(2) 
A description of existing traffic conditions shall be provided indicating the following:
(a) 
A twenty-four-hour traffic count shall be conducted for period of three weekdays (Monday to Friday) on all roadways which have direct access to the proposed development site. Prior to conducting traffic counts, the applicant shall submit a map identifying the location(s) for said site to the traffic consultant and seek approval to conduct counts at the specified locations. The existing average daily traffic volume and the highest average peak hour volume for any weekday hour between 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. shall be recorded. Where such counts are conducted at intersections, delineation of all turning movements shall be made on fifteen-minute intervals. These traffic volumes shall be averaged to determine the average hourly peak traffic volumes and projection of the 30th highest hour volume for the three days between Monday and Friday. The applicant shall make available, upon request, all worksheets and field data used to generate figures documenting existing traffic conditions. Alternate traffic counts may be required during weekend or other peak time periods to anticipate seasonal variations in recreational traffic or other peaking characteristics. This requirement will be at the discretion of the traffic consultant, based upon the use proposed.
(b) 
All commercial activities will require Saturday hourly directional counts and will require manual turning movement counts between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
B. 
Plan. Transportation impact of the proposed project shall provide accurate data on the traffic condition of roads in the immediate vicinity of proposal at the time it is actually developed.
(1) 
Transportation impact of the development. The average weekday trip generation rates and the highest average hourly a.m., p.m. and Saturday trip generating rates for the proposed use shall be determined from the Institute of Transportation Engineer's trip generating report of comparable source information recognized by the traffic engineering profession. (Note: For most highways in Hamilton Township, the peak hours occur between 4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m., except as required for seasonal evaluations. On such roads, the worst time condition of the road is unlikely to change solely because single use has different peak hours. Large development of regional impact may, however, alter this generalization; hence, data for both time periods must be provided.)
(2) 
Determination of roadway levels of service:
(a) 
Calculate roadway levels of service. Roadway services volumes shall be calculated for all roadways in the study area utilizing the latest Highway Capacity Manual and New Jersey Department of Transportation approved software.
(b) 
Levels of service shall be calculated for existing conditions, future conditions without site traffic and future (build-out) conditions with site traffic.
(3) 
Determination of intersection service level.
(a) 
Calculated intersection levels of service. Intersection level of service shall be calculated for all intersections in the study utilizing the latest Highway Capacity Manual and New Jersey Department of Transportation approved software.
(b) 
Levels of service shall be calculated for existing conditions, future conditions without site traffic and future (build-out) conditions with site traffic.
(4) 
Analysis of transportation impact. The future projected traffic as determined above will be assessed on the area transportation network. The analysis will determine the existing level of service, the future level of service in the year of build-out and the future level of service at build-out. In addition, improvements that may be required to determine an adequate level of service C in the future will be determined. The applicant will determine the percent impact of the site on the various impacted roadways and intersections, any improvements needed to achieve level of service C in the future, the cost of these improvements and the developer's fair share contribution for these improvements.
(5) 
If violation of state or federal air quality standard is found to exist or will result from the proposed development, the applicant will be required to pay pro rata share of the cost necessary to make the required improvements to meet the state or federal air quality standards. Since development will not be allowed without this improvement in place, the developer that causes this violation may have to stage development or pay for the entire improvement to be allowed to develop fully.
(6) 
Traffic control devices. Whenever, as a result of additional traffic generated by proposed development, the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices determines the need for traffic signal or regulatory sign, the developer shall be responsible for securing all permits prior to obtaining final approval of all traffic devices and signs. If the traffic signal is warranted by the traffic that is produced by the development, or would not be required without this development, the applicant shall be required to provide the traffic signal or bond for the full cost of the construction of the traffic signal.
(7) 
Pedestrian circulation plan. A pedestrian circulation plan shall be created indicating:
(a) 
The route and volume relationships of pedestrian traffic from sources such as recreation, work, schools, churches, etc., within the project boundary and within one mile of the project boundary shall be assessed for adequacy.
(b) 
Pedestrian route linkages shall be shown with adjoining projects if such relationships exist. If they do not exist, then the reasons why they do not shall be substantiated.
(c) 
This pedestrian demand volume shall consist of cumulative increase of pedestrian traffic volume based upon projected projects, as stipulated by the developer and concurred by Hamilton Township, and the anticipated pedestrian traffic that will be generated by the proposed development.
(d) 
A separate pedestrian circulation site plan sheet shall be provided showing all sidewalk and pedestrian pathways.
(8) 
Truck traffic generated as a result of commercial use shall be identified in terms of:
(a) 
Volume and hours of traffic.
(b) 
Estimated origin-destination of such vehicles shall be mapped entering Hamilton Township.
(c) 
Routes from major arterial to the project site, indicating whether or not residential areas are penetrated and, if so, why.
(d) 
Loading and unloading areas or commercial traffic shall be identified on the site plan, indicating size, turnaround, etc., in sufficient detail to make an appropriate analysis of adequacy.
(e) 
Truck traffic shall be identified with references to size and weight. Frequency of use shall be indicated as well as the adequacy of said roadway to carry such weight and volume.
(f) 
Truck routes shall be determined and show all bridge crossings from the site to the state highways via all routes proposed for use.
(9) 
Mass transportation alternatives. The applicant shall describe the mass transportation alternatives either to the applicant presently or in the future. The relationship to future mass transportation projects shall be addressed. The application at a minimum shall show existing bus routes and their relationship to the project. School bus routes with proposed pickup and dropoff points shall be identified on the site plan.

§ 203-158 Open space and recreation plan.

A. 
Map.
(1) 
A map and accompanying text shall identify the site and locate and describe the types and quantities, physical accessibility and availability for public use of recreation facilities and services within two miles of the site, including but not limited to the following: waterways, beaches, wetlands, marinas, boat docks and launching platforms, playgrounds, parks, forests, natural areas, tennis courts, swimming pools, bikeways, etc. The extent of existing use and of unused capacity of these facilities shall also be indicated based upon the anticipated schedule of development.
(2) 
The relationship of the outlying recreational facilities and the utility to the needs of the proposed project shall be clearly documented with respect to demand and supply considerations.
B. 
Open space and recreation plan.
(1) 
The proposed location, type and quantity of open space provided by the applicant at the site shall be classified and described. The proposed location, type and quantity of areas and structures provided by the applicant for on-site active and passive indoor and outdoor recreation shall be classified and described. The applicant shall discuss how the open space and recreation areas and structure areas are to be maintained. The applicant shall demonstrate how the proposed open space and recreation system links with, enhances or expands upon the contiguous or adjacent open space and recreation areas and specify how the public's access to the open space and recreation system is assured, either by public ownership, dedicated land, easements or other suitable mechanisms.
(2) 
The recreational plan shall present a detailed breakdown of recreational activities or the population of the proposed project by age groups and sex. Such plan shall also indicate the recreational uses that have seasonal value, i.e., summer, winter, fall and spring, as well as day or night use. (NOTE: At a minimum, such plan shall use as a guideline the standards and comments set forth in: A Guide For Recreational Design Review, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, Division of Local Government Services, September 1976; Site Planning Standards, Joseph DeChiara and Lee F Koppelman, McGraw-Hill, 1978; and Urban Planning and Design Criteria, Third Edition, Joseph DeChiara and Lee E. Koppelman, McGraw-Hill.)
(3) 
Within the scope of recreational activities required by the projected population of the proposed project, the plan shall identify the extent to which those recreational needs shall be accommodated within the project or by existing community facilities.
(4) 
All recreational areas and facilities shall be designed in accordance with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection publication Administration Guidelines: Barrier-Free Design Standards for Parks and Recreational Facilities and, if in the Pinelands Area, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 7:50-6.143(a)2 and 6.144(a)1-3.
[Amended 11-20-1989 by Ord. No. 1014-89]
C. 
General requirements.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
(1) 
Prior to preliminary approval, the applicant shall submit, for review by the Township Planner, manufacturer's descriptive data and supporting information for all park and recreation apparatus.
(2) 
In the designation of common open space areas, consideration shall be given to providing for continuity of opera space between sections of a development and between open space on adjacent lands. Open space shall be distributed throughout the development so that there is a hierarchy of activities from preservation areas to passive open space adjacent to and between each residential cluster. Designating all open space in one portion of a development is discouraged.
(3) 
Usable recreation space should be provided for active recreation within 1/4 mile of all units. Part of this recreation component may consist of a lake or pond having a constant water level, but excluding therefrom detention and retention basins. Any larger preservation spaces shall be contiguous to and directly related to dwelling structures. Usable recreation space may be improved with facilities for swimming pools, tot-lots, playgrounds and quiet outdoor sports such as but not limited to tennis, paddle tennis, golf, baseball, basketball, soccer, lacrosse and the like and accessory buildings such as clubhouses and pavilions. The approving authority shall have complete and final determination as to the adequacy, usefulness and functionality of lands set aside for open spaces.
(4) 
Recreational facilities should be operated for the benefit of the residents of the development. They should not be commercial enterprises open to anyone who pays a fee.
(5) 
Common open space for recreational purposes shall be provided in all major subdivisions and residential site plans in an amount as required by Chapter 203 and by this section, where applicable. The developer shall improve this area for active and passive recreation as specified herein. Plans for the improvement of this recreation area shall be an integral component of any preliminary plat and final construction drawings for any major subdivision or residential site plan.
(6) 
The developer shall have the option to post an off-tract assessment in an amount calculated pursuant to Subsection I.
(7) 
Notwithstanding the minimum area requirements for open space and recreation in Chapter 203, Land Use and Development, the following minimum requirements shall be met by all major residential developments within the township. Such open space areas shall be developed with appropriate recreational facilities sufficient to meet the needs of the residents of the proposed development, These areas shall provide recreational opportunities based on the following formula: 1/12 of one acre ( 1/20 acre) for each dwelling unit plus 5% of the gross site area for undeveloped (passive) recreation. Recreational facilities shall be provided as indicated by § 203-158E.
(8) 
Where feasible, the common open space shall connect to existing township park, recreation or conservation lands or connect into an adjacent planned development's common open space. Public pedestrian and/or bicycle paths shall be included in the open space whenever feasible and shall be designed to connect into a larger scale township system if applicable or feasible.
(9) 
There should be a close visual and physical relationship between open space and as many dwelling units as arc reasonably possible. Open space areas should weave between dwelling units generally respecting a minimum width of 50 feet and periodically widening out into significant and usable recreation areas.
D. 
Open space/recreation design guidelines.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
(1) 
An effective open space system should tie together a number of diverse recreational activity areas with adequate pedestrian pathways and auto/bicycle access for the residents it is intended to serve. As many homes as possible should have direct access to the open space of a development. Developed open space generally should not be isolated in one corner of a project.
(2) 
Active recreation should be visibly close but shall not interfere with the privacy of adjacent residents. It should be designed to accommodate the recreation needs of the project's intended age groups.
(3) 
Development in the vicinity or undeveloped open space shall be designed to protect the site's natural resources, animal habitat, flood-prone areas, etc. The undeveloped open space shall be utilized to provide protection for critical ecosystems within the project site and to preserve in perpetuity of the natural assets of the project area.
(4) 
All open space shall be recorded in the master deed for each project to reflect its permanency for such space. Such document shall be submitted to the Planning Board prior to final approval.
E. 
Recreational facilities. In all residential developments that require recreational facilities, the developer shall install, as a minimum, the following recreational facilities on the land that has been set aside for recreational purposes. The Planning Board may, at its discretion, alter the schedule of active recreation facilities required, or allow equivalent facilities such as skating rinks, picnic areas, swimming facilities, etc.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
Dwelling Units
Land
Tot Courts
Tennis Courts
Basketball Grounds
Play Fields
Multi-purpose
1 to 4
--
--
--
--
--
--
5 to 24
*
1
--
--
--
--
25 to 49
*
1
--
1
--
--
50 to 99
*
1
1
1
--
--
100 to 199
*
2
2
1
--
--
200 to 249
*
2
2
1
1
1
250 to 349
*
2
3
1
1
1
350 to 449
*
2
4
2
1
1
*NOTE: 0.05 acres per dwelling unit [plus 5% of the gross site area for undeveloped (passive) recreation].
(1) 
Tot-lots. Tot-lots shall be a minimum of 5,000 square feet excluding areas required for fencing, buffering or walkways and shall contain, as a minimum, the following improvements:
[Amended 3-21-2005 by Ord. No. 1518-2005]
(a) 
A four-foot-high chain link fence with gate or other buffering or screening bordering residential properties and roadways.
(b) 
Two benches, each to be eight feet long and constructed of aluminum.
(c) 
Two table and bench sets.
(d) 
Ground cover shall be in accordance with the requirements of the New Jersey Uniform Construction Code, Playground Safety Subcode.
(e) 
One swing set with four swings, two of which shall be tot swings, one tot chair and one slash-proof belt seat, 2 3/8 inches outside diameter; legs and top rails with 2 7/8 inches outside diameter fittings, eight feet in height.
(f) 
One single platform whirl seven feet eight inches in diameter.
(g) 
Two saddle mates with metal c springs.
(h) 
One climber, two feet by 12 feet, with a height of approximately four feet seven inches.
(i) 
One sandbox, 15 feet by 15 feet.
(j) 
One slide two feet by 14 feet, with a height of approximately six feet, and must have wraparound top rails with nonskid steps.
(k) 
One trash receptacle with retractable bottom, ten-gallon capacity, green in color.
(2) 
Playgrounds. Playgrounds shall be not less than three acres in size, excluding areas required for fencing, buffering or walkways, and shall contain, as a minimum, the following improvements:
(a) 
Not less than one tot-lot as defined above.
(b) 
Not fewer than one play lot which shall contain, as a minimum, the following improvements:
[1] 
One heavy-duty swing set with legs and top rail not less than 2 3/8 inches outside diameter and with two-and-seven-eighths-inch fittings. The swing set is to be at least 10 feet in height with not fewer than four slash-proof belt-type seats.
[2] 
One bicycle rack not less than 10 feet in length, of aluminum construction or such other materials as may be approved by the Township Planner.
(c) 
Playing fields and courts.
[1] 
Not less than 2.25 acres of seeded or sodded open space (not otherwise utilized as a tot-lot and/or playground) which shall, as a minimum, contain one of the following:
[a] 
Two basketball and two tennis courts.
[b] 
One baseball and one softball field.
[c] 
One football and one soccer field.
[2] 
Football and soccer fields may share all or portions of the same open area.
[3] 
Baseball and softball fields may share portions of the same open area.
[4] 
Where playing fields as noted above share all or portions of the same area, the layout of such fields shall be subject to the approval of the Township Planner.
(3) 
Tennis courts. Tennis courts shall be of regulation sealer and in all cases shall be constructed as follows:
(a) 
The courts shall be four inches of bituminous stabilized base on a properly prepared subgrade on 1.5 inches of FABC leveling course, and 1.5 inches SP-1 vinyl latex top course and shall be color-coated with light green for in-play and brick red for out-of-play. The sealer shall be California Products Corporation or equal as approved by the Township Planner.
(b) 
There shall be one set of ground sockets set in concrete on each court.
(c) 
There shall be one set of tennis posts 3 1/2 inches outside diameter with heavy-duty nylon tennis nets on each court.
(d) 
There shall be one reel per court.
(e) 
Tennis courts shall be surrounded with a twelve-foot-high green vinyl clad chain link fence with entrance gate and buffered planting as designated by the Township Planner.
(f) 
There shall be night lighting with timers at courts to be designated by the Township Planner.
(g) 
One bench eight feet in length and constructed of aluminum shall be installed at each court.
(4) 
Basketball courts. Basketball courts shall be a minimum size of 50 feet by 84 feet and shall contain, as a minimum, the following requirements:
(a) 
Two fan-shaped aluminum basketball backstops.
(b) 
Two four-and-one-half-inch outside diameter basketball posts with forty-eight-inch extension.
(c) 
Two double ring and double brace goals with metal nets.
(d) 
Four inches of bituminous stabilized base course on a properly prepared subgrade, 1.5 inches of FABC leveling course, and a one-inch SP-1 vinyl latex top course.
(e) 
There shall be night lighting with timers at courts to be designated by the Township Planner.
(5) 
Baseball or softball fields. The baseball/softball fields shall have a minimum slope of 2% and maximum slope of 3%, with grading to be approved by the Township Engineer, and shall contain, as a minimum, the following requirements:
(a) 
Baseball/softball field combinations should conform to the recommended standards in design.
(b) 
There shall be one backstop with four panels: two ten-foot back panels and two side panels 10 feet high with complete overhang over the back and side panels.
(c) 
There shall be two side fences, four feet high and 20 feet long, with chain link fencing on both sides of the side panels.
(d) 
There shall be two fifteen-foot-long players' benches, constructed of aluminum.
(e) 
The infield should be covered with infield dirt as required by the Township Engineer.
(6) 
Football/soccer fields. Football/soccer fields should be a minimum of 1 3/4 acres and shall have a minimum slope of 2% and maximum slope of 3% and shall be approved by the Township Engineer. All fields should conform to the recommended standards in design.
(a) 
Football/soccer field combinations should conform to the recommended standards in design.
(b) 
There shall be two combination football/soccer posts.
(c) 
There shall be two heavy-duty nylon soccer nets.
(d) 
There shall be two aluminum benches, each 15 feet in length.
(7) 
Multipurpose fields. Multipurpose fields shall be a minimum size of 250 feet by 420 feet, exclusive of area required for fencing, screening, buffering and parking facilities or other ancillary facilities, and shall contain, as a minimum, the following improvements:
(a) 
Completely grassed field.
(b) 
Baseball/softball backstop in one corner of the site.
(c) 
Football/soccer field goal posts made of pipe at the end of each field.
(d) 
The field shall have a minimum slope of 2% and maximum slope of 3%.
(e) 
There shall be night lighting with timers at courts to be designated by the Township Planner.
(8) 
Pedestrian, bicycle and fitness trails.
(a) 
Pedestrian and bicycle trails when constructed as one trail shall be a minimum of six feet wide. Fitness trails are to be a minimum of three feet wide. Trails are to be constructed free of branches or other obstructions, are to have a minimum slope of 2% and should follow the contour of the area where possible. Trails should be constructed of two-inch FABC-1 surface course over six inches of quarry blend. Paths should generally follow ground contours, streams, lakes, ponds or other natural features and shall have a designation. When crossing roadways in a development, appropriate depressed curbing, signs and crosswalk striping shall be provided.
(b) 
Walkways and bicycle paths shall have information signs. If trails are designed to be specifically used for bicycles, then a sign marked with the international bicycling symbol shall be used. The path system shall meet the following requirements:
[1] 
Fitness trails shall be twenty-piece unit with information signs explaining use of each apparatus (wooden units).
[2] 
Pedestrian walkways shall have one aluminum park bench, six feet in length, for every 1/2 mile.
[3] 
Information signs shall be placed at various points of interest on the trail.
(9) 
Neighborhood parks. A neighborhood park shall be a minimum of seven acres. Included in the minimum acreage is fencing, screening, buffering and landscaping bordering residential properties or any roadway and shall contain, as a minimum, the following requirements:
(a) 
Tot-lot: one fully enclosed with four-foot-high chain link fence and one entrance gate.
(b) 
Playground: one.
(c) 
Multipurpose paved courts: two basketball and two tennis courts.
(d) 
Multipurpose field: one baseball/softball and one combination football/soccer field.
(e) 
Picnic area: a minimum of 1/2 acre and shall have, as a minimum, five aluminum picnic tables and three grills.
(f) 
Parking area: a minimum of one car per 300 persons of population served with not fewer than 10 parking spaces with two parking spaces for the disabled.
(10) 
Barrier-free site designs for the disabled. All tot-lots, playgrounds, tennis/basketball courts, parks and any other recreation areas shall be barrier-free so as to allow accessibility for the disabled. Such areas are to be fully accessible, both in the active areas as well as in the passive areas, and shall contain, as a minimum, the following requirements:
(a) 
There shall be a minimum of two parking spaces for the handicapped with proper signage and striping.
(b) 
Walkways shall be a minimum of six feet wide for easy mobility.
(c) 
There shall be access ramps where steps are otherwise required on entrance to any recreational site. Ramps shall be four feet wide with two continuous handrails 32 inches high.
(d) 
Gates on all chain link fences shall have a clear opening of 34 inches.
(e) 
On all walkways which cross roads or sidewalks, a depressed curb shall be provided for accessibility by the handicapped.
(11) 
Community buildings. In planned developments of over 150 dwelling units, consideration shall be given toward a recreation center/community multipurpose building. Such facilities should be within walking or easy biking distance of the majority of the residents it is intended to serve.
(12) 
Other amenities, Consider jogging trails and exercise areas in an adult-orientated project. Provide benches and sitting areas along pathways where appropriate and particularly where they can incorporate or provide views of a significant landscape feature, recreational facility or interesting site design of the project. Consider area reserved for small garden plots in larger developments.
F. 
The Board may require a developer to make certain site preparation improvements to the open spaces and may require that the site preparation improvements are made a part of the plan and are noted therein. These improvements may include the following:
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
(1) 
Removal of dead or diseased trees.
(2) 
Thinning of trees or other growth to encourage more desirable growth.
(3) 
Grading and seeding.
(4) 
Improvements or protection of the natural drainage system by use of protective structures, stabilization measures and similar devices.
G. 
Development of open space and recreational facilities shall proceed at the same rate as development of the dwelling units. To assure compliance with this section, the Planning Board shall require the approval of an overall phasing plan and approval for any subdivision planned and/or clustered development.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
H. 
The requirements of this section relating to the construction of active recreation facilities may be modified and/or waived by the Planning Board's determination that both the area local to the development and Hamilton Township's park and recreation needs would be better served by an agreed cash bequest to the designated parks and recreation budget, which sums shall be added to the current year municipal budget, when received as a dedication by rider, in accordance with the provisions of N.J.S.A. 40A:4-39.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]
I. 
Contribution in-lieu of facilities.
[Added 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000; amended 12-19-2005 by Ord. No. 1550-2005]
(1) 
The amount of the contribution required pursuant hereto shall be determined by the Township based upon the cost to the Township to provide active recreational areas and the value of the land for the passive recreation area. This would apply to all residential development (including minor subdivisions) with the exception of a remainder lot from a subdivision that contains an existing single-family dwelling that would remain. An evaluation of the costs will annually be reviewed by the Township in order to determine if the per-lot contribution needs to be adjusted. The cost is established at $5,600 per lot for all major subdivisions. For all minor subdivisions, the following cost will be established:
[Amended 11-20-2006 by Ord. No. 1577-2006; 8-6-2007 by Ord. No. 1600-2007]
(a) 
An existing lot containing and retaining the dwelling unit, the following cost will be:
2 new lots = $1,000/vacant lot
3 new lots = $2,000/vacant lot
4 new lots = $3,000/vacant lot
(b) 
An existing vacant lot with no dwelling units, the following cost will be:
2 new lots = $2,000/vacant lot
3 new lots = $3,000/vacant lot
4 new lots = $4,000/vacant lot
(c) 
All of the recreation fees, plus any previous funds held in trust for this purpose, are to be made available for recreation purposes as approved by the Township Committee.
(2) 
Payment of the contribution required herein shall be made prior to the recording of the subdivision.
J. 
All development within the Pinelands Area of the township shall conform to the recreation requirements contained in Section 7:50-6.141 to 7:50-6.144 of the CMP.
[Amended 6-5-2000 by Ord. No. 1367-2000]

§ 203-159 Historical and archaeological resource analysis for non-Pinelands Areas.

A. 
The township's historic resources of the site and its relevant surrounding region shall be described via mapping and a detailed narrative description. Areas and sites of archaeological, architectural, anthropological and historic significance, including those proposed for nomination or included in the National and State Register of Historic Places, shall be identified, described and located on an appropriately scaled map or maps. An awareness of both above- and below-ground cultural resources, if any, should be documented in this section, which should include a synopsis of the effort and method that is the basis for these findings, unless a letter of interpretation that an inventory is not required has been issued by the Pinelands Commission.
B. 
In the accomplishment of the above, the following items must be identified or provided:
(1) 
The qualifications of the person or persons preparing the historic and archaeological resource analysis.
(2) 
An outline of the methodology to be provided in making determinations of historic or archaeologic significance.
(3) 
The identification and inventory of all potential landmarks, buildings, archaeological, etc., resources within the site or contiguous to it.
(4) 
If an inventory of the site reveals or involves historic buildings, archaeological artifacts or historic resources, the applicant shall specifically outline a course of action for preservation and/or treatment. Such outline shall identify each element of interest and relate the potential impact of the proposed project to it. Remedial courses of action shall be identified along with an outline with specific safeguards to protect such resources during construction, as required in Article XVIII, Historic District Site Plan Review.
(5) 
If any clearance or demolition of an historic site, landmark or building is proposed, the request for such action shall be clearly set forth at the outset of the review process, as required in Article XVIII, Historic District Site Plan Review.

§ 203-160 Scenic corridors and vistas.

Hamilton Township is a distinctive combination of rural, forest and growth area environments that necessitate the recognition and control of man-made or natural visual environments. Accordingly, the applicant shall set forth in graphic and narrative form the following:
A. 
An analysis of the scenic corridors and vistas on the site.
B. 
The location of all buildings, structures, paved areas, signs, etc., in relation to such areas via renderings, models, cross sections, etc.
C. 
Treatment of all views of waterfront areas where the site has a view of or can be viewed from such scenic resources.
D. 
The impact, or lack thereof, taking into account the proposed project and considering also its night lighting impact on scenic corridors and vistas.

§ 203-161 Demographic and social analysis.

A. 
The applicant shall prepare a demographic and social analysis of conditions generated by the proposed project based on the most recent census data and the marketing analysis required in § 203-168 of this article or other information available from the township, Atlantic County or State of New Jersey.
B. 
At a minimum:
(1) 
This information shall include a demographic profile of the project comparative to the existing community, as well as the projected community population.
(2) 
Demographic projections shall be based upon estimated project build-out.
(3) 
Such demographic information shall, at a minimum, be categorized by age, sex, average annual income, occupation (United States census classification).
(4) 
The emphasis of the sociological information is to provide a comparative analysis between the existing sociological conditions and values and any subsequent impact upon these existing conditions. The intent herein is to identify, as closely as possible, such sociological impacts so that they may be appropriately addressed and reconciled.

§ 203-162 Air quality.

A. 
The existing air quality of the site and its surrounding region shall be evaluated and described, using existing monitoring data collected by and available from state, county or other sources.
B. 
The applicant shall, at a minimum, carry out the following analysis:
(1) 
Inventory of existing ambient air quality.
(a) 
Carbon monoxide.
[1] 
Quantification of existing ambient carbon monoxide concentrations on the proposed site, at major points of direct access to proposed use and at affected intersections designated as defined in the transportation analysis report.
[2] 
A definition of existing ambient carbon monoxide concentrations shall be accomplished through testing by recognized testing laboratories or consultants. Specific monitoring methodology must be approved by the Planning Board or its designated representative.
[3] 
One-hour and eight-hour carbon monoxide concentrations shall be presented for each monitoring location and shall include weekday data between 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. Comparison of existing levels shall be made to the most stringent applicable state or federal regulation. These regulations include but are not limited to the New Jersey Air Pollution Control Act, (N.J.S.A. 26:2C-1 et seq.) and the Federal Clean Air Act of 1970, amended 1977.
(b) 
Other air pollutants. Should it be deemed necessary based upon existing and proposed uses, the Planning Board will require on-site monitoring of other deleterious air pollutants. These pollutants include but are not limited to:
Hydrocarbons
Nitrogen oxides
Photochemical oxidants
Sulfur oxides
Suspended particulate matter
(2) 
Ambient air quality impacts of proposal.
(a) 
Projections. Projections of carbon monoxide levels which will result from the proposal must be provided. Additional projections for other specified pollutants must also be provided if so requested by the Planning Board or its representative.
(b) 
Prediction of future ambient carbon monoxide levels should be based upon proven methodology. State-of-the-art air-quality monitoring guidelines must be employed. Available modeling procedures include the following:
[1] 
Guidelines for air quality maintenance, Planning and Analysis, Volume 9 (Revised): Evaluating Indirect Sources, United States Environmental Protection Agency, EPA-45 0/4-78-001 (OAQPA No. 1.2-02R).
[2] 
Caline Three.
[3] 
Department of Housing and Urban Development models.
(c) 
Compliance. The applicant must indicate the summation of background of existing carbon monoxide concentrations and projected newly generated emissions. Comparison of the result shall be made to the most stringent applicable state or federal regulation.
(3) 
At a minimum, air quality analysis shall be required for the following prevailing conditions, in addition to other requirements contained herein:
(a) 
Any residential development which proposes to have more than 20 dwelling units.
(b) 
Any residential use within 200 feet of any commercial, industrial or light industrial use.
(c) 
Any residential use which proposes to take direct access to any collector or arterial road.
(d) 
Any commercial, industrial, light industrial or manufacturing use.
(4) 
Applications for the following developments shall ensure that all state ambient air quality standards in N.J.A.C. 7:27 et seq. for carbon monoxide shall not be exceeded at places of maximum concentration and at sensitive receptors. Adherence to the standards of this section shall be determined by means of an air quality simulation model approved by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to N.J.A.C. 7:27-18.3.
[Amended 2-20-1990 by Ord. No. 1019-90; 7-7-1997 by Ord. No. 1261-97; 8-4-1997 by Ord. No. 1280-97]
(a) 
Residential development of 50 or more units and any other development involving more than 100 parking spaces located in the R-22, R-9, GA-L, GA-M, GA-I, HC, DC, GC, VC, IBP or PVD Zones; and
[Amended 12-5-2006 by Ord. No. 1579-2006; 11-19-2007 by Ord. No. 1613-2007]
(b) 
Residential development of 100 or more units and any other development involving more than 300 parking spaces located in any other Pinelands Area zone.

§ 203-163 Noise quality inventory analysis.

A. 
The quantification of noise quality within the habitable environments is an issue of concern, since the township has such a diverse system of interrelated land uses with an equally diverse potential of generating noise impact. Accordingly, the applicant, at a minimum, shall carry out the following analysis:
B. 
Noise quality inventory; impact.
(1) 
Inventory of existing noise levels.
(a) 
Qualification of existing ambient sound levels on the proposed site to major points of direct access to the proposed use and at affected intersections.
(b) 
The applicant shall monitor existing continuous airborne sound levels with the use of a sound-level meter that satisfies the requirements of the American National Standard Specification for Type II Sound Level Meters S1.3-1971. Measurements should utilize the A-frequency weighting and be expressed in dBA's.
(c) 
The maximum, minimum and average sound levels must be provided for each monitoring location and period.
(d) 
Continuous (twenty-four-hour) measurement of Ldn (day-night levels) as specified in Federal Register, July 12, 1979, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Environmental Criteria and Standard, at 24 CFR, Part 51, is required for residential developments having more than 250 units. Sound-level meters utilized to measure Ldn must satisfy the requirements of the American National Standard Specification for Type I Sound Level Meters S1.4-1971, plus fast-time averaging and A-frequency weighting.
(2) 
Noise quality impacts of proposal.
(a) 
Projections.
[1] 
Projections of noise impacts and exposure due to concentration and operation of the proposal must be provided.
[2] 
Prediction of future noise levels should be based upon state-of-the-art modeling methodology. Noise-mitigation detail on any berms or barriers must include a statistical evaluation of effectiveness.
(b) 
Compliance. The applicant must indicate the summation of existing and projected noise contributions. Comparisons of these results shall be made to the most stringent applicable state or federal regulations, including but not limited to:
[1] 
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Chapter 29, Noise Control Regulations, dated January 23, 1974.
[2] 
Department of Housing and Urban Development Site Acceptability Standards as delineated in Federal Register, 24 CFR, Part 1, Subpart B, July 12, 1979.

§ 203-164 Aesthetics plan.

The aesthetics plan is to be considered a design tool utilized by the applicant to communicate in an organized manner the looks of the project as it is perceived to be upon completion. Accordingly, the applicant shall:
A. 
Describe the general design of the proposed facility by providing cross sections of buildings in conjunction with the natural or landscaped environment; elevations; sketches; renderings; and photographs or scale models of any structures or construction associated with the facility.
B. 
Describe building materials, textures and color schemes.
C. 
Provide perspective views of the facility from several on-site and off-site vantage points.
D. 
If the application requests a permit for a facility with a repetition of several building designs, submit an aesthetics plan for one each of the typical building design.

§ 203-165 Fiscal impact and market analysis.

A. 
Fiscal impact analysis.
(1) 
The fiscal impact requirement set forth herein has been established to enable the community, as well as the applicant, to fully comprehend the complete spectrum of direct and, to the extent possible, indirect ramifications of projects within the community.
(2) 
At a minimum, the following requirements shall be submitted:
(a) 
At the outset, each fiscal impact analysis must set forth:
[1] 
A site location map accompanied by tax block and lot numbers.
[2] 
The exact number of dwelling units by type (apartments, townhouses, single-family dwellings) or nonresidential square footage, also by type of use (office, industrial, shopping center, recreational, commercial, hotel) that is utilized as the subject of the analysis; the number of units for sale versus the number of units to rent, as well as ownership of nonresidential buildings.
[3] 
The population generated by the project by demographic characteristics.
[4] 
The name and qualifications of the firm or person(s) preparing said fiscal impact shall be set forth as part of the study.
[5] 
Each fiscal impact analysis must be accompanied by a completed copy of the Hamilton Township Project Matrix.
(b) 
Any residential project consisting of more than 100 dwelling units shall be required to utilize the case-study method of forecasting as described in the book Fiscal Impact Analysis by Robert W. Burchell and David Listokin or any other text recommended by the community at the time the application is received.
(c) 
For residential projects under 100 units, the applicant may use the per capita multiplier, service standard, comparable city or employment anticipation methods as reflected in Fiscal Impact Analysis cited in Subsection A(2)(b) of this section.
(d) 
Nonresidential projects shall utilize standard analytical techniques acceptable for the slated purpose. Such techniques shall be approved by the township's consultants prior to compilation.
(e) 
In all cases, applicants must clearly define, by categories, the anticipated costs for off-tract improvements and who will bear the costs, at what times, as compared with the construction schedule of the project.
B. 
Market analysis.
(1) 
The following information is required for residential and nonresidential projects to enable the community to plan ahead with respect to anticipated commitments that must be made by the public sector to support forthcoming projects.
(2) 
At a minimum, the following requirements shall be met:
(a) 
The name and qualifications of the firm or person(s) preparing said market analysis shall be set forth as part of the study.
(b) 
The market analysis for residential projects shall evaluate the absorption capacity by the following categories:
[1] 
Project phase.
[2] 
Unit types (i.e., townhouses, garden apartments, single-family detached, etc.).
[3] 
Sales versus rental units.
[4] 
Other categories.
(c) 
At a minimum, the market analysis for nonresidential projects (i.e., commercial, industrial, etc.) shall provide:
[1] 
Absorption capacity by project phase, based upon the following categories:
[a] 
Retail.
[b] 
Office.
[c] 
Service.
[d] 
Industrial: warehousing and manufacturing.
[e] 
Other categories.
[2] 
The competitive study shall be identified and compared to the absorption capacity by comparable categories listed in Subsection B(2)(b).
(d) 
At a minimum, the market area to be evaluated shall include Atlantic County and Hamilton Township as separate entities.
C. 
Annual update. For each project required to submit a fiscal impact analysis and/or a market analysis, the applicant shall be required to submit, at a minimum, an annual update, based upon the community's fiscal calendar, indicating:
(1) 
The number of units constructed since the last reporting period.
(2) 
The type of units constructed by type (i.e., townhouses, garden apartments, single-family detached, etc.).
(3) 
Whether such units were sales or rentals.
(4) 
Estimated population characteristics of units constructed and occupied (i.e., number of persons by age and sex).
(5) 
The projected number of units by type and bedrooms to be constructed during the next twelve-month period.
D. 
Each fiscal impact and market analysis shall include an executive summary identifying all salient issues.

§ 203-166 Construction and operational plan.

A. 
The applicant shall describe and estimate the construction cost, schedule and methods of the facility, including the following items:
(1) 
Construction timetable, by major components and total time.
(2) 
Anticipated site preparation and on-site construction.
(3) 
Construction techniques, including industrialized building systems, for final plan approval.
(4) 
Means of construction equipment access to the site.
B. 
The applicant shall describe, in general, what the completed facility will do and how it will operate, including but not limited to the following items, where appropriate:
(1) 
Ownership and maintenance of the facility, including mechanisms for common ownership in planned unit developments.
(2) 
Goods and services to be produced and delivered, including needs satisfied, clients to be served and normal hours of operation.
(3) 
The estimated economic value of added goods and services to be produced.
(4) 
The estimated number and types of jobs to be created, including payroll.
(5) 
The estimated assessed valuation of the facility, addition to property tax base and addition to annual property tax income.
(6) 
A description of industrial processes.
(7) 
The estimated resident population, working population and visitor population and their estimated demands for public services.

§ 203-167 Landscaping and lighting plan.

A. 
Landscape plan.
(1) 
A detailed landscaping analysis and plan shall be provided indicating the complete scope of existing and proposed landscaping to be incorporated within the overall project design.
(2) 
At a minimum, the landscaping plan shall include the following:
(a) 
The name of the landscape architect responsible for the plan preparation.
(b) 
A site plan showing the information required in § 203-156 of this article, including all existing plant resources available at the site by species, estimated size and location. Such site plan shall include all specimen trees.
(c) 
A landscaping plan shall indicate, at a minimum, a matrix identifying:
[1] 
The common and scientific name of the plant material.
[2] 
The size at the time of planting.
[3] 
The quantity.
[4] 
Seasonal foliage characteristics.
[5] 
The plant function (i.e., buffer planting, shade, landscape design, security, screening, defining spaces, parking lot canopies, promote energy conservation, physical barriers, wildlife plantings, decorative ornamental plantings, noise abatement, etc.).
[6] 
The estimated cost per plant at the time of planting, to include the cost of installation.
(d) 
As part of the application for final approval, a maintenance plan for all plant material either existing or proposed shall be prepared and set forth. Such plan, at a minimum, shall stipulate an annual monthly schedule for:
[1] 
Lawn care.
[2] 
Tree care.
[3] 
Shrub care.
[4] 
Ground cover maintenance.
[5] 
Seasonal plantings.
[6] 
Weed disease and pest control.
[7] 
Fertilizing and land preparation.
[8] 
Irrigation systems service.
[9] 
Other services.
[10] 
The name and address of the responsible entity for implementing the maintenance policy.
(e) 
As part of the application for final approval, the manner in which the preservation of plant material during construction shall be implemented shall be set forth indicating:
[1] 
The location of such plant material.
[2] 
Field markings to be utilized for identification.
(f) 
All plant material (trees, shrubs or ground cover) to be preserved on the property shall be protected against damage during construction operations by fencing or armoring. The tree protection shall be placed before any excavation or grading is begun and shall be maintained in repair for the duration of the construction period. It shall be removed when the tree planting work is started. The extent of fencing and armoring details shall be detailed on the landscape plan for general areas of preservation, as well as for specific trees to be left standing.
(g) 
At a minimum, the contractor shall install snow fencing held in place by metal posts along areas of plant materials to be protected.
(h) 
Any damage to existing tree crowns or root systems shall be repaired immediately. Roots exposed and/or damaged during grading operations shall immediately be cut off cleanly inside the exposed or damaged area, cut surfaces painted with approved tree paint and topsoil spread over the exposed root area.
(i) 
If trees designated for preservation are damaged by construction equipment or by any other means, then the applicant shall be responsible for its replacement with plant material approaching as close to the original size as possible. The replacement policy with respect to size-survival criteria will be judged by an independent landscape architect engaged by the Township's Planning Board for the sole purpose of making such determination.
(j) 
Existing trees that are to remain in areas of fill not over 24 inches in depth shall be preserved as follows: Such trees shall be protected by a cylindrical sheath of galvanized metal placed within six inches of the trunk on all sides. Before soil is placed over the root area, a layer of broken stone or coarse gravel shall be set down to within six inches of finished grade. A one-half-inch-thick blanket, with joints lapped not less than six inches, shall be spread over the gravel fill to prevent topsoil from clogging interstices or gravel and thereby preventing air circulation to roots. The remaining six to eight inches shall be filled with topsoil. The area to be treated in this manner shall extend to the outer dripline of the branches. For graphic descriptions, see § 203-128.
B. 
Exterior lighting standards.
[Amended 7-7-1997 by Ord. No. 1261-97]
(1) 
The purpose of this section is to ensure the safe lighting of all areas and to regulate the spillover and glare of light.
(2) 
Plans shall be submitted for approval showing proposed lighting for all projects, including residential, commercial and institutional.
(3) 
Lighting plan shall show illumination for all streets, structure exteriors, walkways, parking facilities and other areas where there is pedestrian and vehicular traffic.
(4) 
Signs which are to be illuminated shall be shown on the plans, indicating types of lights, lamp wattage and control of lighting.
(5) 
The lighting plan shall be comprised of a site plan indicating the location of all luminaries. Each laminar shown shall have isofootcandle curves indicated showing each of the following footcandle values: 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 2.0.
(6) 
Details of the luminaries shall be shown on the plans and shall indicate the following:
(a) 
Type of laminar.
(b) 
Lamp type: incandescent, fluorescent, high pressure sodium, etc.
(c) 
Lamp wattage.
(d) 
Isofootcandle curves as prepared by the manufacturer of the fixture.
(e) 
Light cutoff angles.
(f) 
Where pole is mounted: pole design, height of pole, foundations and supports.
(7) 
Parking facility lighting.
(a) 
Lighting shall conform in all respects to the latest design criteria as described in §§ 203-62 and 203-122B(5) and as published by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America; reference NP20.
(8) 
Walkways and bikeways.
(a) 
Lighting shall conform in all respects to the latest design criteria as described in Sections 203-62 and 203-122B(5) and as published by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America; reference DG5.
(9) 
Roadway lighting.
(a) 
Lighting shall conform in all respects to the latest design criteria as described in § 203-83 and as published by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America; reference RP8.
(10) 
Lighting controls.
(a) 
The method of the operation of all area and sign lighting shall be indicated on the plans.
(b) 
The hours when illumination is to be used shall be indicated.
(c) 
Sign lighting shall be in accord with provisions outlined in § 203-139.
(11) 
Special considerations.
(a) 
Excessive lighting glare, and spillage of lighting shall be avoided and shall be corrected where necessary.
(b) 
Laminar design shall conform to architectural environments where applicable.

§ 203-168 Security analysis and plan.

A. 
Given the anticipated increase in population in Hamilton Township within the growth area corridor, a security analysis and plan is required to reflect the efforts taken at a design stage to maximize security and safety of future inhabitants.
B. 
At a minimum, the applicant shall:
(1) 
Indicate upon the site plan emergency access routes for police, fire and ambulance services.
(2) 
Identify design plans which would facilitate the removal of the sick and/or injured, by stretcher, from within the structure; i.e., the width of hallways and door frames, etc.
(3) 
Identify any call systems which will be used in remote areas of the project to facilitate the summoning of assistance in times of emergency.
(4) 
Identify the unit marking system to be used in multifamily dwellings that will facilitate the identification of individual units in times of emergency.
(5) 
Indicate the architectural techniques used in the design to deter unlawful entry and other forms of crime; i.e., steel door jambs, locking mechanisms, exterior door design, alarm systems, security lighting, landscaping, elimination of dark alcoves, alleyways, etc.
(6) 
Identify the techniques which will be used in the design to control access to the project.
(7) 
Where a project borders a major roadway, i.e., Black Horse Pike, Atlantic City Expressway, etc., then identify the proposed barriers which will limit access to these roadways by children and unauthorized personnel.
(8) 
Where a project incorporates common areas, i.e., community buildings, office lobbies, etc., then identify the proposed security system.
(9) 
Indicate the technique that will be utilized in the design of the grounds and internal areas of apartment units, housing developments and other residential areas that will facilitate natural, visual and auditory monitoring of the activities taking place within them, i.e., the glazing, lighting and positioning of the areas and access paths surrounding and leading to apartment buildings and units and the design of facilities which enables residents to view commonly used areas (paths, entries, play and seating areas) during their normal household activities.
(10) 
Indicate other techniques that create a sense of safety and encourage improved upkeep by the residents, i.e., self-help tools which catalyze the natural impulses of residents to assume their social responsibilities (refer to Defensible Space by Oscar Newman).
(11) 
Indicate the professional responsible for formulating the security plan for the proposed project.