Township of New Hanover, PA
Montgomery County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1800]
When required by this chapter, the applicant shall submit the following impact statements. These impact studies will be reviewed by the Township and must be found to be satisfactory prior to approving the use or zoning change. Any improvements identified by the studies will be required improvements at the time approval is granted.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1801]
The applicant shall submit an analysis which describes and evaluates the consistency of the proposed use or zoning classification with the Comprehensive Plan and the goals stated in the preamble of this chapter. This analysis shall include, but not be limited to, the consistency with the stated goals, the land use plan and map, population and housing projections, sewer facilities, water facilities, the road system and its capacity, other community services and natural resources.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1802]
1. 
The applicant shall submit an analysis which describes and evaluates the compatibility of the proposed use or zoning classification with the existing and prospective land uses. The analysis shall include, but not be limited to the following:
A. 
Plans and maps which illustrate the proposed use and its density/intensity, area of regrading and impervious cover. The plan shall also illustrate surrounding uses (existing, proposed and zoned) on the surrounding properties. The distance from the boundaries of the proposed use or tract of buildings on adjacent tracts of land shall be shown.
B. 
Illustrations, plans or other descriptions of screening or buffering measures proposed to minimize land use incompatibilities generated by the proposed use.
C. 
Statements concerning noise, air pollution and other nuisances listed in Part 21 of this chapter and methods to abate such nuisances.
D. 
Plans showing proposed points of access and egress on the tract and the distance to such points on adjacent tracts. Distances between access points shall meet the requirements of Chapter 22, Subdivision and Land Development.
E. 
Written text interpreting the information and data presented in terms of the aforementioned objectives.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1803]
1. 
The applicant shall submit an analysis which evaluates the ability of the proposed use or zoning classification to meet the natural resource protection standards of §§ 27-210127-2103, 27-2108 and 27-2109 of this chapter.
2. 
The applicant shall provide a stormwater runoff analysis comparing the runoff from the site in its existing, natural state to the runoff from the developed site. The one-hundred-year storm should be used for comparison and hyrdographs for twenty-four-hour, twelve-hour, six-hour and three-hour duration of the storm should be prepared. The runoff analysis should also describe any external runoff that passes through the site and determine the impact of the proposed storm drainage improvements on external runoff for the same storm intensities. A preliminary stormwater management plan shall be submitted.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1804; as amended by Ord. 93-2, 2/8/1993, §§ 72, 73; and by Ord. 98-6, 6/22/1998, § 12]
1. 
The applicant shall submit an analysis which evaluates the traffic impact when the proposed use or development generates 500 or more trips per day. The number of trips per day are determined through the use of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Report (current edition or as amended). The proposed use or development is identified using the columns "Type of Land Use" and "Type of Development." The size of the proposed use or development (number of dwelling units, gross square footage, number of beds, etc.) is multiplied by the appropriate rate listed in the column "Average Trip General Rate" to determine the trips per day.
A. 
Traffic Impact Study. The study will enable the Township to assess the impact of a proposed development on the traffic system. Its purpose is to ensure that proposed developments does not adversely affect the traffic network and to identify any traffic problems associated with access from the site onto the existing roads. The study's purpose is also to delineate solutions to potential problems and to present improvements to be incorporated into the proposed development.
B. 
Traffic Facilities Description. The description shall contain a full documentation of the proposed internal and existing highway system. The report shall describe the external roadway system within the area. Major intersections in the study area shall be identified and sketched. All future highway improvements which are part of proposed roadway improvements which are, in turn, part of proposed surrounding developments shall be noted and included in the calculations.
C. 
Major Intersections. Any intersection where traffic generated by the proposal will have a significant impact on the operation of the intersection. Where doubt exists, the transportation engineer shall seek guidance from the Planning Commission prior to the submission of the traffic impact study.
D. 
Study Area. This area will extend approximately 1/2 mile along the adjacent roadway in both directions from all access points or to a major intersection along these roadways. Where doubt exists, the transportation engineer shall seek guidance from the Planning Commission prior to the submission of the traffic impact study.
E. 
Existing Traffic Conditions.
(1) 
Existing traffic conditions shall be measured and documented for all roadways and intersections in the study area. Existing traffic volumes for average daily traffic, peak highway hour(s) traffic and peak development-generated hour(s) traffic shall be recorded. Manual traffic counts at major intersections in the study area shall be conducted, encompassing the peak highway and development-generated hour(s), and documentation shall be included in the report. A volume-capacity and delay analysis based upon existing volumes shall be performed during the peak highway hour(s) and the peak development-generated hour(s) for all roadways and major intersections in the study area. Levels of service shall be determined for each location.
(2) 
This analysis will determine the adequacy of the existing roadway system to serve the current traffic demand. Roadways and/or intersections experiencing levels of Service D, E or F, as described in Highway Capacity Manual, Special Report 209, Transportation Research Board, 1985, shall be noted as congested locations.
F. 
Traffic Impact. Calculation of vehicular trips to result from the proposal shall be completed for the average daily peak highway hour(s). Vehicular trip generation rates to be used for this calculation shall be obtained from Trip Generation Reports, Institute of Transportation Engineers, as hereinafter amended or revised. These development-generated traffic volumes shall be provided for the inbound and outbound traffic movements. These generated volumes shall be distributed to the area and assigned to the existing roadways and intersections throughout the area. All turning movements shall be calculated. Documentation of all assumptions used in the distribution and assignment phase shall be provided. Traffic volumes shall be assigned to individual access points. Any characteristics of the site that will cause particular trip generation problems shall be noted.
G. 
Analysis of Traffic Impact. The total future traffic demand shall be calculated. This demand shall consist of the combination of the existing traffic expanded to the completion year, which is estimated to be 5% per year, the proposed use or development generated traffic, and the traffic generated by other proposed developments in the study area. A second volume/capacity and delay analysis shall be conducted using the total future demand and the future roadway capacity. If staging of the proposed development is anticipated, calculation for each stage of completion shall be made. This analysis shall be performed during the peak highway hour(s) and peak development-generated hour(s) for all roadways and major intersection in the study area. Volume/capacity and delay calculations shall be completed for all major intersections. The procedures described in the Highway Capacity Manual, Special Report 209, Highway Resource Board, 1985, as outlined in the PennDOT Design Manual, Volume 2, shall be followed.
H. 
Conclusions and Recommendations. Levels of service for all roadways and intersections shall be listed. All roadways and/or intersections showing a level of service D, E or F and volume/capacity ratios equal to or greater than 1:0 shall be considered deficient and specific recommendations for the elimination of these problems shall be listed. This listing of recommended improvements shall include, but not be limited to, the following elements: internal circulation design, site access location and design, external roadway and intersection design and improvements, traffic signal installation and operation (including timing), and transit design improvements. All physical roadway improvements shall be shown in sketches. Signal timing should be evaluated for any intersection with a level of service D, E or F, but a volume capacity ratio of less than 1:0. Warrants for signalization shall be examined for unsignalized intersections with levels of service E or F.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1805]
1. 
The applicant shall submit an analysis which evaluates the consistency between the proposed use or zoning classification and the sewage facilities guidelines and service areas included in the Township's sewage facilities plan.
2. 
A full description of how sewer service will be provided to the proposed use including descriptions of new, system wide improvements that will be required to service the use and the estimated costs of providing such improvements shall be provided.
3. 
Descriptions of the impact of servicing the proposed land development on the capacity treatment facilities, the capacities of major collector pipes and pumping stations, increased maintenance needed and customer service rates shall be provided.
4. 
The applicant must establish that public sewage service and plant capacity is adequate for effluent to be generated by the proposed development, and the maximum use permitted under the zoning classification, as well as the potential development permitted in areas currently designated for sewer service.
[Ord. 3/29/1990A, § 1806; as amended by Ord. 93-2, 2/8/1993, §§ 74, 75; by Ord. 97-7, 10/13/1997, § 27-1907; and by Ord. 17-03, 3/27/2017]
1. 
The applicant shall submit a water impact study when the proposed use will exceed 10,000 or more gallons of water per day.
2. 
A water impact study will enable the Township to evaluate the impact of the proposed development on the ground water supply and on existing wells. The purpose of the study will be to determine if there is an adequate supply of water for the proposed use and to estimate the impact of the new use on existing wells in the vicinity. The Township Engineer shall be involved in the impact study as the Township feels is appropriate and necessary. A water system which does not provide an adequate supply of water for the proposed use, considering both quantity and quality, or does not provide for adequate ground water recharge considering the water withdrawn by the proposed use, or adversely affects existing wells in the vicinity of the proposed development shall not be approved by the Township. The adequacy of the water supply for residential development shall be based upon the assumptions of flows of 275 gallons per day per equivalent dwelling unit (EDU).
A. 
A water impact study shall be signed by the person(s) preparing the study and shall include the following information:
(1) 
Calculations of the projected water needs using the criterion set forth in the following references:
(a) 
Public Water Supply Manual, Bureau of Water Quality Management, Publication No. 15, by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
(b) 
Guide for Determination of Required Fire Flow, by the Insurance Services Office (ISO), as modified.
(c) 
American Water Works Association Standards and Manual by the American Water Works Association, Denver, Colorado.
(2) 
A geologic map of the area with a radius of at least one mile from the site.
(3) 
The location of all existing and proposed wells within 1,000 feet of the site, with a notation of the capacity of all high yield wells.
(4) 
The location of all existing on-lot sewage disposal systems within 1,000 feet of the site.
(5) 
The location of all streams within 1,000 feet of the site, and all known point sources of pollution.
(6) 
The location of all known faults and lineations within 1,000 feet of the site.
(7) 
Based on the geologic formation(s) underlying the site, the long-term safe yield shall be determined.
(8) 
A determination of the effects of the proposed water supply system on the quantity and quality of water in nearby wells, streams and the ground water table.
(9) 
A statement of the qualifications of the person(s) preparing the study.
B. 
The following procedures shall apply:
(1) 
At least one test well shall be constructed.
(a) 
During construction, the well driller shall keep an accurate record of the elevation to which the water level stabilizes as each aquifer is encountered and the top of each stratum penetrated.
(b) 
Samples of geologic material shall be taken from each 20 feet of drilling and at every change in formation. Each sample shall be placed in a nonbreakable container. The containers, in a sturdy box, shall be made available to the Township. Upon completion of a pump house, they shall be stored in the pump house.
(2) 
At least two monitoring wells per test well shall be constructed to monitor the impact of the test well. Monitoring wells at least 200 feet apart shall be a minimum distance of 100 feet and a maximum distance of 200 feet from the test well.
(3) 
Existing wells, within a radius as determined by the chart below, shall be shown on a plan.
Quantity of Cumulative Proposed Withdrawal
Radius from the Proposed Withdrawal to be Considered
10,000 to 50,000 GPD
0.5 miles
50,000 to 100,000 GPD
0.75 miles
In excess of 100,000 GPD
1.00 miles
(a) 
All property owners with an identified well within the study area shall be notified in writing that a well test will be conducted, the date of the test, the reason for the test and what it will consist of.
(b) 
In order to determine the impact of the test well on existing wells a representative sample, evenly, distributed throughout the area, of existing wells shall be monitored. The number and location of wells to be monitored shall be approved by the Township.
(4) 
A yield test of 72 hours duration shall be performed on the test well at a rate not less than 125% of that calculated for projected water needs, except for wells that are located in Brunswick formations which shall be tested at not less than 200% of the projected water needs. Well yields in Brunswick formations have a tendency to decrease from the original yield after the wells have been in production for several years.
(a) 
Prior to pumping, the static water level shall be recorded in all wells.
(b) 
The test well shall be pumped at the test flow rate until the water level has stabilized. When the water level has stabilized, the seventy-two-hour test period may begin. A failing pumping level at discharge rates at or below the required test flow rate shall not be considered acceptable for purposes of yield testing.
(c) 
Test pumping equipment shall be capable of operating at a flow range of between 50% and 150% of the test flow rate.
(d) 
A means of accurately measuring the flow of water shall be provided subject to approval by the Township.
(e) 
Piping shall be installed as required to direct pumpage to a discharge point suitable to the Township.
(f) 
The method of determining the depth of the water surface at all wells shall be subject to approval by the Township.
(5) 
Test pumping shall be continuous for the duration of the test period. An interruption will require extension of the test period subject to approval by the Township.
(6) 
During the test period the pump rate and corresponding depth to the water surface in the test well, monitoring wells and existing wells shall be logged at intervals not exceeding one hour.
(7) 
Upon completion of yield testing, the depth to the water surface in the test and monitor wells shall be recorded at the following minimum time intervals:
Interval Test Well
Not Exceeding Monitor Wells
Minimum Time Period From Pumping Shutdown
1 minute
5 minutes
from 0 minute to 15 minutes
5 minutes
5 minutes
from 15 minutes to 2 hours
1 hour
1 hour
from 2 hours to 8 hours
24 hours
24 hours
from 0 hour to 7 days
1 month
1 month
monthly until the wells have been integrated into the public water system
(8) 
Records shall be compiled in typewritten form to include the following information:
(a) 
Name of driller and personnel conducting test.
(b) 
Description of test well to include horizontal and vertical dimensions and casing installed. Diameter and depth of the casing shall be provided.
(c) 
List of formation samples.
(d) 
Static water level immediately prior to yield testing.
(e) 
Log of depth to water surface during test pumping and recovery period at the test well showing corresponding pump discharge rate in gallons per minute and time readings taken.
(f) 
Log of depth to water surface at existing and monitoring wells during test pumping period showing time readings taken.
(9) 
A report shall accompany the test well data which analyzes and interprets all of the data as to the impacts of the ground water supply and existing wells. Conclusions shall be drawn from the analysis. The credentials of the individual(s) preparing the report shall be included.
(10) 
The submission to the Township shall include any and all applications, reports or supplemental information submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and/or the Delaware River Basin Commission.
3. 
The applicant shall provide a description of the impact of servicing the proposed use on the water system's surplus capacity and water pressure throughout the system. An analysis of maintenance needs and consumer service rates shall be provided. A full description of the manner in which water service will be provided to the proposed use including descriptions of new, system wide improvements that will be required to service the use and the estimated costs of providing such improvements.