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Township of Grosse Ile, MI
Wayne County
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Adopted by the Township Board of the Township of Grosse Ile 8-11-1980 by Ord. No. 137 as Ch. 20 of the Grosse Ile Township Code; amended in its entirety 6-26-2006 by Ord. No. 06-04. Subsequent amendments noted where applicable.]
GENERAL REFERENCES
Building construction — See Ch. 40.
Condominium projects — See Ch. 71.
Grading — See Ch. 124.
Public works — See Ch. 197.
Subdivision control — See Ch. 238.
Wetlands and drainageways — See Ch. 275.
Woodland and tree protection — See Ch. 282.
Zoning — See Ch. 285.
098a Env Assess Review Process
A. 
The Township Board finds that, as an island community, Grosse Ile Township possesses sensitive natural features that are important to the community and the ecosystem of the Detroit River and that development can have significant impacts to many of these unique, and important natural resources.
B. 
This chapter is intended to provide for the comprehensive and systematic protection of natural resources and the environment of Grosse Ile Township. It is also the intent of this chapter to provide for the preservation and management of significant natural features through:
(1) 
Providing for Township review and approval of developments that may have a significant impact on natural features, adjacent land uses and the character of the community.
(2) 
Assisting petitioners, reviewers, decisionmakers and the general public in understanding how natural features may be identified, evaluated, protected, managed and mitigated.
(3) 
Providing a mechanism for identification and protection of natural resources that contain elements of natural beauty, animal habitat and geological, hydrological, ecological and historical characteristics significant to the citizens of the Township.
(4) 
Coordinating the environmental protection measures required under various ordinances, including the Protection of Wetlands and Drainageways,[1] the Woodland Ordinance,[2] Grading Ordinance[3] and Stormwater Management Ordinance.
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 275, Wetlands and Drainageways.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 282, Woodland and Tree Protection.
[3]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 124, Grading.
(5) 
Coordinating and supporting the enforcement of applicable federal, state, and county ordinances and statutes, including, but not limited to:
(a) 
Michigan Environmental Protection Act (Act 347, Public Acts of Michigan of 1972, as amended), which imposes a duty on government agencies and private individuals and organizations to prevent or minimize degradation of the environment which is likely to be caused by their activities;
(b) 
Goemaere Anderson Wetland Protection Act (Act 203, Public Acts of Michigan of 1979, as amended);
(c) 
The Federal Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. § 1251);
(d) 
Inland Lakes and Streams Act (Act 346, Public Acts of Michigan of 1972, as amended);
(e) 
Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control Act (Act 347, Public Acts of Michigan of 1972, as amended);
(f) 
Flood Plain Control Act (Act 167 of the Public Acts of Michigan of 1968);
(g) 
Water Resource Commission Act (Act 245 of the Public Acts of Michigan of 1929), as amended); and
(h) 
Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act (Act 451 of the Public Acts of Michigan of 1994).
C. 
This chapter includes requirements for an environmental assessment, which is intended to accompany a site plan to specifically address the anticipated impact of a proposed use on the natural features, economic climate, social environment, public infrastructure and public services in the Township. The assessment is intended to allow reasonable use of property while ensuring the long-term community benefits associated with preserving environmentally sensitive lands and aesthetic resources.
Unless the context otherwise requires, the definitions in this section shall apply to and govern the construction of this chapter:
ACTIVITY
Any use, operation, development or action involving a change in, on or to uplands or bottomlands caused by any person, including, but not limited to, constructing, operating or maintaining any use or development; erecting buildings or other structures; depositing or removing material; dredging; ditching; land balancing; draining or diverting water; pumping or discharge of surface water; grading; paving; vegetative clearing or excavation, mining or drilling operations.
DEVELOPMENT
Any man-made change to improved or unimproved real estate, including, but not limited to, buildings or other structures, dredging, filling, grading, paving, bridges, alteration to waterways, excavation or drilling operations.
ENVIRONMENT
The physical and social conditions which exist within the area and within the Township of Grosse Ile which will be affected by a proposed project, including natural features, as defined (natural environment), land uses, buildings, improvements and infrastructure, including utilities, roads and public facilities (built environment), social and economic conditions (socio-economic environment) and cultural/historic resources.
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT
A detailed statement or study setting forth the environmental analysis and the results thereof required by this chapter. It shall also include any comments on an environmental assessment which are obtained or received or required to be obtained pursuant to this chapter. An environmental assessment is an informational document or study which, when its preparation is required by this chapter, shall be finished and considered by the public agency prior to its approval or disapproval of a project. The purpose of an environmental assessment is to provide the public agency with detailed information about the significant effects which a proposed project may or is likely to have on the environment; to list ways or recommendations by which any adverse effects of such a project might be minimized; to suggest or recommend alternatives to such projects; and to insure that if the project is approved, it will be constructed, completed or developed in a manner consistent with the report and with the environmental recommendations, if any, contained therein.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
Any alteration of the existing conditions of the environment, or the creation of a new set of environmental conditions, adverse or beneficial, caused or induced in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, by a proposed project.
FLORISTIC QUALITY ASSESSMENT
An assessment that includes a comprehensive list of plant species that occur on a site, based upon sampling, an identification of the estimated probability that each plant species is likely to occur in a pre-settlement landscape (coefficient of conservatism) and an establishment of a floristic quality index based upon the aggregate of all plant species on the site. Such assessment shall be prepared based upon standards and guidelines adopted by the Township or the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
NATURAL FEATURES
Any one or more of the following: soils, topography, geology, vegetation, woodlands, landmark tree, fish and wildlife habitat, floodplain, watercourse, rivers, streams, creeks, ponds, wetland, groundwater, watersheds, aesthetic resources, and microclimate.
PERSON
Includes any person, firm, association, organization, partnership, business, trust, corporation or company.
PLANNING COMMISSION
The Gross Ile Township Planning Commission.
PROJECT
Any use, operation, development or action involving a change in, on or to uplands or bottomlands caused by any person, including, but not limited to, constructing, operating or maintaining any use or development; erecting buildings or other structures; depositing or removing material; dredging; ditching; land balancing; draining or diverting water; pumping or discharge of surface water; grading; paving; vegetative clearing or excavation, mining or drilling operations.
PUBLIC AGENCY
The Township of Grosse Ile and its respective boards and commissions, Wayne County, State of Michigan, United States Federal Government.
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
An adverse impact on the environment that is greater than the impact of other similar uses within the Township due to the increased intensity of the proposed development or the presence of sensitive or valuable environmental features on the site that will be adversely impacted by development.
STREAMS
As defined in the Protection of Wetlands and Drainageways Ordinance.[1]
TOWNSHIP BOARD
The Grosse Ile Township Board.
WATERCOURSE
As defined in the Protection of Wetlands and Drainageways Ordinance.
WETLAND
As defined in the Protection of Wetlands and Drainageways Ordinance.
WOODLAND
As defined in the Woodland Protection Ordinance.[2]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 275, Wetlands and Drainageways.
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 282, Woodland and Tree Protection.
A. 
Approval of environmental assessment required. All applications to Grosse Ile Township for the following approvals shall be accompanied by an environmental assessment and an environmental assessment checklist. Such study and checklist shall be prepared, reviewed and approved meeting the requirements of this chapter.
(1) 
Site plan approval from the Planning Commission under the Zoning Ordinance[1] for any new use, or building or major expansion to an existing non-single-family residential use (e.g., multiple-family residential, commercial or industrial) where the expansion has the potential to impact natural areas or natural features;
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 285, Zoning.
(2) 
Special land use approval from the Township Board under the Zoning Ordinance for the establishment of any new special land use or major expansion to an existing special land use where the expansion has the potential to impact natural areas or natural features;
(3) 
Rezoning approval from the Township Board under the Zoning Ordinance;
(4) 
Tentative preliminary plat approval from the Township Board under the Subdivision Control Ordinance;[2]
[2]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 238, Subdivision Control.
(5) 
Preliminary condominium approval from the Township Board under the Condominium Projects Ordinance;[3]
[3]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 71, Condominium Projects.
(6) 
Wetland permit approval from the Planning Commission under the Wetlands and Drainageways Protection Ordinance;[4] and
[4]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 275, Wetlands and Drainageways.
(7) 
Any crossing, construction or fill within a navigable waterway that will impact navigation or aquatic habitat.
B. 
Exemptions: The following categories of actions, which do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the environment and, therefore, do not require the submission of an environmental assessment or checklist for approval under this chapter:
(1) 
Building permits for construction of a new single-family and customary accessory structures or expansion to a single-family residential dwelling;
(2) 
Site plan approval by the Planning Commission under the Zoning Ordinance for minor expansions to existing non-single-family residential uses (e.g., multiple-family residential, commercial or industrial), including accessory structures, where the use is permitted under the Zoning Ordinance and the expansion is within an area of the site that has been previously disturbed and does not contain natural features;
(3) 
Amended special land use approval from the Township Board under the Zoning Ordinance for expansions or changes to existing special land uses where the expansion is within an area of the site that has been previously disturbed and does not contain natural features;
(4) 
Building permits for interior construction or exterior renovation of any building that is exempt from the site plan requirements of the Zoning Ordinance;
(5) 
Reuse of an existing building for a use permitted in the zoning district;
(6) 
Waterfront accessory structures that are in compliance with the Zoning Ordinance and will not impact navigation or aquatic habitat;
(7) 
Ministerial projects proposed to be carried out by the Township or other governmental agency;
(8) 
Projects that the Planning Commission determines at the time of a preapplication hearing will not to have a significant effect on the environment due to the low-impact nature of the proposal and the lack of natural features on the site; and
(9) 
Emergency repairs to public service facilities necessary to maintain service.
The following process shall be followed for the review and approval of an environmental assessment. The process shall run concurrently with the site plan, subdivision plat, rezoning or other applicable review process.
A. 
Natural features determination. The petitioner contemplating a project requiring Township review is responsible for determining whether natural features exist on the site. This determination can be made by outside consultants retained by the petitioner. Township staff will confirm these determinations during the review process.
B. 
Plan and environmental assessment submission. The Zoning Ordinance, Condominium Projects Ordinance and Subdivision Control Ordinance specify what information must be shown on plans submitted for Township review. The applicant shall submit the environmental assessment and checklist along with any site plan, subdivision tentative preliminary plat, or rezoning application and required fees to the Community Development Department.
C. 
Township staff review/analysis of alternative designs. Community Development Department staff will coordinate the proposal's review by various Township departments and consultants to provide written review and recommendation to the Planning Commission.
D. 
Planning Commission review and findings. Once information and plans submitted to the Township are complete, the formal public review process begins with the Planning Commission. Exact procedures for reviews before the Township Planning Commission and the Township Board are outlined in the Zoning Ordinance, Condominium Projects Ordinance and Subdivision Control Ordinance. The Planning Commission shall review the environmental assessment to determine that the data and analysis of the environmental assessment are complete. Once complete, the Planning Commission shall make one of the two following findings based upon the criteria of § 98-5:
(1) 
A finding that the proposed project is not a project which may or is likely to have a significant impact on the environment.
(2) 
A finding that the proposed project may or is likely to have a significant impact on the environment.
E. 
Planning Commission approval for projects with no significant impact. Upon a finding by the Planning Commission that a proposed project is not a project which may or is likely to have a significant impact on the environment or any impacts can be fully mitigated, such finding shall be included in an environmental assessment statement and the environmental assessment shall be approved or denied by the Planning Commission based upon the review criteria of § 98-6. The Planning Commission may thereafter proceed to either approve or disapprove the project; provided, however, that any approval of the proposed project shall take into consideration the information, recommendations and mitigation measures contained within the environmental assessment.
F. 
Township Board review and approval required for a significant impact. Upon a finding by the Planning Commission that the proposed project may or is likely to have a significant impact on the environment, the Planning Commission shall, prior to approval or disapproval of the project, forward the environmental assessment to the Township Board for approval along with recommended mitigation measures to minimize the environmental impact of the project. Where significant environmental impacts will result from the proposed project, then the environmental assessment shall be approved or denied by the Township Board based upon the review criteria of § 98-6 and a finding that the mitigation measures proposed will minimize the level of impact to the maximum extent practical.
G. 
Final approvals, permits and inspections. Following approval of the environmental assessment and other approvals required under applicable ordinances, permits shall be obtained from the Community Development Department. All natural feature protection measures specified in the approved plans must be installed and maintained on the site throughout construction. Inspections shall be conducted to ensure sedimentation and erosion controls and protective barrier fencing are in place and maintained, limits of construction and barrier fencing are being observed, pavements and streets are clean of soils, debris is properly contained on the site, and site work is proceeding according to plan.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: A chart depicting the environmental assessment review process is included at the end of this chapter.
The criteria established under § 98-4 shall require a finding of "significant impact on the environment" if any of the following conditions exist:
A. 
A proposed project will have an adverse impact on the environment that is greater than the impact of other similar uses within the Township due to the increased intensity of the proposed development or the presence of sensitive or valuable environmental features on the site that will be adversely impacted by development.
B. 
A proposed project has the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, curtail the range of the environment, or the potential to achieve short-term, to the disadvantage of long-term, environmental goals.
C. 
The possible effects of a project are individually limited but cumulatively considerable, including consideration of any secondary land use changes that may result from the proposed action.
D. 
The environmental effects of a project will cause substantial adverse effects on human beings, either directly or indirectly.
In determining whether the proposed disturbance or removal of natural features is limited to the minimum necessary to allow a reasonable use of the land, the approving body shall apply the following criteria:
A. 
The environmental assessment is complete and contains all of the information and analysis required by § 98-7.
B. 
The environmental impact of other practical alternative development plans under § 98-8.
C. 
The importance and overall value of a natural feature, both on the site and on a Township-wide basis. In general, the importance of a natural feature increases with its rarity, size, age and condition.
D. 
The existence of overlapping natural features in one area. Overlapping natural features increase the importance and overall value for preservation of the area.
E. 
The existence of edges between two habitats or natural features. The edges between two natural feature types, such as the area between an upland and a wetland or the edge between a woodland and a prairie play an important role, particularly for animal life.
F. 
The existence of natural greenway linkages. Natural linkages across a site that connect habitat areas, follow a riparian corridor or connect with natural features on adjacent sites should be preserved.
G. 
The impact of the proposed disturbance on the integrity of ecological systems or the continuity between natural features. Wherever possible, ecological systems and continuity between natural features should be preserved.
H. 
The impact on public services, facilities, roads, utilities, and surrounding land and degree to which such impact shall be mitigated.
I. 
Compliance with the protection standards of § 98-10.
J. 
The adequacy of the mitigation plan meeting the requirements of § 98-9.
K. 
Applicant obtaining all federal, state and county permits.
The environmental assessment required under this chapter shall accompany a development application and specifically address the anticipated impact of a proposed project on the natural features, cultural resources, public infrastructure and public services in the Township. The environmental impact study checklist shall also be completed and submitted with the assessment. The following information shall be provided in the environmental assessment. The level of detail will vary based upon the scope and nature of the proposed project and the presence of environmental features on the site. It is the intent of this section that the environmental assessment focuses analysis on natural features and environmental impacts that are pertinent to the site and the proposed activity, and not generate large volumes of extraneous analysis of environmental features that are not present or are not to be impacted.
A. 
Name(s) and address(es) of person(s) responsible for preparation of the impact assessment and a brief statement of their qualifications shall be provided. The report shall be prepared by a professional qualified in the areas of ecology, botany, wildlife biology, geology, or other relevant discipline acceptable to the Planning Commission.
B. 
A description of the proposed project, activity or development shall be provided.
C. 
Map(s) and a written description/analysis of the project site shall be provided, including all existing structures, man-made facilities, and natural features. An aerial photograph or drawing may be used to delineate these areas.
D. 
A site inventory shall be prepared that identifies the location of existing environmental conditions and contains a written description of their quality, character, and health, including the following:
(1) 
Environmental characteristics of the site prior to development and following development, i.e., topography, soil series and classification, geology, wildlife, woodlands, mature indigenous trees with a six-inch caliper or greater, groundwater, wetlands, drainageways, rivers, streams, creeks, ponds, and surface water quality. Documentation by a qualified wetland specialist shall be required wherever the Township determines that there is a potential regulated wetland. Written material may be accompanied by reduced copies of the Existing Conditions Map(s) or aerial photograph.
(2) 
A floristic quality assessment shall be prepared to evaluate the vegetation found on the site and identify the natural significance of the habitat;
(3) 
Map and description of site location in relationship to the local drainage, including an identification of the drain, stream, river or other tributary to which the site drains;
(4) 
Surrounding zoning, land uses, buildings, and aesthetic character;
(5) 
Public facilities and services, including schools, recreation facilities, police protection, fire protection and emergency services that serve the site; and
(6) 
Public utilities that serve the site, including water, sanitary sewer, storm drainage, gas and electricity.
E. 
The environmental assessment shall describe the impact of the proposed project on the existing site conditions described in Subsection D above, including the following. Detailed assessments are not required for impacts that are not applicable to a specific development proposal.
(1) 
Disturbance to natural topography, soils and geology.
(2) 
Removal of vegetation and woodlands and an outline of woodland areas to be preserved.
(3) 
Impact to fish and wildlife habitat.
(4) 
Alteration to surface drainage and groundwater recharge.
(5) 
Impact to rivers, channels and streams, including flow, flood stages, water temperature, stream bank erosion, crossings and quality for fish.
(6) 
Impact to wetlands, both in terms of direct impact of crossings/fill and impacts from developing surrounding uplands that contribute surface flows to the wetlands.
(7) 
Description of how the proposed use conforms or conflicts with existing and potential development patterns or potential negative impact to adjacent properties. Such assessment shall include compatibility with current and planned adjacent development, conformance with the Township Master Plan; lighting impact to adjacent properties; any increase or reduction in air pollutants; noise levels generated by the use with a level exceeding 55 decibels at the property line and the suitability of the site's ambient noise levels for the proposed use; modification to the aesthetic character of the area, and obstruction of views or sunlight.
(8) 
Description of the number of expected residents, employees, visitors or patrons, and the anticipated impact on public schools, recreation facilities, police protection, fire protection and emergency services.
(9) 
The method to be used to serve the development with water and sanitary sewer facilities; the method to be used to control drainage, both temporary and permanent on the site and from the site, including runoff control during periods of construction. For projects served by public sanitary sewer or public water systems, calculations for pre- and post-development flows shall be provided in comparison with sewer line capacity.
(10) 
A description of any hazardous substances expected to be used, stored or disposed of on the site. The information shall describe the type of materials, location within the site and method of containment.
F. 
A natural features mitigation, protection, and management plan shall identify any mitigation, meeting the requirements of § 98-9, natural features proposed to be preserved and the management practices required by § 98-10 to be implemented during and following completion of construction.
When environmental conditions are to be significantly impacted, or natural features are proposed to be removed, or disturbed, an examination and consideration of ways in which the proposed project can be modified to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts and to enhance environmental quality shall be provided. The analysis shall include consideration of no project and consideration of positive and negative effects of any such modification in relation to the design, use, location, cost and timing of the proposed project and its implementation. The alternative analysis report shall contain the following:
A. 
Alternative development plans that were considered which would limit the disturbance or removal of environmental conditions and natural features on and adjacent to the site.
B. 
Justification for selecting the proposed plan, including a written explanation as to why the proposed disturbance or removal is the minimum necessary to reasonably accomplish the permitted use.
C. 
A mitigation plan, consisting of a written and graphic description of the proposed measures to mitigate the removal or disturbance of environmental conditions or natural features.
A. 
When a site plan or plat proposes that natural features be removed or disturbed, the following mitigation measures shall be shown on the site plan or plat:
(1) 
Wetlands. Wetland mitigation shall be provided meeting the requirements of the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
(2) 
Endangered species habitat. Endangered species habitat shall be mitigated in accordance with the Michigan Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451, as amended.
(3) 
One-hundred-year floodplain. Floodplain areas shall be mitigated to provide no net loss of flood storage capacity and shall comply with any conditions of a valid permit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with the Michigan Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451, as amended. If mitigation is proposed off site, it shall be located in the same watershed as the development site.
(4) 
Regulated trees and woodlands. Woodland mitigation shall be provided as required by the Woodland and Tree Preservation Ordinance.[1]
[1]
Editor's Note: See Ch. 282, Woodland and Tree Protection.
(5) 
Steep slopes. Disturbed areas of steep slopes shall approximate the natural terrain and be planted with native vegetation at the completion of construction. No new drainage may be directed over areas of disturbed slope.
(6) 
Watercourses. Mitigation for disturbance of watercourses shall be provided according to the requirements of a valid permit from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with the Michigan Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451, as amended, or the Army Corps of Engineers, as applicable.
(7) 
All natural features. Disturbed areas to be reestablished shall be planted with species native to Michigan and characteristic of the plant communities of the areas before disturbance. The density and coverage of vegetation (except trees) shall be such that it will approximate the density and coverage before disturbance within three years after planting.
(8) 
Hazardous materials. Any use that involves hazardous materials shall provide proper handling procedures and safety precautions necessary to comply with Township, county, state and federal regulations. This shall also include a pollution incident protection plan.
(9) 
Traffic impact. Mitigation shall be provided for traffic impacts.
(10) 
Infrastructure. The development shall include the necessary utility and public facility improvements to support the proposed use and not adversely impact the development potential of other property in the area (i.e., not overload capacity or consume more than a proportionate share of the available public infrastructure capacity).
(11) 
Socioeconomic and built environment. The development shall include such elements necessary to be compatible with and not adversely impact the character of the area adjoining property.
B. 
The mitigation measures shown on the site plan or plat shall include:
(1) 
A written description of the mitigation program.
(2) 
Replacement calculations.
(3) 
Planting plan, showing the location of trees, shrubs and ground cover.
(4) 
Plant list, including botanical and common names, caliper sizes, root type, and height.
(5) 
Plans for necessary infrastructure improvements.
(6) 
Timing schedule for the implementation of the mitigation measures.
(7) 
A monitoring plan shall be provided to document the establishment of plants and hydrology, as applicable, ensure long-term maintenance of the mitigation. Annual reports shall be provided to the Community Development Department for three years following installation of mitigation.
C. 
Mitigation of natural features shall be provided on site. However, where mitigation cannot be accomplished on the site, all or part of the mitigation may be provided on public land within the Township if approved as part of the site plan or plat. Plans for off-site mitigation shall be included as part of the site plan or plat approval.
Natural features shown on a site plan or plat that are to be preserved shall be protected during construction. The following protection measures shall be shown on a drawing provided as part of the site plan or plat and followed during construction:
A. 
Protection measures for wetlands shall be provided as required by the Wetlands and Drainageways Ordinance.
B. 
Any woodland or historic/landmark/specimen trees shall be protected as required by the Woodlands Ordinance.
C. 
Prior to any development, clearing or other activity for which a permit is required, barrier fencing shall be installed to restrict access to protected natural features.
(1) 
Barrier fencing, such as snow fencing or similarly sturdy fencing, shall be provided at the limits of soil disturbance adjacent to natural features and at the edge of any open space identified on the site plan or plat to remain natural.
(2) 
Wood rail fencing shall be provided around the perimeter of the critical root zone of historic/landmark/specimen trees which are located within a disturbance area.
(3) 
No filling, excavating or storage of materials, debris or equipment shall take place within the fenced areas.
(4) 
Barrier fencing shall be a minimum of four feet in height and shall remain in place in good condition until it is authorized to be removed by the Community Development Department.
Any use which involves the use of large quantities of hazardous materials shall be required to include a materials management plan as an appendix of the environmental assessment for the safe use, recycling and disposal of such substances. Any use that involves fuel services and use or storage of large quantities of hazardous materials shall comply with the following requirements:
A. 
Materials management plan. A materials management plan shall be submitted that provides documentation for the following, with appropriate correspondence from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan State Police Fire Marshal, Grosse Ile Township Fire Department and Wayne County:
(1) 
Description of storage of any potentially hazardous materials, including common name, name of chemical components, material safety data sheets, location, maximum quantity expected on hand at any time, type of storage containers or base material, and anticipated procedure for use and handling;
(2) 
Description of any transportation, on-site treatment, storage or disposal of hazardous waste generated in quantities of 250 gallons or 2,200 pounds per month;
(3) 
Description of any secondary containment measures proposed, including design, construction materials and specifications, volume and security measures;
(4) 
Description of any discharge of any type of wastewater to a storm sewer, drain, river, stream, wetland, other surface water body or into the groundwater; and
(5) 
Name and phone number(s) of person(s) responsible for materials and available 24 hours, in case of detected spill or other incident.
B. 
Secondary containment. Establishments using, storing or handling hazardous material have provided secondary containment facilities and provide documentation of compliance with state and federal regulations, as required. Underground storage tanks shall be provided with noncorrosive double linings and leak detection systems.
C. 
Permits. Any necessary state permits for discharge of wastewater, storage of flammable or combustible liquids in above- or below-ground containers or storage of other hazardous materials shall be included as an appendix to the environmental assessment.
A. 
Disturbance to natural feature. No person shall construct, install or place any building or site improvement or remove or disturb any natural features for which site plan or subdivision plat approval is required, unless the approvals required by this chapter and any necessary permits have first been obtained.
B. 
Nuisance. Any use or activity in violation of the terms of this chapter is declared to be a nuisance per se, and may be abated by order of any court of competent jurisdiction. The Township Board, in addition to other remedies, may institute any appropriate action or proceeding to prevent, abate, or restrain the violation. All costs, fees, and expenses in connection with such action shall be assessed as damages against the violator(s).
C. 
Enforcement. If activities are conducted contrary to a use permit issued under this chapter or other applicable laws or ordinances, the Township Community Development Department shall give written notice to the permit grantee, or if a permit has not been issued, then to the person conducting the activity, notifying the person of the violation of the permit, this chapter, or other applicable law or ordinance, and to appear and, show cause why the activity should not be stopped. If the permit grantee or the person conducting the activity fails to appear and show cause within one workday after notice is delivered, the Community Development Department shall cause a written order to stop the activity to be posted on the premises. A person shall not continue or cause or allow to be continued activity in violation of such an order, except with permission of the enforcing agency to abate a dangerous condition or remove the violation, or except by court order. If an order to stop is not obeyed, the enforcing agency may apply to the Circuit Court of Wayne County for an order enjoining the violation of the order. This remedy is in addition to, and not in limitation of, any other remedy provided by law or ordinance.
D. 
Compliance with other laws. State and federal government laws and regulations governing development in wetlands, in floodplains, in watercourses, on bottomlands, and in the vicinity of rare, threatened or endangered species of plants or animals shall be complied with. Copies of approved permits must be submitted to the Township prior to site plan or tentative preliminary plat approval.
E. 
Certificate of occupancy. A certificate of occupancy shall not be issued for a property unless all required site improvements, including those associated with the protection and mitigation of natural features, have been installed and these improvements approved by the Community and Economic Development Director, or designee. The property owner shall have a continuing obligation to maintain required site improvements, natural features to be preserved, and natural features mitigation in a good condition.
F. 
Appeal. An appeal may be made by any person from a decision of the Planning Commission or Community Development Department in administering this chapter. Such an appeal shall be made to the Township Board which shall have the authority to approve, reverse or modify any such decision or recommendation.
The Planning Commission shall charge a reasonable fee to any person proposing a project subject to the provisions of this chapter which shall recover the estimated and actual costs to be incurred by the public agency in preparing any environmental assessment statement and any environmental assessment required for such project, and to recover the costs to be incurred for consultation with any person who has special expertise with respect to any environmental impact involved in the project. Such fees shall be established and paid prior to the Commission undertaking any environmental evaluation or any portion thereof with respect to the project.