Town of East Hampton, NY
Suffolk County
By using eCode360 you agree to be legally bound by the Terms of Use. If you do not agree to the Terms of Use, please do not use eCode360.
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
[HISTORY: Added by the Town Board of the Town of East Hampton 3-18-2004 by L.L. No. 4-2004]

§ C-1 Location and composition of district.

A. 
The Springs Historic District contains a mix of nineteenth-century farmhouses, barns, community buildings and commercial buildings in a rural setting.
B. 
The group of intact historic buildings, which includes 10 vernacular farmhouses, four barns, the 1844 Springs General Store, the 1882 Springs Community Presbyterian Church, the 1884 Springs School (Ashawagh Hall) and the 1886 Charles Parsons Blacksmith Shop, represent many facets of life in this thriving agrarian community during the nineteenth century.
C. 
Equally important to the historic buildings is their setting. Although the farms are no longer active and fields are overgrown, the barns, outbuildings and maintained clearings keep the rural landscape intact. The historic setting is especially vivid at the heart of the district with the triangular green at Ashawagh Hall, the Pussy's Pond preserve and the open farmyard and agricultural buildings of the Talmage-Miller House across Fireplace Road. This open setting maintains the relationships between the farmhouses, community buildings, country store and blacksmith shop. Also preserved are the important relationships of the nineteenth-century Springs Farm between farmhouse, barn, pastureland, woodland, salt meadow and the freshwater springs of Pussy's Pond.

§ C-2 Preservation goals for The Springs Historic District.

A. 
Maintain and enhance the elements that contribute to the overall setting: open yards and clearings, traditional fences along the road, visual connections between historic buildings and vistas to Accabonac Harbor.
B. 
Maintain the architectural integrity of the historic buildings, especially of the front facades and other components visible from the road.
C. 
Allow additions and other changes to rear walls and in appropriate ways to side walls to allow the historic buildings to be adapted to changing needs and lifestyles.
D. 
Maintain the architectural integrity of the barns and other agricultural structures and the integrity of their setting.

§ C-3 Summary of work that is exempt from review.

A. 
Work that is exempt from review for a property with an historic single-family residence.
(1) 
All roofing.
(2) 
All painting.
(3) 
Shingling side walls.
(4) 
Storm/screen windows and storm/screen doors.
(5) 
Window shutters.
(6) 
Gutters and leaders.
(7) 
Porch steps, porch flooring and railings to porch steps.
(8) 
Decks and terraces on the rear wall.
(9) 
Any work to the rear wall that does not require a building permit.
(10) 
Any work to a non-historic accessory building (less than 50 years old) which does not require a building permit.
(11) 
Wood horizontal-board fences with two or three rails and wood split-rail fences with two or three rails lees than four feet high.
(12) 
Resurfacing existing driveways.
(13) 
Walkways.
(14) 
Exterior lighting.
(15) 
Any minor repair where the purpose of the repair is to correct deterioration of a feature arid to restore that feature to its original condition.
B. 
Work that is exempt from review for a property with a nonhistoric single-family residence:
(1) 
All work listed above that is exempt for a property with an historic single-family residence.
(2) 
Any work to the residence itself which does not require a building permit.

§ C-4 Guidelines for site planing.

A. 
Fences and walls. The horizontal-board fences and split-rail fences contribute to the open and rural character of The Springs Historic District.
(1) 
Any fence along the front property line or in the front yard should contribute to the open character of the historic district.
(2) 
Wood horizontal-board fences with two or three rails and wood split-rail fences with two or three rails less than four feet in height are exempt from review.
(3) 
The following fences and walls would detract from the setting of the historic district and would be especially inappropriate along the front property line:
(a) 
A solid board fence;
(b) 
A chain link fence; and
(c) 
A masonry wall.
B. 
Grade changes, berms and retaining walls.
(1) 
The natural topography is an important feature of The Springs Historic District. Farmland, pastureland, woodland and the Accabonac Harbor salt meadows were important to the nineteenth-century agrarian economy and are essential to the setting of The Springs Historic District.
(2) 
Changing the grade and installing berms or retaining walls can affect the setting of the historic district.
(a) 
Changing the grade so as to alter the natural topography is not appropriate in the historic district.
(b) 
Berms and retaining walls are not appropriate in the historic district.
C. 
Driveways, walkways and parking areas. The intent is to encourage paving that does not detract from the setting of the historic district, especially at parking areas for nonresidential properties.
(1) 
A plan to install a new driveway or parking area will be reviewed for its impact on the setting of buildings in the district.
(2) 
All walkways are exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
(3) 
Resurfacing an existing driveway is exempt from review.
D. 
Tennis courts, swimming pools, decks and terraces. A new tennis court, swimming pool, deck or terrace should not detract from the setting of the historic buildings.
(1) 
A tennis court, or, swimming pool should not detract from the setting of the properties in the district. Therefore, the location of a swimming pool or tennis court on the property is the principal concern.
(2) 
Swimming pools and tennis courts should be located to the rear of the residence and not be visible from the road.
(3) 
Decks and terraces will be reviewed for their location and impact on the setting and architectural integrity of an historic building and the setting of other properties in the district. A deck or terrace on the rear wall of a residence is exempt from review.
E. 
Exterior lighting. Lighting on nonresidential properties can affect the setting of the residences.
(1) 
Exterior lighting is exempt from review for a property with a single-family residence.
(2) 
Exterior lighting on other properties should be appropriate to the rural character of the historic district and compatible with the residential areas of the district. Light fixtures should be sited to prevent glare or reflection onto adjacent properties.

§ C-5 Guidelines for historic buildings.

A. 
Work to the rear wall of a single-family residence that does not require a building permit is exempt from review. Any work to the rear wall of a single-family residence that does not require a building permit is exempt from review.
B. 
Wall material.
(1) 
The intent is to retain appropriate exterior materials, especially wood shingles.
(2) 
Wood shingled exteriors predominate on the historic buildings and make a major contribution to the cohesive character of The Springs Historic District. The Parsons Blacksmith Shop has vertical-board siding and Ashawagh Hall has a stucco exterior.
(a) 
Historic buildings with wood shingles, clapboards or vertical-board siding should retain these treatments.
(b) 
Replacing wood shingles with new wood shingles is exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
(c) 
Any other proposal to renew the siding on a building requires review.
C. 
Roof material. Roof material is not a critical factor in the historic district.
(1) 
Roof material is exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
(2) 
Gutters and leaders are exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
D. 
Doorways.
(1) 
The intent is to retain original front doorways that contribute to the historic character of a building.
(2) 
Among the rural farmhouses of this district, a simple entrance, such as that of the Abraham King House at 791 Fireplace Road, is as important as a more decorative entrance; such as the Greek Revival doorway of the Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House (Anderson House).
(a) 
Review is required for any proposal to replace a door or components of a door enframement.
(b) 
All significant elements of an original front doorway, including the door, should be retained and repaired instead of replaced. If replacement of any component is necessary, the new material should match that being replaced.
(c) 
Installing a storm/screen door at any doorway is exempt from review.
(d) 
For any single-family residence, installing an access to a door for the physically handicapped is exempt from review.
E. 
Windows.
(1) 
The intent is to retain original windows that contribute to the historic character of a building, especially on the front facade.
(2) 
A large number of the historic buildings retain the original windows and window sash. These are primarily the six-light sash of the Greek Revival period and the two-light sash of the Victorian era. These intact windows make a significant contribution to the architectural character and to the sense of authenticity of the historic district.
(a) 
Windows and their trim that contribute to the historic character of a building should be retained where reasonably feasible, as set forth below.
(b) 
For any request to replace window components the Architectural Review Board will consider the contribution the existing windows make to the historic character of the building. Replacement components for important windows, especially those on the front wall or another prominent wall, should match the material, configuration and dimensions of the original.
(c) 
When a window is deteriorated and needs to be replaced, the Board will work with the homeowner to find the best replacement at a reasonable cost.
(d) 
Storm windows, window screens and window shutters are exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
(e) 
Installing a skylight requires review.
F. 
Porches.
(1) 
The intent is to retain original porches that contribute to the historic character of a building.
(2) 
Front porches are important features of some of the Victorian-era farmhouses in the district such as the Julius Parsons House at 803 Fireplace Road and the Pollock-Krasner House.
(a) 
Removing, replacing or installing a porch or porch posts, columns, balustrades, brackets, and other important components requires review. Deteriorated components should be replaced in kind.
(b) 
Repair or replacement of porch steps, porch flooring and railings to porch steps are exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
G. 
Paint. Most historic buildings in the district retain the traditional color schemes of unpainted shingle siding with white trim or white siding with white trim. These two traditional color schemes are an important unifying feature of the district and contribute to the rural character.
(1) 
Paint is exempt from review for a single-family residence or a church.
(2) 
The following guidelines apply to other properties:
(a) 
Historic buildings with either natural shingle siding or with shingle or clapboard siding painted white should retain those treatments.
(b) 
Paint colors should be appropriate to the period and style of the building.
H. 
Other structures in the District.
(1) 
The intent is to retain the historic agricultural structures that contribute to the character of the district.
(2) 
The surviving barns and sheds are essential reminders of the agrarian history of The Springs. The Charles Parsons Blacksmith Shop is also part of this heritage. These structures are among the most valuable in the district; they should be retained and their historic and architectural integrity kept intact.
I. 
Additions and alterations.
(1) 
Additions and alterations are appropriate when they do not diminish the architectural integrity or the setting of a building.
(2) 
Additions and alterations should not alter an important historic feature of a building and should be compatible with the historic character of the building and the district.
(a) 
The addition or alteration should be compatible with the historic building and with the character of the district in scale, height, massing, proportion and arrangement of windows and other openings, roof form, texture, materials and architectural details.
(b) 
Additions should be subordinate in scale to the historic building.
(c) 
Additions set back on the rear wall are encouraged.
(d) 
Additions to a side wall are appropriate when they are secondary to the historic house. A side addition should be set back from the front wall of the historic house and be subordinate in size and scale to the historic house.
(e) 
Flexibility is required in reviewing additions and alterations to rear walls and to secondary side walls of houses where installation of doors, windows, and additions with more glazing that found in the historic house can be expected.

§ C-6 Guidelines for nonhistoric buildings.

A. 
Buildings that are less than 50 years old are classified as nonhistoric buildings.
B. 
In The Springs Historic District are six properties with nonhistoric houses. This classification is made in the historic district designation report. These six properties are: 753 Fireplace Road; 771 Fireplace Road; 814 Fireplace Road; 818 Fireplace Road; 825 Fireplace Road; and 21 Old Stone Highway.
C. 
These guidelines also apply to accessory buildings that are less than 50 years old.
D. 
Many of the nonhistoric houses and accessory buildings are set well back on their lots where they have little impact on the setting of the district. The plantings of an overgrown pasture, an informal mix of cedar trees and native deciduous trees, provide an appropriate screen for some of these buildings.
E. 
The intent of review of these nonhistoric buildings is to see that any changes do not detract from the setting of an historic building and do not diminish the character of the historic district. Therefore, any proposed changes to a nonhistoric building should be judged for their compatibility with neighboring historic buildings and with the character of the road and district in general.
F. 
Because most work on a nonhistoric building would have little or no effect on the historic district, these guidelines attempt to make the process as streamlined as possible.
(1) 
Any work to a nonhistoric building which does not require a building permit is exempt from review.
(2) 
Any work requiring a building permit is subject to review and will be judged by the principles of compatibility in § 255-7-60 of the East Hampton Town Code and amplified in the following "Guidelines for New Construction."
(3) 
In reviewing applications for nonhistoric buildings, the degree to which proposed changes will be visible from adjacent historic properties and from the road will be taken into account. Priority will be given to the compatibility of the most visible features of the proposed new addition or alteration.
(4) 
Any addition or alteration to a nonhistoric building may be in the style of that building.

§ C-7 Guidelines for new construction.

A. 
Accessory buildings.
(1) 
Location and plans for accessory buildings, such as garages, sheds and pool houses, will be reviewed. Generally these buildings should be sited to the rear of the main building and be compatible with the main building, its setting and with neighboring buildings.
(2) 
In reviewing applications for accessory buildings, the degree to which the proposed building will be visible from adjacent historic properties and from the road will be taken into account. Priority will be given to the compatibility of the most visible features of the proposed new building.
B. 
Principal buildings.
(1) 
New buildings should be compatible with the historic buildings and with the character of the historic district, Section 255-7-60B of the East Hampton Town Code provides criteria for judging the compatibility of new construction. These criteria, which are amplified below, define the basic design elements which establish the character of the historic district. The design elements of a new building should be in harmony with the same elements of the surrounding historic buildings.
(2) 
The builders of some of the recent houses within The Springs Historic District took advantage of the overgrown pasture landscape and set the new construction back from the road where it would be screened by the native vegetation. This practice has worked well in the rural context of this district.
(3) 
In reviewing applications for new construction, the degree to which the proposed building will be visible from adjacent historic properties and from the road will be taken into account. Priority will be given to the compatibility of the most visible features of the proposed new building.
(4) 
Setbacks and orientation.
(a) 
New buildings should be sited on their lots to best maintain the setting of neighboring historic buildings.
(b) 
The front facade of a new building should face the road.
(5) 
Rhythm of spacing of buildings.
(a) 
The rhythm of buildings and the spaces between which characterize the district should be maintained by the siting of a new building on its lot.
(6) 
Scale. scale of a new building and its features should be in harmony with the scale of the historic residences in the district.
(7) 
Height. The height of a new residence should be within the range of heights of the historic residences in the district.
(8) 
Massing. New buildings should employ the traditional simple forms prevalent in the district.
(9) 
Proportion and arrangement of windows and other openings.
(a) 
The windows of a new building should generally be rectangular with a vertical proportion.
(b) 
The arrangement of windows and doorways should produce a balanced facade.
(c) 
The front facade and prominent side facades of new buildings should have a ratio of door and window area to wall area similar to that of the historic residences.
(10) 
Roof form. New buildings should have a roof form typical of that of surrounding historic buildings. The roof slope should be within the range established by the historic roofs. Secondary components of some historic buildings have shed roofs.
(11) 
Materials. The materials of a new building should be in harmony with the materials of the historic residences. Wood shingles are an appropriate siding material. Painted wood doors, windows and trim would enhance the harmony of materials.
(12) 
Architectural details. The conservative use of decorative detail on new residences would enhance their compatibility with the historic houses in the district where the use of decorative elements is restrained.

§ C-8 Guidelines for demolishing a building or removing it from the district.

A. 
No building or structure or portion thereof that makes an important contribution to the district should be demolished or moved out of the district. Exceptions to this rule may be granted by the Architectural Review Board only as follows.
B. 
In considering a proposal to demolish a building or portion of a building or to move a building out of the district the following guidelines apply.
(1) 
The Architectural Review Board shall consider the historic and architectural significance of the building, the contribution the building makes to the historic district, and the impact of its removal on the character of the district.
(2) 
Nonhistoric buildings may be demolished or moved out of the district.
(3) 
If an application for demolition of an historic building is based on structural instability or deterioration, a technical report prepared by an architect or engineer is required. The report will detail the problems and provide cost estimates for their correction.
(4) 
The Architectural Review Board may require adequate documentation of an historic building through photographs and measured drawings as a condition of approval when there is no alternative but demolition.
(5) 
Before approval can be granted to demolish a building or move a building out of the district, the Architectural Review Board shall require plans for proposed new construction or other use of the site be submitted and approved.

§ C-9 Guidelines for relocating a building on its lot.

A. 
The character of the district is established by the traditional placement of the historic residences on their lots and by the resulting visual relationships between them. Historic buildings that make an important contribution to the district should remain on their original sites.
B. 
Exception to this rule may be granted by the Architectural Review Board only as follows.
C. 
In considering a proposal to relocate a building on its present lot the following guidelines apply:
(1) 
The rhythm of the road and the visual relationships between buildings should be maintained.
(2) 
The Board will consider the historic and architectural significance of the building, the contribution the building makes to the historic district at its present location and the impact of its proposed relocation on the character of the district. The Board will take into account the setbacks of other historic houses in the district which remain on their original sites.

§ C-10 Guidelines when designation is limited to an access strip.

A. 
The Springs Historic District includes the access strips to five flag lots. These are: 755 Fireplace Road; 757 Fireplace Road; 775 Fireplace Road; 777 Fireplace Road; and 815 Fireplace Road.
B. 
The main portion of these lots and the buildings on them are not in the district. The owners of these access strips are required to submit an application only for any fence, wall, gate or new driveway proposed within the designated access strip.

§ C-11 Guidelines for public property.

A. 
The nature of review for public property. Proposals for work to property owned by the Town of East Hampton will be submitted to the Architectural Review Board for their review. The Architectural Review Board will issue their findings in a report to the Town Board and to the official making the application. The report will explain how the proposal meets or does not meet the standards, criteria and guidelines that apply to The Springs Historic District and will consider any alternatives to the proposal that would better meet those standards, criteria and guidelines.
B. 
Fireplace Road, Old Stone Highway and public land.
(1) 
Fireplace Road, Old Stone Highway and the public land of the Pussy's Pond Nature Preserve and the Anderson House parcel should be managed in a way that maintains or enhances the setting of the historic district.
(2) 
The land which is now Pussy's Pond Nature Preserve along with the parcel containing the Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House (Anderson House) and Blacksmith Shop was the farm of Jonathan Ambrose Parsons and George Ambrose Parsons from the early 19th century into the early 20th century. This farm had pastureland, water for livestock in the spring-fed Pussy's Pond and salt meadows. These were the major resources of the important faiths of The Springs.
(3) 
The success of this farm is well expressed by the house Jonathan Ambrose Parsons built in 1842 (Anderson House) with its substantial size, Greek Revival form and elaborate doorway.
(4) 
The historic setting of the Parsons House has diminished as the abandoned pastureland has become overgrown with cedars and native deciduous trees and the upper pond has become filled in.
(5) 
Enhancing the relationship between the Parsons House (Anderson House), Pussy's Pond and the Parsons farm pastureland would greatly increase the ability of the Parsons House to evoke the agrarian history of The Springs.
(6) 
The open setting provided by the triangular green at Ashawagh Hall and the resulting visual connections between buildings gives the heart of the district its vivid historic character. More openness, especially at the Parsons House (Anderson House) lot and at the north end of Pussy's Pond preserve would further enhance the visual relationships between historic buildings and provide more of an agrarian setting.
(7) 
Alterations to public property subject to review by the Architectural Review Board include any plans to widen the road, install curbs, install a sidewalk, build a parking area, change the street lights, install any exterior lighting, install a fence or construct any building or structure within the district.
(a) 
Any proposal should maintain or enhance the setting of the historic buildings in the district.
(b) 
The rural character of Fireplace Road and Old Stone Highway should be retained. The roadway should be maintained at its present width with no curbing or shoulders.
(c) 
The historic district should be enhanced by creating a more open setting, especially at the Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House (Anderson House) lot and at the north end of Pussy's Pond preserve.
C. 
Public Buildings. The Town property includes the 1842 Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House (Anderson House); the 1886 Charles Parsons Blacksmith Shop, moved to this site from another property in the district in 1983; and a nonhistoric studio located behind the Anderson House.
(1) 
The Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House is among the most important historic buildings in the district. It retains a high level of architectural integrity with many original features, including the Greek Revival front entrance, windows with six-light sash, and the kitchen ell.
(2) 
The historic significance of the Charles Parsons Blacksmith Shop has long been recognized. When the future of the blacksmith shop was threatened the Town moved it to this site and subsequently restored the building. The Parsons Blacksmith Shop, where farm implements were manufactured and maintained, also makes an important contribution to the rural and agrarian character of the district.
(3) 
The architectural integrity of the Jonathan Ambrose Parsons House and the Charles Parsons Blacksmith Shop should be maintained.

§ C-12 The Nature Conservancy Preserves.

The Nature Conservancy owns two groups of contiguous parcel in the district which extend from Accabonac Harbor.
A. 
Adjacent to The Springs Community Presbyterian Church the Conservancy owns approximately 3.1 acres extending from Fireplace Road to Accabonac "Harbor. This preserve is at a critical location adjacent to the church, cemetery, and creek to Pussy's Pond and across the road from the intact farmhouse and fields at 803 Fireplace Road (Julius D. Parsons House). Vistas from these properties to Accabonac Harbor are important to the setting of the historic district and maintain the historic connection between this settlement and Accabonac Harbor.
B. 
A preserve of approximately three acres extends from the Pollack-Krasner House property to Accabonac Harbor. The open vista across salt meadows to the harbor is important to the setting of this National Historic Landmark.